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Answered 2008-02-08 20:08:31

No. The state is not responsible for the accident or the driver. You can file suit against the uninsured motorist.

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no, uninsured motorist coverage is for injuries only when an uninsured motorist hurts the occupants of a vehicle......there is a coverage called uninsured motorist property damage, (most people do not have this and are even unaware that it is available, and is not available in all state) if you have that or collision coverage those will cover the damage to your vehicle ........


Uninsured Motorists Options on your Auto Insurance Policy Offer cover yourself and other passengers in your vehicle and comes with basically 2 options 1 Um / BI = Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury Coverage 2. Um / PD - Uninsured Motorist coverage Physical Damage BI covers Bodily injury to the driver and passengers in your vehicle. PD covers your Physical Damage for your Vehicle.


Uninsured will not cover this type of accident. Your comprehensive will cover this type of damage.


regardless of whom is insured or not, the 'negligent' or liable party is responsible for the damage or 'to make whole' the injured (this means damage to vehicle as well) party........ i think the insured should pay since it was there fault


I hope you had insurance for this. The uninsured motorist will probably be broke


Uninsured motorist coverage provides insurance coverage when you are hit by a person who has no insurance coverage. You uninsured motorist coverage will take the place of the insurance that the other person did not have and will cover your damages just like theirs should have if they had it. The only difference is that you will have a small deductible for property damage coverage.


Absolutely, unless you are independently wealthy and don't care if your vehicle is a total loss every once in a while. Uninsured motorist fees are very nominal compared to the alternative.


Uninsured motoristUninsured Motorist coverage (which is required coverage in many states) covers injuries that the driver and occupants of a car sustain when the at-fault vehicle was not insured for liability coverage. UM does not cover the physical damage to the vehicle. UMPD (uninsured motorist property damage), where available, covers that physical damage. UMPD is essentially similar to collision coverage, which is first party insurance that pays regardless of fault, subject to a deductible.Uninsured motorist coverage pays essentially the same type of benefits (such as for pain and suffering) as the liability insurance of the other party would pay if the at-fault party had liability insurance. Additionally, the uninsured motorist insurer will generally evaluate a claimant's injuries in much the same way as a liability insurer would, and the claimant is subject to a reduction in damages for contributory or comparative negligence according to the law of the jurisdiction.


No. Uninsured motorist coverage protects the owner of the vehicle which is damaged due to the actions of an uninsured driver of another vehicle (or damage caused by a hit-and-run driver). I think what you are asking is known as a 'permissive' driver - someone who was driving another person's vehicle with the owner's permission, but who is not actually named on the policy. The answer to this is 'probably' depending on the insurance company and the provisions of the policy itself, but if provided for would cover them like they were a named insured on the policy.


Yes. The initial trigger for entitlement to uninsured motorist benefits is involvement and injury in a motor vehicle collision with an uninsured motorist. According to state law, there may be other requirements as well (such as the existence of a permanent injury or significant scarring), but lack of insurance by the adverse party is the first requirement. Note also that, again depending upon state law, if you as the injured party negligently caused or contributed to the collision, your recovery may be reduced accordingly.


both, you for hitting the other vehicle and the other driver for being unlicensed



This depends on the specific state's laws in which you live. Generally in a pile-up the insurance companies duke it out, and often each goes through his/her own company for coverage, which would leave the uninsured motorist with no coverage for their vehicle. For injuries, depending on fault, you may possibly draw from the uninsured motorist coverage.


They are responsible if you know who they are,but if not,with State Farm you get a police report within 24 hours you can file it under uninsured motorist.


Should be turned into the company that is handling the uninsured motorist claim, (generally company that insured the 'insured' vehicle), they will most typcially wait to pay these bills until settlement is reached. If that didn't answer you question please expand it.


As far as I know all should, but insuring for any more than liability and perhaps uninsured motorist would be a waste of money.


Since you are the only person with insurance it would be your insurance that pays, if your policy says this situation is covered. It depends on your insurance policy. Some cover you, others don't


If you really need to know your lawyer should be able to get that info for his lawsuit. A lawsuit is really the only time you would need to know this because: The trucking company carries Workmans Comp-insurance on drivers by law or you would be covered for injury under another policy if you were in a collision with another vehicle. The un-insured motorist coverage is to cover all aspects of a collision caused by another person.


The California Collision Deductible Waiver (CDW) is coverage which waives your collision deductible if you are hit by a negligent uninsured motorist. The CDW option with a personal auto insurance policy in California pays your collision deductible when you carry collision coverage on a vehicle that is damaged by an uninsured or hit-and-run motorist who is at fault. Coverage typically applies only when there is actual physical contact and when you can identify the uninsured driver or vehicle. Some insurance companies will not even talk about the coverage even if it is included in your policy until you bring it to their attention.


First of all, you should consider a lawsuit ONLY if there were injuries or extensive vehicular damage that isn't covered by your policy's underinsured or uninsured motorist coverage. This is the type of situation that underinsured or uninsured motorist coverage is for, so it should take care of it. If your case is a valid one (you aren't just trying to get a big cash settlement), I think you can still pursue it. The incident happened in your state and regardless of current residency, she will have to deal with it (e.g., if you get a ticket in another state you still have to respond). Also , in general, you don't have to be in the same state as the potential defendant to file a lawsuit.


This is actually ONE coverage, serving two different purposes. You will often see this expressed on a declarations page as UM/UIM. Uninsured motorist coverage is self explanatory. YOUR uninsured motorist coverage on YOUR policy will pay for damages to your insured automobile when an 'at fault' vehicle does not have any insurance coverage to pay for your damages. UIM is UnderInsured Motorist coverage and would be available when the damages to -your vehicle exceed the amount of coverage in effect on the at fault party's liability coverage. This is an important coverage to have; very few state minimum liability limits are adequate anymore to offer full protection to owners. Rising auto costs and auto parts costs, plus the lower threshold to declare a total loss make higher UIM limits a sound decision.


No your vehicle is not covered. That is why it is always recommended that you carry comp and collision and uninsured motorist.


You do not have to purchase full coverage auto insurance in Illinois if your vehicle is paid for. You do still need Bodily Injury Liability, Property Damage Liability, and Uninsured Motorist coverage.


Did you locate the culprit? How much uninsured motorist insurance did you have? You have to find someone to sue.


Yes it can, although it might be subject to your deductible depending on the type of optional coverage you have. Uninsured motorist coverage is nice because it protects you from other drivers who either have no insurance or whose policy limits might be too low to cover damages to you and your vehicle. It is also relatively cheap compared to other optional coverages!