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No. The child has 2 parents not just one so both need to give their consent.



No. The courts are required to attempt to notify the father.


Her biological father must give up his parental rights and consent to the adoption. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in adoption.Her biological father must give up his parental rights and consent to the adoption. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in adoption.Her biological father must give up his parental rights and consent to the adoption. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in adoption.Her biological father must give up his parental rights and consent to the adoption. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in adoption.


Provided it does not include a relocation, yes.


A baby cannot be placed in an adoption without the consent of both parents - tis is something you and she (the mother) need to work out.


Each state has its own adoption laws. You will need to check with a lawyer concerning your local law. I know of one case where the father did not pay child support. The lawyer had the court declare the child abandoned by the father. Then adoption proceedings began. After the adoption became final, the birth father appeared. He could do nothing.


In Kansas, if the father did not begin paying child six month prior to the birth of the child, he cannot challenge an adoption. Guess how many know this?


There is no special significance to dreaming about one's father apart from the content and feeling of the dream. No interpretation is possible without knowing what one is doing for, to or with the father.




This question cannot be answered without knowing the characteristics of the mother, father, and calf.


Ever think about adoption? It would depend on why you can't have children, but what about looking into fertility treatment options?


Mothers are allowed to do that, but you could check adoption records. This type of thing happens frequently in Missouri. A mother moves there from another state, denies the father access, than after six months the child can be adopted by a stepparent, without the father knowing.see link


Open adoption is when the biological mother/father, and their child are still allowed to meet and see eachother, even after the adoption process is complete. Closed adoption is when the biological mother/father of the baby can see their child for a year after the adoption. They can send pictures, letters, etc. After the one year, they have no contact with them, until the child is 18.



The grandparents have no right to the child, only the parents can decide about adoption. If she does not want custody the father can get it.


Answer Go to any pharmacy and buy a paternity test kit, why tell the guy if you don't have to.


No, the father, can take custody of the child but this does NOT take custody away from you just because you wanted to give your child up for adoption.


no, changing the birth certificate requires adoption, and can only be done if the birth father's parental rights have been terminated.


I highly doubt that, the father has rights to that child, regardless of if they are married or not.


No, mothers frequently put the name of a father, even when he not the father, on the birth certificate, often without him knowing he has a child. See related link


Father from Argentina and mother is from Mexico Father from Argentina and mother is from Mexico


Biologically, a child can only have one father.However, other circumstances can lead to a child having more than one father figure in their life such as remarriage of their mother (stepfather) or adoption. By adoption, a child can acquire a new father who has all the legal rights of a biological father.


Whether or not the biological father still pays support until the adoption is final depends on the state of residence and the agreement that is in place. Typically the answer is yes, he must still pay support until the adoption is final.



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