answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2011-02-14 22:59:48

In this case the other parent is no longer the custodial parent. If the child is now staying with another guardian, they are now considered the custodial guardian and child support should be paid to them.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


Yes, as they are separate issues. However, a custodial parent can request a child support order at any time. Also, some jurisdictions do not allow parents to decide that the non-custodial parent will not pay child support. The view is that every child is entitled to be supported by both parents. If the custodial parent doesn't need it then the payments should be placed in a savings account to pay for college. Also, if the custodial parent and child are receiving any assistance then the non-custodial parent will be required make payments to the state.


Yes. The custodial parent and/or if involved state child support enforcement agency can sue for child support arrearages. If a judgment is granted it can be executed as a lien against the non custodial parents vehicle or other property.


Be prepared to pay. Children are legally entitled to the financial support of both parents. Even if the custodial parent doesn't "need" the money, it should be placed in a bank account for the child to be used for college, career training, a car, etc.Be prepared to pay. Children are legally entitled to the financial support of both parents. Even if the custodial parent doesn't "need" the money, it should be placed in a bank account for the child to be used for college, career training, a car, etc.Be prepared to pay. Children are legally entitled to the financial support of both parents. Even if the custodial parent doesn't "need" the money, it should be placed in a bank account for the child to be used for college, career training, a car, etc.Be prepared to pay. Children are legally entitled to the financial support of both parents. Even if the custodial parent doesn't "need" the money, it should be placed in a bank account for the child to be used for college, career training, a car, etc.


A lien can be placed on an inheritance for child support arrears. If the custodial parent knows of your pending inheritance a claim can be filed in the estate and the executor must pay it out of your inheritance.


No, the custodial parent can waive it but if she needs benefits from the state the other parent has to pay child support since it's parents obligation to support their child. If she waives it and needs it later on the case can be opened again. However, you should be aware that a judge may not allow the waiver since the child is entitled to the support of both parents. If the custodial parent doesn't need the money then it should be placed in an account for the child to use for college expenses.


Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.Generally, yes. If the parent will not care for the unfortunate child and she must be placed with other responsible adults who are paid by the state, the biological parent still has the responsibility to provide financial support.


Divorce, separation or single parenthood may lead a court to order the non-custodial parent (the parent who does not live in the same home as the child) to pay child support to the custodial parent. There are less frequent situations where both parents pay child support to the child's legal guardian. In either case, support should be provided to a child for his or her proper care. Child support regulation is an important social issue because of the rise in divorces and the number of children being raised in single parent households. State child support enforcement agencies have taken an active role in pursuing payments from non-custodial parents.The agency works with family court to issue a child support order. The amount of the support payment is based on the guidelines in the state, which is determined by the income of the non-custodial and the number of children for which child support is sought. The court will also consider the custodial parent's income. Extenuating circumstances may lead to a deviation of the guidelines in the court. A custodial parent who has a high income does not mean child support is not paid; the child has a right to benefit from the income of both parents. Child support payments can increase for cost of living adjustments or if the custodial parent's income decreases. Conversely, payments can decrease if circumstances change for the non-custodial parent.Joint CustodyBoth parents are considered custodial parents when a child spends equal time with both, typically six months per year with each. It is not uncommon for the court to still require one parent to pay child support, especially when there is an income disparity between the parents. For example, if one spouse stayed at home during the marriage and the other earned a six figure income, the stay-at-home parent could not meet daily expenses without financial support.Enforcing Child Support OrdersViolating a court order to pay child support payments can lead to state and federal government enforcement techniques. One of the most common techniques is a wage deduction order. Employers are ordered by the court to send a portion of the non-custodial parent's wages to the state agency that administers child support payments. The money is forwarded to the custodial parent. Wage deduction orders are used to collect current and past due child support payments.Federal and state tax refunds can be intercepted if a parent falls behind in child support payments. In some cases, liens are placed on real estate or automobiles to collect past due child support payment.


When the State assumes guardianship of a child, both parents become liable for child support, payable to the State as reimbursement.


Yes. If there is a court ordered set vistation schedule the non custodial parent can request the court to "force" the custodial parent and the minor child into adhering to the terms of the order. The custodial parent can contest the forced visitation for the minor child if there is a valid reason. Valid reasons would be, the child is being adversely affected emotionally, is being physically abused, is being placed in unsuitable or unsafe situations and so forth.


He can be subsequently jailed for drug charges and that he's an endangerment to his children due to the choice of lifestyle. Liens can be placed on property of value like his car or anything of value to get the behind child support. * Child support arrearages is a civil matter and has nothing to do with the alledged drug activities. Recovery of child support arrearages and enforcement of child support orders can be done in two ways, by the custodial parent filing a lawsuit in the state circuit court in the county of residence or by enlisting the assistance of the state's child support enforcement agency. If the father has visitation or custodial rights and he is placing the child in jeopardy by his lifestyle the custodial parent should request an investigation by the state's department of child protective services.


