Repossession
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Can you repo a car if you signed the loan but your ex-spouse is the only name on the registration and she is not making the payments?

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2015-07-15 19:50:39
2015-07-15 19:50:39

You CANT legally. She could report it STOLEN if you did. Best thing to do is contact the LENDER and assure them that YOU will make the payments IF they will repo it. AND get the registration out of her name. They can do that AFTER repo. Good Luck and MERRY CHRISTMAS.

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