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2008-10-17 12:56:29
2008-10-17 12:56:29

Yes. If you consider the "majority of voters" to be a majority of voters nationwide without regard to the state they are from, then it is possible for a person to be elected president if he/she wins enough electoral even if nationwide the majority of voters chose the other candidate. This is because electoral votes are counted state by state not on a percentage basis of the national voters (except for Maine and Nebraska).

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The electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state.


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The electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. Therefore, every elector in the Electoral College is expected to cast the electoral vote for the candidate who won the popular vote in that elector's state.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate. The President of the United States is the president for the people of all 50 states, not just the President for California, New York and a few of the other large states.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


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It is possible that a candidate could win the national popular vote total but lose the national electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state.


It is possible that for the U.S. as a whole a candidate could win the popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. That is similar to the way we elect U.S. Senators and members of the House of Representatives. An individual is elected regardless of the candidate receives 100% of the votes or wins by 1 vote.


Electoral votes in the Electoral College determine the President of the United States. Every state and DC are awarded a certain number of electoral votes with which to elect the President. Each state has electoral votes equal to the total of the 2 representative the state has in the U.S. Senate plus the number of representative the state has in the House of Representatives. The states choose as many electors as it has electoral votes and these electors elect the president. The electors are elected by popular vote in each state and each candidate for elector swears in advance whom he will vote for. 270 electoral votes in the Electoral College are needed to win the U.S. presidency. Since every state has two senators and at least one representative to the House, every state has at least 3 electoral votes. The District of Columbia gets 3 electoral votes. Therefore, the total number of electoral votes in the Electoral College is 538 - 100 (senators) + 435 (representatives) + 3 (for DC). A majority is 270 - one more than half of the total number of 538. It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.That enables the citizens of every state to have a say in the election of the president. If the president was selected by the national popular vote, the citizens in a few large states would select the president of the United States.


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