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Answered 2007-08-25 13:28:45

The short answer is NO, I doubt that they could, it is not their right to waive.

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Nope. Its a liability for the tattooing company with out parent consent



I can't think of a reason why not. If you want to pay someone to insure something (or someone) they should let you. I suppose it really depends on exactly what the insurance policy is (life insurance, auto insurance, some other general liability insurance). Check with the specific insurance company about the specific type of insurance for an exact answer.


If the teenager is added to the parents' insurance, then consent is automatic as it is the parents who make the arrangement. As to whether a teenager can buy his or her own policy without parental consent, that may vary from company to company and state to state. Is is best to check with an independent insurance agent who is authorized to speak for several different companies, and will know any applicable state regulations.


This is a HIPAA (federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) violation.


Nope. It is a liability to take on underage clients with out consent


If such a scenario arises and you have objection to it, bring the matter to the notice of the official concerned of the branch office of the insurance company concerned in writing for their immediate needful action.


To insure your car which policy we recured that is motor insurance. You might want to check the site below to answer your question. They offer different kinds of car insurance policies at a very affordable premiums. They also give you free quotes and determine which insurance company meet your requirements. http://www.goodinsurancepolicy.com


At the clinic I work at, we have patients sign a release once a year allowing us to submit claims to their insurance company for the year. It doesn't specify which insurance company though. I would check with your clinic to see if you have signed something of the sort. And if not then it probably is illegal for your clinic to submit a claim without your permission.


The consent of surety to final payment is issued by the surety company at the end of a project. The consent states that the owner reserves their right under the bond and the surety company agrees the final payment will not relieve them of any of its obligations.


Yes, with your parent's knowledge and consent.


I am pretty sure that they can do that I'm a little younger than you probably think so.Hope it helped,Abbey


Of course not. Also note that you cannot insure a vehicle that you do not own. If you do the company will probably not pay a claim because you do not own the vehicle. They also cannot pay the owner of the vehicle for damage because that person does not have contract with the insurance company so overall you wasted the premiums. It is your responsbility to read your insurance policy and make sure the information is correct.


Consent to Rate means that the insurance company must have the consent of the insured (i.e. by a signed form) to charge higher than the filed (with the State, if applicable in your state) rate. **** More information** To elaborate on the above answer, Florida is a good example of a state that allows Consent to Rate - these forms must be signed prior to binding. the resons for consent to rate would be Unable to Obatin Coverage at the filed rate, Unfavorable loss experience, unusual hazards or claims activity and such. Source: Commercial Insurance Workers Compensation Expert


The answer is NO! If somebody used your car without your consent, it is theft. Simple as that .


The insured can never amend his insurance policy without the consent of his irrevocable beneficiary because this act would lessen or diminish what is due to the irrevocable beneficiary and thus considering that this is a diminution...consent of the IR beneficiary is necessary.


No, you can not get life insurance without the insured's consent, unless it's for a minor.


You don't have to agree but they will cancel the policy. Most homeowners policies include a replacement cost coverage to the structure so they want it to be insure properly.


They can if it is bought while you are a minor, otherwise it is insurance fraud and is illegal without your consent.


Yes, someone can take out a life insurance policy on you without your prior consent. An example would be a business which has a defined financial exposure resulting from the unexpected death of an essential employee.


Yes. This occurs when a review of your home shows it to be under insured. If your house is insured for 200,000 when it would actually cost 300,000 to replace then it is a problem as most insurance companies guarantee to cover up to the replacement cost.


No, you must have an "insurable Interest" and if other than a minor you must have their consent by signature. Then they must qualify for the insurance. 4LifeGuild


No they cannot... Unless... the vehicle was totalled in an accident and they have paid you for the actual cash value. They'll still require you sign certain documents releasing the vehicle to them for salvage value. Or... is your insurance company also your leinholder? Many insurance companies are now in the lending business. If that's the case, and you didn't make the payments then, of course, they can reposess the vehicle - it's legally theirs anyway until the loan is paid-off.


It depends on the terms of your insuring contract. Maybe yes maybe no, Just read the terms of your insurance policy or contact your insurance agent.


The CC Company may have seen an increase risk when they saw on an updated credit report/score. It could be a late payments, collections or any other derogatory item on your credit report that triggered it. The CC have the power to limit or increase your credit limit to lower their liability.



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