This is dependent on the circumstances and the state. Not if it is voluntary, however in Missouri, if being denied access, the obligor parent can file to have child support placed on hold.


File for support as if the parent were not incarcerated. If the parent owns property such as a bank account or real estate it can be levied or have a lien placed against it. The child support amount granted will accrue while the parent is in custody and he or she will be held responsible for payment of arrearages when released.


Depending on the state laws, no, it's not legal. If the parent has acknowledged their parental rights on a birth certificate, they have paternal or maternal rights to visit or see the child regardless of monetary trade. If a parent has NOT been placed on a birth certificate/acknowledged parent rights, they legally do not exist as a parent to the child and therefore do not have rights or responsibilities, unless first undergoing either a DNA/Paternity test or admitting to the conception.


The answer depends on the details. It depends on the reason for the guardianship. If the child was removed from the parent's custody and placed with a guardian the parent may or may not be able to regain custody. If the parent's parental rights were terminated they cannot get legal custody of the child back. If the parent consented to a temporary guardianship and the parent is now better able to care for the child the guardianship can be terminated and custody restored to the parent. It would not be necessary for the parent to adopt the child.


In simplest terms, the child support goes with the child. Most often it is not a matter of the child's choice with whom he will live. If the father has been making child support payments to the mother, and the mother dies, but the father still retains parental rights, the child automatically goes to the father's custody. If the mother has made guardian arrangements and the father has agreed to these (signed off), then the child support payments will automatically revert to the named guardian. It might require some adjustment on the part of the courts, but it is pretty automatic. If the father for what ever reason has lost parental rights, and the custodial mother has not named a guardian, the child will be placed with the next nearest relative, or if one cannot be located or none suitable are available be placed in foster care and the child support will go to the state. Child support follows the child.


The custodial parent has a few options:Call law enforcement, report the child as missing and where he or she may be. The police will return the child to the custodial parent's home. If it happens often enough, the child may be integrated into the juvenile justice system as a chronic runaway and placed in foster care, a state agency or juvenile facility until they reach the age of majority in the state where they liveFile an action in court against the non-custodial parent if he or she does not voluntarily return the child. This could spell very bad news for the non-custodial parent as some states interpret such an action as kidnapping even if the non-custodial parent doesn't remove the child from their legal home.It would be much better for all parties involved for the minor child to write to the judge with jurisdiction over the custody case making their wishes known. The older the child, the more weight will be given to their wishes and the judge may grant a modification to custody based on the same as long as the non-custodial parent can provide a safe and non-abusive environment for the child as well as meeting their basic financial needs.


Have child support services in your state handle the situation. They will revoke his license and try to seize assets.


they shouldnt. they child was placed in a new home perminatly. there shoulf be no child support with the new family unless it is needed by one of the parents.


A child support order is valid even when the person has been incarcerated, it is not "placed on hold". One of the terms of his or her release will be that they pay child support arrearages. If the person owns property and/or assets they can be seized and sold or have be incumbered by a lien even while the person is imprisoned. The custodial parent can enlist the aid of private counsel to take action against assets and/or property or file a request with the state's division of child support enforcement.


Liquid assets (bank accounts, etc.) can be seized for unpaid support. Liens can be placed on real property.


the noncustodial parent, or sometimes if there are other issues involved, you may be able to assign temporary custody to another relative. In either case, you should consult a family law attorney to avoid the kids being placed in foster care.


That depends on what's in your child support order. In WI the court can't order child support during college, however, if the parent voluntarily agreed to pay it and it was placed in the child support order, then it will be enforced.


If the other parents still resides in the jurisdiction of the original order, they can fight to have that state retain authority over the case.


Signature on the Visa Application and a notarized letter of permission. As a precaution, take the letter to the Clerk of the court to be Certified and make several a copies of. Have the original placed in the case file. This way it is in there in case she tries a last minute injunction to stop you from going. The judge will see the letter before considering the motion. see link below for further help


No. The court has placed the child into the guardian's care. The guardian cannot send the child to live elsewhere especially to live with the parents who lost custody.No. The court has placed the child into the guardian's care. The guardian cannot send the child to live elsewhere especially to live with the parents who lost custody.No. The court has placed the child into the guardian's care. The guardian cannot send the child to live elsewhere especially to live with the parents who lost custody.No. The court has placed the child into the guardian's care. The guardian cannot send the child to live elsewhere especially to live with the parents who lost custody.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.