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Sentence and Word Structure
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How do you change a noun or a pronoun sentence into an adjective sentence?

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Answered 2014-02-04 18:29:02

Noun sentence: Jane is nice.

Pronoun sentence: She is nice.

adjective sentence: Warm is nice.

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The noun is creatures.The pronoun is what (an interrogative pronoun).The adjective is these (describing the noun creatures).


An adjective describes a noun or pronoun.


No, the word her is a personal objective pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun as the object of a sentence or phrase; or an adjective, a word that describes a noun. Examples:Pronoun: Please give her change to her.Adjective: Please give her change to her.


His is a pronoun, a word that replaces a noun in a sentence.


The adjectives in the sentence are: many, happy, talkative. The noun in the sentence is: adults. There are no pronouns in this sentence. Note: The word 'many' can function as a noun, a pronoun, or an adjective. In the example sentence, the word 'many' is an adjective that describes the noun 'adults'.


"Angry" is an adjective, describing the subject, which in this sentence is the pronoun "I." (An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun.)


"In the sentence below, identify the pronoun and its antecedent?"In this sentence the pronoun is its.The antecedent for the possessive adjective its is the noun pronoun.


I married his youngest sister pronouns -- I , his verb -- married adjective -- youngest noun -- sister


The pronoun in the sentence is its, a possessive adjective.A possessive adjective is a pronoun placed before a noun to describe that noun as belonging to someone or something.In this sentence, the pronoun 'its' takes the place of the noun 'Venice', describing the noun 'glass' as belonging to 'it' (Venice).


There is no personal pronoun in the example sentence.The pronoun in the sentence is her, a possessive adjective.A possessive adjective is a word placed before a noun to describe that noun as belonging to someone or something in the sentence.The possessive adjective 'her' describes the dog as belonging to Celia.


The word these is a pronoun and an adjective:The pronoun 'these' is a demonstrative pronoun; a word that takes the place of a noun indicating relative nearness or distance in time or place. The demonstrative pronouns are this, that, these, and those.Example sentence: These are my favorite kind of apples.The adjective 'these' is a word that describes a noun. The use as an adjective can be identified when the adjective is placed in front of the noun it describes.Example sentence: These apples are my favorite.


The word these is an adjective and a pronoun:The adjective 'these' is a word that describes a noun. The use as an adjective can be identified when the adjective is placed in front of the noun it describes.Example sentence: These apples are my favorite.The pronoun 'these' is a demonstrative pronoun; a word that takes the place of a noun indicating relative nearness or distance in time or place. The demonstrative pronouns are this, that, these, and those.Example sentence: These are my favorite kind of apples.


The word 'guilty' is an adjective, a word that describes a noun.A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence.The word 'guilty' is the adjective form of the noun guilt.The pronoun that takes the place of the noun guilt in a sentence is it.Examples:He finally admitted his guilt. He could not bear it on his conscience. (the pronoun 'it' takes the place of the noun 'guilt' in the second sentence)He had a guilty conscience. (the adjective 'guilty' describes the noun 'conscience')


No, when the word 'this' is placed in front of a noun to describe that noun it is an adjective.The word 'this' is a pronoun when it takes the place of a noun in a sentence.The pronoun 'this' is a demonstrative pronoun.The demonstrative pronouns are: this, that, these, those.Examples:We have to be there at eight thismorning. (adjective)This is the morning we have to be there at eight. (pronoun)


other can be used as a pronoun or an adjective in the sentence above other is being used as a pronoun As an adjective: "the other day" where other is used to describe the noun day


The pronoun in the sentence is my.The pronoun 'my' is a possessive adjective a word placed before a noun to describe that noun as belonging to the speaker (the favorite of the person speaking).



An adjective is a word that describes, identifies or further defines a noun or a pronoun. In the sentence 'I like playing games' there is no adjective to describe the noun or pronoun.


If it does not contain a verb, it is not a complete sentence. It is a fragment.


The word 'which' is an adjective when its placed before a noun to describe that noun.The word 'which' is a pronoun when it takes the place of a noun in a sentence.Examples:I can't decide which movie to order. (adjective, describes the noun 'movie')Which would you prefer to watch? (pronoun, takes the place of the noun 'movie')


The word 'that' is a pronoun when it takes the place of a noun in a sentence.The word 'that' is an adjective when it is placed before a noun to describe that noun.Examplespronoun: I think mother will like that.adjective: I think mother will like that bouquet.


She quickly turned on the table lamp.pronoun = sheadverb = quicklyadjective = tableverb = turned onarticle = thenoun = lamp


In 'That is our school.' the word 'that' is a demonstrative pronoun; a word that takes the place of a noun.In 'That school is ours.' the word 'that' is a demonstrative adjective, a word that describes the noun.Note that in the first sentence, 'our' is the possessive adjective form describing the noun school; in the second sentence 'ours' is the possessive pronoun, taking the place of the noun school.


it is a possessive pronoun (but used as an adjective, because it modifies a noun).


An adjective cannot be the direct object of a noun or pronoun.



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