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No - it's a preventative.

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โˆ™ 2010-03-11 01:41:36
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Q: Does the new HPV vaccine have any curative properties?
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What are the chances of getting cervical cancer after a LEEP procedure and having had the HPV vaccine?

They are much lower than if you hadn't had the LEEP and HPV vaccine, but I don't know of any studies that can suggest a percentage risk for your situation.


The HPV Vaccine?

The HPV vaccine is a recently developed vaccine that protects young women against human papilloma virus, a type of virus that is responsible for genital warts, cervical cancer and other types of genital cancer. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus. There are many different strains of HPV, some of which are more likely to cause genital warts and some of which are more likely to cause cervical cancer. HPV is often asymptomatic in infected men and women, so people may not know that they are passing the disease on to their sexual partners. The HPV vaccine is designed to prevent cases of cervical cancer from cancer-causing strains, but some vaccine formulations also protect against the strains that cause genital warts.Demographics For the HPV VaccineThe vaccine for human papilloma virus is ideally given to young women before they become sexually active. The ideal age to give the HPV vaccine is 11 or 12 years old, but the vaccine can be given to women who are between the ages of 9 and 26. The HPV vaccine is not given to pregnant women of any age at this time.How is the HPV Vaccine Given?The HPV vaccine is given as a series of three injections, with one injection given every two months. It is important to receive the entire series of injections for optimum protection, because it is not known how much protection against HPV is gained from one or two injections, although the protection gained is probably better than nothing.Safety and Efficacy of the VaccineThe HPV vaccine is safe and effective at preventing HPV-related cervical cancer caused by certain prevalent strains of HPV. The vaccine prevents HPV infection with certain strains, but it does not treat infections that have already occurred. The available scientific data suggests that the immunity to HPV conferred by the vaccine does not decrease over time, so the vaccine series should be enough to protect a woman against HPV for the long term. The HPV vaccine does not protect against all possible strains of HPV, but it protects against the ones most common and most likely to cause cervical cancer.


Can Gardasil cause HPV?

No. This is not possible. The Gardasil vaccine contains recombinant proteins from HPV to provoke an immune response. There are no live viruses, attenuated viruses or even dead viruses in the vaccine. The viral DNA is not present in any form.


Can the HPV vaccine Gardasil be given to men?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. However the vaccine can and should be given to men of any age, as it reduces the risk of getting HPV, genital warts, and penile and rectal cancers caused by HPV. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to males as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


Can males get HPV vaccine?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. However the vaccine can and should be given to men of any age, as it reduces the risk of getting HPV, genital warts, and penile and rectal cancers caused by HPV. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to males as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


Can the HPV vaccine be given to males?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. The vaccine can also be given to people of any age, but it is most effective when given before the teenage years. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to boys as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


Can the HPV vaccine Gardasil be given to boys?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. The vaccine can also be given to people of any age, but it is most effective when given before the teenage years. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to boys as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


Can your son be vaccinated for HPV?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. However the vaccine can and should be given to men of any age, as it reduces the risk of getting HPV, genital warts, and penile and rectal cancers caused by HPV. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to males as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


If you had a hysterectomy can you still get HPV?

Yes. Anybody, including men, can get Human Papilloma Virus or HPV. In women, HPV can increase your chance of cervical cancer or genital warts. The HPV vaccine "Gardasil" is highly recommended for all young women, and it may not be a bad idea for all men as well. After all, men can be carriers of HPV, and the last thing any man would want to do is to give HPV to his wife or lover.


Can Gardasil be given to males?

Yes. A recent study has shown that Gardasil is 90% effective at preventing genital warts in males. Genital warts are caused by HPV (Human Papiloma Virus). Genital warts are responsible for most penile and rectal cancer, and by vaccinating against HPV, these men are protected from penile and rectal cancer caused by HPV. Giving the vaccine to men will also mean that they can not transmit HPV to their female partners. This would greatly reduce the risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infections in women. If all boys and girls were vaccinated for HPV, the HPV virus would be eliminated, causing rates of cervical, penile, and rectal cancer to drop by 80%. For the vaccine to be effective it must be given before an individual is exposed to HPV. This is why the vaccine should be given in childhood, usually between the ages of 9 and 14. However the vaccine can and should be given to men of any age, as it reduces the risk of getting HPV, genital warts, and penile and rectal cancers caused by HPV. At this point doctors can give the HPV vaccine Gardasil to males as an off label use. The label for Gardasil should be updated by the summer of 2009 to indicate its use for prevention of HPV infection, genital warts, penile cancer, and rectal cancer in males.


Can normal doctors give you the hpv jab?

Any kind of licensed health care professional can give the HPV immunization. Contact your health care provider to see if they carry the vaccine in their office. If they don't, they should be able to refer you to someone who does. The local departments of health and family planning centers typically give this vaccine as well.


What are the arguments for the HPV vaccine?

Like other vaccines, HPV vaccines are designed to lower your risk of infections cause by the virus it's made for. HPV can cause warts or cancer in some exposed to them. Granted that most who are exposed to HPV will probably be fine, but some won't. Vaccines are medicines; they all have risks and benefits. There will always somebody with some adverse reactions to any medicines, including the sugar pills during the clinical testing. Most people will be fine with the vaccine, otherwise it would not have past the clinical test and approved for use.

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