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Answered 2010-01-18 02:34:01

yes

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No, child support and alimony would be the sole responsibility of the husband.


Your husband can only adopt if the girls father willingly gives up his parental rights or the court terminates them. As her dad he will pay child support until the adoption is through. Then your husband have that responsibility and parental rights just like you. So see what your ex wants. The court stops child support etc when the adoption is through.


No. She has no legal responsibility to support the children. Only the biological parents have any responsibility for child support.



No, the support of children is the sole responsibility of the biological parent(s) not a new wife or husband. The income of the new spouse could be affected if the couple have joint accounts that are subject to attachment for child support arrearages or other judgment actions.


You should consult with an attorney. Your ex-wife's new husband would need to agree to legally adopt the children and take on the responsibility of financial support.You should consult with an attorney. Your ex-wife's new husband would need to agree to legally adopt the children and take on the responsibility of financial support.You should consult with an attorney. Your ex-wife's new husband would need to agree to legally adopt the children and take on the responsibility of financial support.You should consult with an attorney. Your ex-wife's new husband would need to agree to legally adopt the children and take on the responsibility of financial support.


Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.


Only biological parents are required to support their children.Only biological parents are required to support their children.Only biological parents are required to support their children.Only biological parents are required to support their children.


Yes, if: the child was conceived/born during the marriage; or, he signed an acknowledgment of paternity.


This question is a complicated one in that the laws of paternity do not necessarily establish the biological father as the father for child support purposes but rather look to the circumstances surrounding the case. Your husband is what is known as a presumed father, which is essentially a man that was married to the mother when the child was born, legally agreed to be the father of his wife's child (by signing the birth certificate, and has acted and behaved as the child's father. You cannot receive child support from both the presumed father (if he is still your husband) and the biological father (assuming he admits to being the father) and a court would likely determine your husband to be the father for purposes of child support.


The biological father's parental rights must be given up voluntarily or terminated by the court before your husband can adopt your child. It would simplify the process if the child's father would consent to the adoption. He should be reminded that if he did he would no longer be responsible for child support.


Yes. I am in Georgia and I adopted my niece. The biological parents were relinquished of all rights to the child, even child support responsibility.


This assumes that "back" support means "past-due" (i.e., unpaid) support. He has to pay in accordance with the order(s). His disability status does not exempt him from following the order.


Only the biological parents pay for their children, not the new spouses.


I'm not clear on what your asking. If your asking do you have to pay then it depends on a few things (assuming you two have kids of your own):You have to pay child support for your biological kids unless they have been adopted by someone else.You also have to pay child support for any of the kids she had with her ex husband if you have adopted any of them.You only pay child support for children that are legally years.If you actually were asking if you should pay or not, not weather you have to, then of course not! It's ridiculous paying for someone else responsibility.


If you are not the child's parent (biological or adoptive), you should not be paying support.This fully depends on the circumstances. If you were married at the time of the birth, you can. There's current a New York case where an ex-husband pays child support to the mother whose now married to the biological father.see links below



No. If the parents are living together the law assumes they taking care of the needs of their minor child/children (at least one would hope that is the case).


Her child's biological father if she has obtained a court order for child support.Her child's biological father if she has obtained a court order for child support.Her child's biological father if she has obtained a court order for child support.Her child's biological father if she has obtained a court order for child support.


No! The baby isn't his, why should he have to pay for it? If the real father decided not to stay, he could be taken to court for support. The law assumes that when a married woman has a baby it belongs to her husband. Even with DNA proof that would exonerate the father as the biological contributor, the answer is YES. A man who finds himself in this type of situation should consult with an attorney in his jurisdiction who can explain his options, responsibilities and legal rights.


No. She has no legal responsibility to support yourchild.She may voluntarily choose to pay it as an alternative to having her husband sent to jail for non-payment, of course.


Yes, his responsibility towards the child he fathered is not diminished by his ex partners new relationship.


If you didn't apply for a marriage license, you didn't get married in the eyes of the law. But that has nothing to do with child support. Child support is just that - support from the biological father for the child he helped to create. His responsibility to that child has nothing to do with marital status. If you did not go through the courts to get this support and you are worried that it won't continue, you need to take it to court and make his obligation to your child legally binding.




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