Microsoft Windows
Linux
Windows 7

How can you run a Linux program on a computer with Windows?

474849

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2012-07-27 21:23:29
2012-07-27 21:23:29

Linux users have created emulators that allow several Windows products to run under Linux. The converse has not yet happened. Windows does not openly acknowledge Linux as anything worthy of their attention so Gates et. al. have not created an emulator for running Linux native applications. Just run it in Linux.

AnswerThis isn't possible right out of the box... however, there is a Windows project similar to a native emulator, called Cygwin. Like I said, it can't run Linux programs right out of the box (and it can't run all Linux programs). Instead, you have to build the programs from source within Cygwin. Normally, this is easy - you download the source code to the program you want to run, un-tar it in a folder, fire up Cygwin, switch to that folder, and type "./configure; make; make install" (without quotes). It has its limitations, but that's the best you can really get on Windows.... Answer:Microsoft has however, taken a small subset of Linux utilities and compiled and released them as part of some, if not all, Windows distributions. The 'netstat' command would be one example of a GNU utility that has been re-compiled by Microsoft and released with Windows.

Of course, as with nearly all GNU (and Unix) utilities, a '-' instead of a '/' is used to denote command line switches. Microsoft made few, if any changes to these program so they work as they do on a Linux or Unix system.

For example:

C:\> netstat -a

will display your current network connections,

C:\> netstat -r

will display your current routing table

etc, etc...

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


The Lotus is a database, notes, calendaring and email program that can be run on Windows, Mac, or Linux.

No. Windows and Linux have different APIs and ABIs for programs to access. You cannot run Linux binaries on Windows, and you can only run Windows binaries on Linux if you have Wine installed.

Yes, if the program is open source.

You don't run macOS applications on Linux unless there's a Linux port. As far as Windows goes, there is Wine. Do note that it's not an emulator and it won't run perfectly with everything.

Linux Wine is an open source software program. The Linux Wine software program allows Linux users to run Windows programs on their own devices such as computers.

instead of windows you can have linux or mac. they are different, but you will know whats best for you when you try them, linux is free to download.but you need an operating system (windows, mac, linux or any other OS) for the computer to work

In a Program called wine (Windows Emulator). Not all programs will work but most will.

There are no wild computer viruses that affect Linux. Oh wait, there was RST.b. If you need to, you can run certain windows viruses under Linux with wine.

Wine is a program that offers a compatibility layer allowing Linux users to run some Windows-native applications inside of Linux

You can run Pokesav on Ubuntu with WINE. WINE will also allow you to run other Windows programs on a Linux computer.http://www.winehq.org/

Because Linux is not Windows. Windows programs do not run on Linux for the same reason you can't wear shirts on your legs. The parts that interface between the operating system and software (or your appendages and your clothing) don't work in the same way and aren't designed to interact with one another. However, you can emulate Windows programs under a virtual computer or using WINE to interface the Windows program with the Linux operating system.

If the CD contains photos or music they will work on a Mac. If the CD contains a Windows program it will not run on any Apple computer.

You can install and run Microsoft Office in Linux, yes. You will need to install it separately, however; you can't just run the programs off your Windowspartition in Linux.

Yes, CA-dBFast works under Linux Wine program, Although, it would be better under a Virtual Machine running Windows.

Yes and no. Linux will not run Windows applications by itself, however, there are ample tools written for Linux that permit you to run Windows applications on Linux. The open-source WINE software will run a majority of Windows software on Linux. You can even configure Linux to automatically recognize Windows applications and use WINE to run them. Alternatively, there's a wide variety of virtual machine products that permit you to run the Windows operating system as an application under Linux, and, in turn, any Windows applications inside the Windows virtual environment. Finally, some "Windows applications" are written in .Net or Java and can be run directly under Linux using mono and java respectively (albeit, some .Net applications will not yet run under mono).

Yes, and is known as a dual-booting computer. Install Windows first, then your chosen distribution of Linux (Ubuntu is one example). You will be given the choice of which to use at the start of booting up the computer.

No. Any machine that is capable of running Windows 7 is equally capable of running Linux; thus virtually every computer is "Linux ready." Depending on your specific needs, Linux can be run on far less powerful and cheaper hardware than Windows 7 can.

linux uses alot less ram than windows 7 (the more ram used the slower the computer). therefore linux makes your computer run faster

Linux is a name for an operating system that was created by Linus Torvalds. It is an operating system in the since that you can run it like you would run Windows on a computer, but it is free. Linux is not an operating system in itself. Just like Windows is not an operating system in itself with Linux you have different distributions such as Linux Mint (which you should try) Just like you have Windows XP and Windows Vista Linux has different distributions. To a moderator of this site can you please move the question to the technology section. Thank You

Your question isn't exactly clear on whether you are trying to run a program on Linux or Windows, using one to control the other from a distance. If you are trying to control a Linux server from Windows, you can use a program called PuTTY to log into it remotely. If you are using Linux, a few Remote Desktop Protocol programs to control Windows are available.

