Parenting and Children
Emancipation and Ages for Moving Out
Miley Cyrus

How can you get emancipated from your adopted parents who are your grandparents so you can live with your dad?

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2006-06-14 03:37:27
2006-06-14 03:37:27

Emancipation laws vary by state. You need to check the laws of the state that you reside in. Be aware that not all states have an emancipation statute. At a minimum, you would have to provide a valid reason that emancipation would be in your best interest (*just* wanting to move in with Dad is not a valid reason) and prove that you are capable of fully supporting yourself, which doesn

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No, until they turn 18 or are emancipated, the parents determine where their children live.

If he is legally emancipated, or both parents are deemed unfit, or if the grandparents gain legal custody, then yes.

Yes. You have to apply for emancipation, then after you've been granted - you can live with anyone you want.

Emancipation is usually quite easily acquired if you can show that you can support yourself or show that your grandparents will support you. You do have to go to court. It's not as scarry as it sounds.

I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. But, if you live in the US... If you're about to be legally adopted, then your biological parents parental rights will be terminated (and your adoptive parents will gain those rights). Therefore, there's no need for emancipation from your biological parents, because they'll no longer have rights over you. Now, if what you're really asking is can you be emancipated in order to then be adopted--no. That's not the purpose of emancipation. In order to be adopted, your adoptive parents have to go through the normal legal process, which includes termination of parental rights (and that can be voluntary or involuntary, but to terminate involuntarily, they need a very good case).

No. Being emancipated means taking care of yourself and pay your own bills, have your own place, work etc. You can not seek early emancipation until you are 16 in the states that have that option. As long as you are a minor your parents or the court decides where you live.

It is up to the Parents To Allow her to live with her grandparents.

If you are a minor you need your parents permission to move.

Yes. But depending on where you live it can take a while.

The Gosselins rarely talk about the grandparents and they do not say to protect the parents' privacy.

His parents live in Canada but he lives with his grandparents in the United States.

No, as a minor you are not allowed to choose who to live with. That is up to the parents.

You either have parental consent to move, is emancipated by the court (if your state have that option), emancipated through marriage or is emancipated by turning 18.

No. A child cannot make that type of decision.They cannot live with grandparents unless both parents consent. Then the grandparents would need to obtain legal custody through the court. If the parents don't consent the grandparents would need to petition the court for guardianship and try to obtain legal custody over the parents' objections.No. A child cannot make that type of decision.They cannot live with grandparents unless both parents consent. Then the grandparents would need to obtain legal custody through the court. If the parents don't consent the grandparents would need to petition the court for guardianship and try to obtain legal custody over the parents' objections.No. A child cannot make that type of decision.They cannot live with grandparents unless both parents consent. Then the grandparents would need to obtain legal custody through the court. If the parents don't consent the grandparents would need to petition the court for guardianship and try to obtain legal custody over the parents' objections.No. A child cannot make that type of decision.They cannot live with grandparents unless both parents consent. Then the grandparents would need to obtain legal custody through the court. If the parents don't consent the grandparents would need to petition the court for guardianship and try to obtain legal custody over the parents' objections.

Not unless your grandparents are granted custody/guardianship by the court.

yes, as long as the parents agree to allow their child to live with their grandparents its fine as long as the grandparents can support the child.

Once you are 18 years old, you are a legal adult, you have the right to live where you choose, and with whom you choose. What is the reason your parents do not want you to live with your grandparents?

There are three ways a player qualifies to represent a country: through his or her birth, that of parents or grandparents, or residency which requires someone to live in their adopted nation for three successive years.

If you are emancipated, it's up to your parents as to whether you have to move out of the house or not. If your parents do not want you to continue to live with them, they can get an eviction notice to force you to move. However, in order for a court to approve emancipation, you have to prove to the court that you are self-supportive and that you have a place of your own to live.

Yes you are! you just have to take your issue to court and they will put you in a new home or they will let you pick where you can live.

only if you are emancipated and the only way you could be emancipated at 15 is to get married

No.... at 16.... if pregnant you are emancipated in the matters of your health or the baby's. You can make the decision to have an abortion, put the baby up for adoption, or even keep it and there is nothing that your parents can do about it. You do not have to wait for 18 to become emancipated. ou have to be 16 and can prove that you can live on your own with out your parents assistance. You also have the right to live with the baby's father.


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