Divorce and Marriage Law
Civil Lawsuits

Can you sue someone for breach of promise?

Answer

Wiki User
09/30/2014

Mr. Kluss' answer is completely correct, but let me add this. There do exist verbal contracts in other contexts (as well as, of course, written ones). One of the main differences, is that they are harder to prove because the parties may testify to differing terms of them. But like a written contract, a verbal one can only exist if there is an offer, an acceptance that mirrors the offer, and consideration. Consideration is something of value that binds the parties. Consideration can even consist of a party's agreement to refrain from doing something he/she/it had a right to do, or doing something that they did not have to do.

Wiki User
02/19/2011

Mr. Kluss' answer is completely correct, but let me add this. There do exist verbal contracts in other contexts (as well as, of course, written ones). One of the main differences, is that they are harder to prove because the parties may testify to differing terms of them. But like a written contract, a verbal one can only exist if there is an offer, an acceptance that mirrors the offer, and consideration. Consideration is something of value that binds the parties. Consideration can even consist of a party's agreement to refrain from doing something he/she/it had a right to do, or doing something that they did not have to do.

Breach of promise generally refers to a promise to marry. (Promises in writing are usually covered by contract law.) A promise to marry can be evidenced by wedding preparations made with the implied consent and cooperation of both parties. People do indeed sue for breach of promise if they suffered damages by relying on a promise of marriage. For example, a groom may back out at the last minute after the bride or her family has spent thousands on wedding expenses or in some cases one party quit their job and relocated to the other's place of residence in anticipation of marriage. It depends on the circumstances. Anyone in that position should consult with an attorney.

Breach of promise generally refers to a promise to marry. (Promises in writing are usually covered by contract law.) A promise to marry can be evidenced by wedding preparations made with the implied consent and cooperation of both parties. People do indeed sue for breach of promise if they suffered damages by relying on a promise of marriage. For example, a groom may back out at the last minute after the bride or her family has spent thousands on wedding expenses or in some cases one party quit their job and relocated to the other's place of residence in anticipation of marriage. It depends on the circumstances. Anyone in that position should consult with an attorney.

Breach of promise generally refers to a promise to marry. (Promises in writing are usually covered by contract law.) A promise to marry can be evidenced by wedding preparations made with the implied consent and cooperation of both parties. People do indeed sue for breach of promise if they suffered damages by relying on a promise of marriage. For example, a groom may back out at the last minute after the bride or her family has spent thousands on wedding expenses or in some cases one party quit their job and relocated to the other's place of residence in anticipation of marriage. It depends on the circumstances. Anyone in that position should consult with an attorney.

Breach of promise generally refers to a promise to marry. (Promises in writing are usually covered by contract law.) A promise to marry can be evidenced by wedding preparations made with the implied consent and cooperation of both parties. People do indeed sue for breach of promise if they suffered damages by relying on a promise of marriage. For example, a groom may back out at the last minute after the bride or her family has spent thousands on wedding expenses or in some cases one party quit their job and relocated to the other's place of residence in anticipation of marriage. It depends on the circumstances. Anyone in that position should consult with an attorney.

Wiki User
02/19/2011

Breach of promise generally refers to a promise to marry. (Promises in writing are usually covered by contract law.) A promise to marry can be evidenced by wedding preparations made with the implied consent and cooperation of both parties. People do indeed sue for breach of promise if they suffered damages by relying on a promise of marriage. For example, a groom may back out at the last minute after the bride or her family has spent thousands on wedding expenses or in some cases one party quit their job and relocated to the other's place of residence in anticipation of marriage. It depends on the circumstances. Anyone in that position should consult with an attorney.