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From which animal do we get catgut?

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2007-10-18 08:11:23
2007-10-18 08:11:23

Cat gut is the name applied to cord of great toughness and tenacity prepared from the intestines of the sheep or goat, or occasionally from those of the hog, horse, mule, pig, and donkey. Those of the cat are not employed, and therefore it is supposed that the word is properly kitgut ("violin string"), kit meaning "fiddle," and that the present form has arisen through confusion that kit = cat. Another explanation of the origin of the cat in catgut is that it is an abbreviation for cattle which originally denoted not only cows, but all types of livestock. Source: Wikipedia

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2020-06-24 14:04:31
2020-06-24 14:04:31

chicken

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Related Questions


cow there is a whole page on it in tenniswarehouse.com

Silk, sinew, wool, catgut, angora, mohair and alpaca are all examples of animal fibers.

Sheep or goat or occasionally from those of the hog, horse, mule, pig, and donkey

catgut comes from the intestines of sheep or goat commonly.They also get it from pigs horses or mules.

It was never banned, manufacturers simply decided to stop supplying it. Catgut has no advantages over synthetic absorbable sutures, it has several known disadvantages, and there is the (theoretical but unsubstamtiated) risk of BSE contamination of bovine origin catgut. As catgut is only some 25% cheaper than the cheapest synthetic alternatives there is no substantial financial incentive to stick to it. In summary, catgut is an old soldier who, after a distinguished career has been honourably transferred to the reserves.

They are made of very fine wire (originally catgut) which was also used in the "snaring loop" of a small animal trap.

Catgut suture is absorbable - the body breaks it down by phagocytosis, eventually leaving no trace that it was ever there. Therefore, catgut is typically used in situations where the sutures will never be looked at again, much less removed by hand. Theoretically, catgut sutures could be removed in the same fashion as any other suture - cutting between the knot and the rest of the suture and removing the remnants.

CatGut (typically a form of suture material) is made mostly from sheep or goat intestine's, but it can be made from cattle, swine or equine intestines. However CatGut is prone to causing infections at the suture site unlike synthetic materials such as nylon and is therefore considered an inferior product be most people.

Typically? Spruce, ebony, and maple wood. Steel strings, though some instruments are still made with catgut(sheep guts). Varnish. Somtimes animal hide glue.

Catgut is a type of cord that is prepared from the natural fiber in the walls of animal intestines.For a long time, catgut was the most common material for the strings of harps, lutes, violins, and violas, as well as other stringed musical instruments. Catgut is still used as a high-performance string in tennis or squash racquets.Catgut suture was once a widely used material in surgical settings. The suture holds the wound together in good apposition until such time as the natural healing process is sufficiently well established to make the support from the suture material unnecessary and redundant.The available suture sizes and diameters are:6-0 = 0.07 mm5-0 = 0.10 mm4-0 = 0.15 mm3-0 = 0.20 mm2-0 = 0.30 mm0 = 0.35 mm1 = 0.40 mm2 = 0.5 mm

The sutures used to be manufactured from real cat intestine i don't think this is the right answer correct answer is- it is derived from cattlegut from where it probably got its name. second reason is it was initially called as kitgut. kit means fiddle. somehow unfortunately with time this kit was confused with the kitten (small cat) and thus got its name as catgut modified from kitgut.

Nylon, Vicryl, and "catgut" are 3 of the many kinds of suture material.

Archaeologists believe that in the Stone Age People across Asia and Europe sewed animal fur together with bones to use as "needles", for "thread" the people used various body parts of animals, such as: veins and catgut, and sinew.

Surgical stitches (sutures) are generally made of silk, catgut, wire, and plastic.

A lyre is a stringed instrument, so the vibrating part is a string originally made from catgut.

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Catgut-go oodles! Yes, the intestines of cats or other creatures, just like violin strings.

Gut, usually from sheep or goats, but it could be cow, horse, mule or pig. Often referred to as 'catgut' they were never actually made from cats.

A kind of suture (stitches) to close up wounds or surgical incisions. Catgut is used because over time, the body absorbs the internal stitches and they do not have to be removed when the healing is done. Catgut is made from the intestines of sheep and horses, used in stringing musical instruments such as the violin and is used in medical sub-dermal (beneath the skin) sutures. They are not made from cats. See the related link for more information.

Cat intestines (referred to as catgut) was at a time used in making the strings for stringed instruments. In modern times that practice is not anymore used and are now made with metals.

No, catgut sutures (as well as instrument strings) are made from fibers in sheep, cattle or goat intestines. They have never been made from cats. Most sutures today are cotton or synthetic.

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no. sounded 'bout the same. the sound of the instrument was more based on what the soundboard was made out of. What kind of wood and what kind of finishes were used.

big animal, small animal, baby animal, and DEAD animal.


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