You will need some operating system on your computer to run LimeWire. LimeWire is available for Linux, Mac OS X, and FreeBSD as well as Windows.

A quick and relatively easy method of getting Ubuntu Linux - if you already have a Windows system and you want to run Ubuntu Linux on it - is to download Ubuntu and install it by using the Wubi (the Windows-based Ubuntu Installer) from this Ubuntu web site: http://wubi-installer.org You can use the Wubi (Windows-based Ubuntu Installer) to download and install Ubuntu Linux in Windows and this is very similar to installing any software program in Windows. One of the great benefits of using the "Wubi Installer" is that you can also uninstall Ubuntu Linux from Windows if you need to (in the same way as you uninstall any Windows program). When you use the "Wubi Installer", you DON'T have to do the following steps (that you would "typically" need to do) to install the Desktop version of Ubuntu Linux on an existing Windows system: download a Linux ISO file burn the Linux ISO file to a Linux CD set up your computer to boot from CD boot with the Linux CD to run Linux "Live" and get to the GNOME desktop double-click on the "Install" icon to start the installation routine run the Ubuntu Linux installation routine Ubuntu Linux Training Tips: The Wubi Installer is only used to install the Desktop (not Server) Edition of Ubuntu Linux on an existing Windows system - and not on a new or used computer system that doesn't have Windows already installed on it. All of the "download, burn, setup, and so on" steps listed above will be described shortly in upcoming sections. The Ubuntu Linux installation steps described above are required to install the Desktop and Server Editions (versions) of Ubuntu Linux - either on a computer system that has Windows (to create a Dual-Boot Windows / Linux system) or one that doesn't have Windows Ubuntu Linux Training Tips: Keep in mind that prior to installing Ubuntu Linux (or any Linux distro) on an existing Windows system, you need to do a complete backup of your Windows system - twice! Also make sure that you can use the backups that you have created to restore your Windows system from backup. (copied from "http://www.ubuntulinuxbookblog.com/wubi-installer-windows-based-ubuntu-installer-training-download-install-ubuntu-linux-in-windows.html" ) A quick and relatively easy method of getting Ubuntu Linux - if you already have a Windows system and you want to run Ubuntu Linux on it - is to download Ubuntu and install it by using the Wubi (the Windows-based Ubuntu Installer) from this Ubuntu web site: http://wubi-installer.org You can use the Wubi (Windows-based Ubuntu Installer) to download and install Ubuntu Linux in Windows and this is very similar to installing any software program in Windows. One of the great benefits of using the "Wubi Installer" is that you can also uninstall Ubuntu Linux from Windows if you need to (in the same way as you uninstall any Windows program). When you use the "Wubi Installer", you DON'T have to do the following steps (that you would "typically" need to do) to install the Desktop version of Ubuntu Linux on an existing Windows system: download a Linux ISO file burn the Linux ISO file to a Linux CD set up your computer to boot from CD boot with the Linux CD to run Linux "Live" and get to the GNOME desktop double-click on the "Install" icon to start the installation routine run the Ubuntu Linux installation routine Ubuntu Linux Training Tips: The Wubi Installer is only used to install the Desktop (not Server) Edition of Ubuntu Linux on an existing Windows system - and not on a new or used computer system that doesn't have Windows already installed on it. All of the "download, burn, setup, and so on" steps listed above will be described shortly in upcoming sections. The Ubuntu Linux installation steps described above are required to install the Desktop and Server Editions (versions) of Ubuntu Linux - either on a computer system that has Windows (to create a Dual-Boot Windows / Linux system) or one that doesn't have Windows Ubuntu Linux Training Tips: Keep in mind that prior to installing Ubuntu Linux (or any Linux distro) on an existing Windows system, you need to do a complete backup of your Windows system - twice! Also make sure that you can use the backups that you have created to restore your Windows system from backup. (copied from "http://www.ubuntulinuxbookblog.com/wubi-installer-windows-based-ubuntu-installer-training-download-install-ubuntu-linux-in-windows.html" )

Yes, but much slower than it would run Windows XP or a Linux distribution. Make sure your computer has at least 1GB of RAM to run Vista decently.

You can do this if you have the program Play On Linux installed. You also need Wine, the freeware program that allows you to run Windows apps on Linux based machines. If you have both of those things, then all you need to do is to download Slender for Windows from the creator and you're good to go.

You can't. You could run it on a Linux virtual machine inside windows though.


Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.