answersLogoWhite
Ask
Repossession
History of the United States
South Carolina

Can the lender take your home and land for the deficiency owed on a leased car that was voluntarily repossessed in the state of South Carolina?

363738
Answer

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2015-07-15 18:38:00
2015-07-15 18:38:00

Most repossession laws are vertually identical, except for small variations, the law in the U.K. is, if you have not got in writing from the repossession company that when you hand back the car, that this will be "In full and final settlement" they can come after the leasee/garauntor for the short fall. But, if the garauntor has not secured his property against the lease/loan the repossessor has to start a small claims against the leasee and then to the garauntor, at this point the judges do not favour the repossessor. In any instance as far as i am aware you must always try to deal directly with the repossessor,(who will try to put his/her charges on top)and get a settlement figure from them in writing, DO NOT accept a telephone answer as this will give you no chance of proof if they decide to take you to court. At the end of the day they only want to get there money, but bare in mind that at some point you or the leasee paid a deposit to get the lease and must have made some payment before the repossession started to take place, this must be deducted before the repossessor puts his/her charges on to the final settlement. Again, the judge will not favour the repossessor if you are in financial difficulty and have made every effort to avoid court action.

1
0

Related Questions

User Avatar

READ your lease contract. It should specify the results of repossession.

User Avatar

the person the vehicle was leased to is responsible as they are the ones that have caused the vehicle to need to be repossessed.

User Avatar

Yes, and potentially more than was owed before the repossession due to accrued fees.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.