Divorce and Marriage Law
California
Divorce

How can you find out if there is a marriage certificate or divorce in the state of California?

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2006-02-22 01:24:43
2006-02-22 01:24:43

Contact "Vital Statistics" Write to: CA Office of Vital Records M.S. 5103 P.O. Box 997410 Sacramento, CA 95899-7410 I recently requested a birth certificate and found a postcard in my mailbox about 2 weeks later from the State. It informed me that the average processing time for birth and death certificates is 4 weeks. However, for marriage and divorce certificates, it's up to 2-3 years. Perhaps a public records company could find the information for you. My guess is that it would take 2 or 3 days instead of 2 or 3 years. But that's just a guess.

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You get divorced in the state you live in. The lawyers will need the marriage certificate.

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Divorce laws vary from state to state.

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You do not 'cancel' a marriage certificate, but, in some States if you have been married less than a certain period of time (which varies from state to state) and meet other specific criteria you can have the marriage 'annulled.' This dissolves the marriage ab initio, and is legally distinct from a "divorce".If you got the license (not the "certificate", which is a document from the state that the marriage has been recorded) and then changed your mind before getting married, you don't usually need to explicitly "cancel" it. They normally expire after a short time (3 days to a month, again depending on the state) if the marriage is not solemnized (the "wedding" part) and recorded.

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If the marriage certificate was not issued by the state, no. You have to file for a license and execute the license.

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Yes, if the marriage is considered legal in the state in which it was made, all other US states grant the same right. What legal proof could I provide my employer in stead of a marriage certificate?

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depends on the state, but usually its 30-90 days after the marriage.

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Sure. Each state is part of a federal government and marriage, wills, other documents are recognized by other states as valid. Otherwise everyone would have to go to each state to have a marriage, divorce, or death certificate enforced.

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request it from the department of vital statistics in the state in was filed

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Yes the papers an be served in the state of California.

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You are entitled to get a divorce in California, regardless of the fact that you may be pregnant. California is a no fault state. Pregnancy has no impact on the ability to obtain a divorce based upon irreconcilable differences.


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