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Does a new vehicle need to be insured with a company in the state where it was purchased?

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2015-07-15 18:29:55
2015-07-15 18:29:55

A car must be insured by a company authorized to write policies in the state where the owner or primary operator resides.

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994 means the vehicle is self-insured by the company it is registered to. Example : the NYPD uses 994 to indicate that they are self-insured.

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Yes, If your currently insured vehicle is traded in or upgraded then the newly purchased vehicle is automatically covered for the first 30 days with the exact same coverage as the vehicle you traded in. Within these thirty days you are required to notify your insurer of the vehicle change. Failure to notify the company within the required time period can void or nullify coverage on the newly acquired vehicle. Not that if the Newly purchased vehicle is an additional vehicle purchase, meaning it is not substituting or replacing an already insured vehicle, it may not be covered at all until added to your policy. This will vary by your state insurance laws. you have to notify your insurance company and they will transfer it to you until you can take it in to them to see and fill out forms.

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If your state requires that a vehicle be insured before operating it, the responsibility of knowing whether it is insured or not falls upon the actual operator of the vehicle, regardless of who owns it.

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No. The insured must be the owner of the vehicle. You cannot insure something that you do not own. This is in any state. You don't want to find this out when you have a claim. The insurance company cannot pay a claim on a vehicle where the owner of the vehicle is not the insured on the policy. As a matter of full disclosure, I own and operate a small Independent Insurance Company in Central Georgia and have for the past 22 years. Prior to that I worked as an agent for a direct writer of insurance for 3 years.

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No you can't. I'm having the same problem! In Michigan the Secretary of State requires a vehicle to be insured before you can register it but my insurance company requires the vehicle be registered in my name before they will insure it!

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That question doesn't really make sense. Yes your vehicle can be registered anywhere you have place of residency but uhh insurance is who ever your insurance company is IE. USAA, State Farm.....

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There are exceptions!If you are traveling, this is allowed within most adjoining states and countries. A good example exception is Mexico and USA If you are operating a commercial vehicle the rules can and are different. Each commercial vehicle is insured to be operated in certain places only.Living in another state:Living in another state will only be allowed if the insurance company knows.

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If the vehicle is currently registered (i.e.: has valid current tags) the state requires that it be insured. If the vehicle is not currently registered, it is not required that it be insured - but NOBODY may operate it.

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It really depends what state you live in. Although if you have full coverage on your vehicle you should report through your company and your company will go after the other insurance company to get their money back. If you have no collision coverage for your vehicle then you will need to file with the other insurance company and they will decide who was at fault for the accident, if their insured is at fault they will repair your vehicle

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In most states insuring a family members vehicle is acceptable. If it is not in your state then the vehicle can be insured in the sons name with you as an additional driver.

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The VEHICLE that you are driving must be properly insured.

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Depends on the state laws. Typically driver insurance coverage is extended to any driver of the vehicle insured. Insurance covers the vehicle and any legally licensed driver with permission to operate the vehicle.

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Over the past few years every state in the union has implemented laws that make it mandatory for anyone that has a vehicle to have it insured through some insurence company.

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In most states an insurance company must report to the DMV of your state that your insurance is been canceled. This often results in your state suspending your drivers license unless you can prove that you do not have a vehicle, and that the reason your insurance was canceled was because you no longer have a vehicle. The license plate that was obtained for the vehicle must be returned to the DMV. If insurance was purchased for the vehicle from another insurance company, then you must provide proof that you have insurance from the new insurance company. If the actual owner of the vehicle bought insurance from another insurance company, then this should be easy to prove.

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Not necessarily unless the 'owner' is also the parent of the underage driver. If not, assuming the car was insured, the insurance company may deny the claim. If the vehicle was not insured, then it becomes a civil matter where the owner of the vehicle may be sued by the accident victim and may be found responsible for not having had the vehicle insured if it is the law in your state. If this is the case, and you are not related to the young driver who stole your vehicle, then you have a civil case against that minor's parents and they would in turn be liable and responsible for any damages you may have been made responsible for.

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FDIC only insures bank deposits. Insurance company obligations are insured to certain limits by state insurance guarantee boards. If you contact your state insurance department, they can provide you with the limits of that state's coverage.

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What happens when an insured driver hits someone depends on the state you live in. In a no-fault state you present your claim to your insurance company for payment. In a tort state, you would sue the driver for compensation. If you have uninsured driver coverage, then your insurance company should cover you and/or your vehicle, up to a certain amount. You should check with your insurance company to be sure.

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If you were forced into striking another vehicle by a vehicle which struck you first, the vehicle that struck you is (usually) responsible for the entire accident. However, if you are required to have insurance in your state, that will not get you out of any ticket becauise of your lack of insurance.

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In most cases you need to insure the car with a policy written in the state that the vehicle is registered. Many states require that the insurance companies report the vehicles that they are insuring to the state for cross reference of motor vehicle registrations. So if you live in state A and your vehicle is registered in state A but insured in state B then state A will think that your vehicle is not insured and revoke your vehicle registration. Now if you live in state A but register and insure your vehicle in state B then you run the risk of not adhereing to the law that says you must register the vehicle in the state of your primary residence. If you have a legitimate reason for doing this such as a second residence in another state at which you keep a vehicle then you should have no problem doing this. If you are doing it to avoid higher taxes or insurance premiums then you will be doing something illegal.

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Yes, of course you can be sued for anything...The fact that neither vehicle wasn't insured does not obsolve the 'at fault' party from being responsible for the damage they caused to the 'innocent'.. (subject to state laws of course regarding recovery by an uninsured)

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The at fault driver always has the primary liability for the damages they cause in an accident. (The guy who rams the other guy).


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