answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2011-07-28 13:10:25

No, of course not. If the non-custodial parent is keeping the custodial parent from the child then the custodial parent needs to get moving and take the matter to court immediately. The custodial parent also needs to get some counseling so that she can assert her rights more effectively and be a better parent for her child.

567
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2011-07-28 13:10:25

No, of course not. If the non-custodial parent is keeping the custodial parent from the child then the custodial parent needs to get moving and take the matter to court immediately. The custodial parent also needs to get some counseling so that she can assert her rights more effectively and be a better parent for her child.

No, of course not. If the non-custodial parent is keeping the custodial parent from the child then the custodial parent needs to get moving and take the matter to court immediately. The custodial parent also needs to get some counseling so that she can assert her rights more effectively and be a better parent for her child.

No, of course not. If the non-custodial parent is keeping the custodial parent from the child then the custodial parent needs to get moving and take the matter to court immediately. The custodial parent also needs to get some counseling so that she can assert her rights more effectively and be a better parent for her child.

No, of course not. If the non-custodial parent is keeping the custodial parent from the child then the custodial parent needs to get moving and take the matter to court immediately. The custodial parent also needs to get some counseling so that she can assert her rights more effectively and be a better parent for her child.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


If not married the custody belong to the mother automatically and the father have to go to court to get visitation rights or custody. If the mother can not take care fo the child and neglects it, the father can alsoi get custody.





Yes. The child is your baby. As long as your a fit mother the child cannot be taken away from you. If you are a minor, your parents still have custody of you, but you have custody of your child.


The only way a mother can take a child away from the custodial father for a few months is if the custodial father approves of it in writing, and the Court approves it if the child is taken out of the State. Without approval from the father, the child can only be taken if: 1. The mother has Sole legal custody of the child. 2. There are no orders that the father be allowed any visitation.



Even though the mother is underage she still has custody of her child as long as she does not do something to get custody taken away from her


Yes, unless there is a custody agreement in order. Neither mother or father has custody legally.


No, unless the baby's biological father relenquishes his parental rights, he would get custody of the child if the mother dies, not her husband. The biological father must sign his rights away to the mother's husband.


He can request it but the mother should raise an aggressive objection. There is no reason for the child to be away from their mother and in the care of someone other than their other parent just so the father can establish 50% custody to minimize child support payments. The mother should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues. It will be a good investment in the future.He can request it but the mother should raise an aggressive objection. There is no reason for the child to be away from their mother and in the care of someone other than their other parent just so the father can establish 50% custody to minimize child support payments. The mother should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues. It will be a good investment in the future.He can request it but the mother should raise an aggressive objection. There is no reason for the child to be away from their mother and in the care of someone other than their other parent just so the father can establish 50% custody to minimize child support payments. The mother should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues. It will be a good investment in the future.He can request it but the mother should raise an aggressive objection. There is no reason for the child to be away from their mother and in the care of someone other than their other parent just so the father can establish 50% custody to minimize child support payments. The mother should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues. It will be a good investment in the future.



yes, because it can be seen as child endangerment. you need to apply for full custody and the mother needs to be declared unfit to take care of the child by the court.


No. A father has absolutely no right to keep a child away from the mother unless there is a court order to that effect.No. A father has absolutely no right to keep a child away from the mother unless there is a court order to that effect.No. A father has absolutely no right to keep a child away from the mother unless there is a court order to that effect.No. A father has absolutely no right to keep a child away from the mother unless there is a court order to that effect.


No, the father, can take custody of the child but this does NOT take custody away from you just because you wanted to give your child up for adoption.


The police can bring the child back to his father since the court order says it is his weekend. The mother also have a responsibility to make sure the child is brought back and can not break the court order.


Get an attorney. There must be a definate, documented, just reason for taking custody away from a mother. Having parental rights taken from a mother is almost impossible...


Of course not. In the United States an unwed mother has sole custody of her child until the father has established his paternity legally, in court. Then he must petition for custody and/or visitation rights. He cannot make any changes in the custody of the child via a power of attorney. The unwed mother should exercise her parental rights aggressively and not allow grandparents or the father to take control of her "rights".


how about if my son ranaway from his mother house and ended up in my house (Father).. what can I do to get custody he is 15 yrs old


Not if there is a court order for visitation or shared custody. She would then need your permission and the courts.


In most places, the father has just as much right to their child as the mother does, even if they were never married. If the mother wants to legally keep the child away, she will need to go through the family courts. In some states, if she tries to do this without a court order, she can be charged with interfering with child custody or other charges. If there are no solid reasons to keep the father away, the judge may not grant the mother's request.


No. Those are common reasons why fathers threaten to "get custody" but a father needs substantial evidence that the mother is unfit and the child would be better off with him. Obtaining custody is a serious matter and courts do not take custody away from mothers unless there is a very good reason.Any unmarried mother should make certain she is providing a nurturing environment for her child and that she is placing her child's needs before her own. If the child is well cared for and in a healthy, safe, loving environment, the courts will not take custody away from the mother.See the related links below.No. Those are common reasons why fathers threaten to "get custody" but a father needs substantial evidence that the mother is unfit and the child would be better off with him. Obtaining custody is a serious matter and courts do not take custody away from mothers unless there is a very good reason.Any unmarried mother should make certain she is providing a nurturing environment for her child and that she is placing her child's needs before her own. If the child is well cared for and in a healthy, safe, loving environment, the courts will not take custody away from the mother.See the related links below.No. Those are common reasons why fathers threaten to "get custody" but a father needs substantial evidence that the mother is unfit and the child would be better off with him. Obtaining custody is a serious matter and courts do not take custody away from mothers unless there is a very good reason.Any unmarried mother should make certain she is providing a nurturing environment for her child and that she is placing her child's needs before her own. If the child is well cared for and in a healthy, safe, loving environment, the courts will not take custody away from the mother.See the related links below.No. Those are common reasons why fathers threaten to "get custody" but a father needs substantial evidence that the mother is unfit and the child would be better off with him. Obtaining custody is a serious matter and courts do not take custody away from mothers unless there is a very good reason.Any unmarried mother should make certain she is providing a nurturing environment for her child and that she is placing her child's needs before her own. If the child is well cared for and in a healthy, safe, loving environment, the courts will not take custody away from the mother.See the related links below.


You, because you are the mother of the child. Unless you got the baby taken away form you and someone else has custody of him/her.


Yes, plus it can be increased. His chances of them offering to give him custody is 15%. see link for help.


With no courts orders in place, the father has no legal right to have the child living with him. The mother has sole custody and control in all states, and he can still be obligated to pay support for this time period. He needs to immediately file a motion with the court to establish his rights and for at least temporary custody, pending a full hearing, before she gets wind of the fact that she can take the child away from him at any time. see links below.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.