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Can you transfer your house deed to your 17-year-old son?

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2011-01-15 16:54:21
2011-01-15 16:54:21
AnswerYou can make a gift of your property to anyone you choose, at any time, unless the intent is to defraud creditors. If you do make the gift, you might consider, among other things, putting in a deed restriction that reserves your right to live there rent-free for the rest of your life!

As a minor would be in possession of a valuable property, it would also be wise to appoint a guardian (or trustee) to oversee the property until some future date or event.

I am aware of a case where a man gave his castle to his son, and the son immediately evicted his step-mother!

See related question.

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If you and your wife owned the property by a survivorship deed you are now the sole owner and you can execute a deed that transfers the property to your son. You should always consult with an attorney who specializes in real estate when deed changes are contemplated. The attorney can review your situation, explain your options and inform you of all the consequences of making such a transfer. You should also discuss the reservation of a life estate. Remember that once you make the transfer the property will be vulnerable to your son's creditors, if any.

Yes, son's name must be added. Son is a separate entity from his father. The father's interest most likely passed to the mother when he died depending on how the property was titled in their deed. Therefore, if the son began signing his father's name it would be forgery and the repercussions would be serious. You should seek the advice of an attorney to transfer co-ownership to the son. You should tell the attorney of any documents the son has signed posing as his father.

Your son must execute a deed voluntarily and convey his interest to you.Your son must execute a deed voluntarily and convey his interest to you.Your son must execute a deed voluntarily and convey his interest to you.Your son must execute a deed voluntarily and convey his interest to you.

The least expensive method is for you to draft a deed from mother to son and record it in the land records. The smartest way is for you to hire an attorney who will explain your options, explain the the consequences of the transfer, and draft the deed properly. When a non-lawyer drafts and records legal documents mistakes can be extremely costly to fix later on. That is, if they can be fixed.

You cannot sell the house because you conveyed the fee to your son and daughter. They can sell the house subject to your life estate. Or, you can all join in a deed and convey the house to a third party.

If the tenancy in the deed is clearly defined as a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship the property will automatically pass to the survivor, bypassing probate. You should have the deed drafted by an attorney to make certain it is drafted property for your jurisdiction.

If you and your daughter own property then you each own a 1/2 share. You both must sign a deed in order to give your son an equal share. If you and your daughter execute a deed to you, your daughter and your son each will own a 1/3 share.You can transfer your own interest to your son, or a percentage of your interest. For example, you could transfer your 1/2 share to him or half of your share which would be 1/4. Your own deed will not affect your daughter's interest.In any case, deeds should always be drafted by a professional. Errors made by non-professionals can be difficult and costly to correct and can result in a cloud on the title. You should think through exactly what you want to do and then hire an attorney to draft a proper deed.If you and your daughter own property then you each own a 1/2 share. You both must sign a deed in order to give your son an equal share. If you and your daughter execute a deed to you, your daughter and your son each will own a 1/3 share.You can transfer your own interest to your son, or a percentage of your interest. For example, you could transfer your 1/2 share to him or half of your share which would be 1/4. Your own deed will not affect your daughter's interest.In any case, deeds should always be drafted by a professional. Errors made by non-professionals can be difficult and costly to correct and can result in a cloud on the title. You should think through exactly what you want to do and then hire an attorney to draft a proper deed.If you and your daughter own property then you each own a 1/2 share. You both must sign a deed in order to give your son an equal share. If you and your daughter execute a deed to you, your daughter and your son each will own a 1/3 share.You can transfer your own interest to your son, or a percentage of your interest. For example, you could transfer your 1/2 share to him or half of your share which would be 1/4. Your own deed will not affect your daughter's interest.In any case, deeds should always be drafted by a professional. Errors made by non-professionals can be difficult and costly to correct and can result in a cloud on the title. You should think through exactly what you want to do and then hire an attorney to draft a proper deed.If you and your daughter own property then you each own a 1/2 share. You both must sign a deed in order to give your son an equal share. If you and your daughter execute a deed to you, your daughter and your son each will own a 1/3 share.You can transfer your own interest to your son, or a percentage of your interest. For example, you could transfer your 1/2 share to him or half of your share which would be 1/4. Your own deed will not affect your daughter's interest.In any case, deeds should always be drafted by a professional. Errors made by non-professionals can be difficult and costly to correct and can result in a cloud on the title. You should think through exactly what you want to do and then hire an attorney to draft a proper deed.

You cannot remove someone's name from a deed. You would need to persuade your son-in-law to convey his interest to you by a quitclaim deed.

You should contact an attorney who specializes in real estate law in your jurisdiction. The attorney can draft a proper deed for your jurisdiction and also explain the legal consequences of the transfer of title.You should contact an attorney who specializes in real estate law in your jurisdiction. The attorney can draft a proper deed for your jurisdiction and also explain the legal consequences of the transfer of title.You should contact an attorney who specializes in real estate law in your jurisdiction. The attorney can draft a proper deed for your jurisdiction and also explain the legal consequences of the transfer of title.You should contact an attorney who specializes in real estate law in your jurisdiction. The attorney can draft a proper deed for your jurisdiction and also explain the legal consequences of the transfer of title.

That depends on how your mother and her son held title on the deed. If they held as joint tenants with the right of survivorship then when she died her son became the sole owner of the property. If they owned as tenants in common then when your mother died her half interest in the property would pass to her heirs at law if she had no will. The attorney who is handling the estate should be able to answer your questions and to examine both the validity of the deed from your mother to herself and her son and the tenancy that was created in the deed. There may be other assets apart from the real property that you are entitled to.

If mother conveyed property to her son by a valid deed then he is the new owner. She cannot nullify a deed once she has signed it and it has been recorded in the land records.If son granted mother a mortgage in the property and she reserved the right to foreclose in that mortgage document she can take the property back by foreclosure if he defaults on the mortgage.

Deeds should always be drafted by a professional. You should consult an attorney who can review your situation, explain your options and the consequences and draft a proper deed for your jurisdiction.

You don't give your state of residence and states vary in their interpretation of marital property when it comes to real estate. You REALLY need to consult with an attorney to learn your legal rights. If your name does not appear on the deed or title to the property you COULD be in legal jeapordy if your husband's will does not provide for you to inherit his interest in the home.

Yes. A joint tenant can sell their interest in the property to their son. The transfer will break the tenancy and the new owners will own as tenants in common. However, an attorney should draft the deed and the grantor should be made aware of all the tax consequence of making the transfer.

Well i don't know much about loans but i can say that the one who pays the EMI's of the complete loan of the house naturally the house will belong to him.Let us take an example of joint loan:Suppose a joint loan is taken by a mother and a son but the mother is unable to pay it's one of the EMI so his son pays the all the loan then it is quite natural that the house will belong to son only.

Yes a gift deed can be valid if it is done legally and correctly. The deed would have to be viewed by an attorney to determine if it was executed correctly.

A gift deed is a deed in which the consideration is not monetary, but is made in return for love and affection. It is a document which transfers property to another as a gift and must be recorded in the land records.

You are mixed up. You have mentioned two different transactions. You would need to choose one. You could convey the property to your son by a quitclaim deed and he would be the new owner and have control over the property. OR, you could convey the property to your daughter as trustee for the benefit of your son and then she would have title to and control over the property as his trustee. He would have no power over the property in that case. Whether you choose to convey the property to your son or to your daughter as trustee FBO your son you should seek the advice of an attorney to discuss your options. You may be able to set forth the trust in the deed or you may need to have a trust drafted to meet your requirements. In any case the transfer needs to be done properly by a professional.

If she has any rights to the house then she can evict you, is her name on the deed? Find this out, if it is, then yes. If your dad is alive and he has given her permission to take care of the rental, then yes.

The proper term for what you described is a life estate. The mother must have conveyed her home to her son. When she made that transfer she reserved a life estate for herself. Generally, that means she has the right to live in the house for the rest of her life. Her son cannot mortgage or sell the house without her approval. Her son owns the property subject to her life estate. If he wants to add you to the deed he may convey the property to himself and you as joint tenants with the right of survivorship, or as tenants by the entirety after you are married, but the property will be subject to the life estate of his mother. The mother could extinguish the life estate by conveying it back to her son. Otherwise, it will expire upon her death.

Son House was born on March 21, 1902.

since the deed is in joint tenancy,to my understanding, the deceased name will come off the property once the death certificate is recorded in that county for the deceased,if I am understanding the question right.If the house is in foreclosure,the first person with the first lien against the property will be paid first at the time of the actual sale of the property.

Son House died on October 19, 1988 at the age of 86.

He would be the natural heir unless the deed says otherwise. It would be put into trust for him. The divorce decree may also specify the distribution of the house.


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