Coins and Paper Money
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How does a vending machine know what kind of a coin you put into it?

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2009-03-22 21:03:14
2009-03-22 21:03:14

It has like a little slot where the money goes down, and the money pushes the slot back, it know how much money it is because it measures how far the little slot goes back. or some go by weight.

A bit of research turned up that most modern vending machines use a technology called "electronic signatures" to recognize coins, but that most vendors don't publish the specifics of their systems in order to limit "hacking" or "spoofing".

In addition to size and weight, coins are distinguished by their metal composition. When passed through a small electromagnetic field each coin creates ripples or other disturbances that can be detected and analyzed. Different combinations of size and metal cause distinct patterns when coins are passed through such a field. The distinct pattern of a particular coin is called its electronic signature. If a coin does not match a known set of signatures stored in the vending machine's computer, it's rejected.

One consideration in a coin's design is whether the signature is sufficiently distinct from other coins that are likely to be used. For example, that's the reason that special alloys were developed for the new euro coins introduced in the EU in 2002, and for the "golden" dollar coins used in the U.S.

Older machines did in fact sort coins by size and weight. In fact, the first known vending machine was a water-dispenser built by the ancient Greek mathematician and inventor Hero (or Heron) of Alexandria. It used the weight of the inserted coin to determine how much water to dispense into the purchaser's jug.

Machines built in the 19th century sometimes used size-sorters to filter coins; they would roll down a track with holes arranged in increasing order of size. The smallest-size coins would fall through the first hole, then next-smallest through the second hole, and so on. Anything that didn't match would be rejected. Others added a kind of ski-jump to help sort by weight - as a coin fell down the track it would have to clear gaps based on its forward momentum. A coin that was too heavy or light would fall or overshoot. Of course these methods relied on the purchaser using only specific

sizes of coins, and could easily be fooled.

20th-century machines used still other mechanical means, including magnets. At first they were used just to detect slugs and washers, but as the technology developed manufacturers realized that even though coins are generally non-magnetic, they would still disturb a magnetic field as they passed by. That technology was the direct precursor of modern signature-based coin acceptors.

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Related Questions


It recognizes the type of cion or bill by the ink or kind of metal.

It has sensors to know what you put in the machine and a calculator to give change to you in coins.

It is important to do a great deal of research before starting any business. For a vending machine business, gumballs.com has a good starting guide for people considering vending machine routes. One might also talk to other vending machine operators to get experienced advice. If you don't know any owners, try calling the number on a vending machine to see if anyone will talk to you. Many vending machine businesses are run by individuals rather than large chains, so you might get the owner directly. Before starting a route, be sure to know how well traveled it is and by whom so that you know if you're likely to earn sufficient income from it.

Didnt know if you meant vending machine change machine, cash register etc.. I assumed a standard vending change machine service. Give these folks a try. http://www.superpages.com/yellowpages/C-Vending+Machines+Service+&+Repair/S-PA/T-Philadelphia/

I cannot say specifically if I don't know where you are located.

Saw one yesterday. I think this is how it works. Inside the vending machine, the items are organized in some kind of shelves or rack, or whatever you want to call that. Items are organized in that. Next thing we know that there's some kind of "lift" that will work and pick up the thing that you want. The "lift" will move up and down, left to right. and then drop the thing to the box where you pick it up. of course behind the rack of every column of item, you can find some kind of centrifugal stick that will give a force enough to make one item to be pushed into the lift. Well, this is my analysis after seeing an open drink vending machine yesterday.

the last pink boot is on top of a black vending machine on the set with all the food in it. It is the vending machine near the exit, where there is a door leading into the chicken set. I dont know where the script page is.

Yes. Although many opportunists would take advantage of the situation you would be stealing.

Either the machine wasnt filled/loaded properly in which case you just gave Coke a nice donation because there was nothing to vend. or The product is stuck in the machine and generally gets released when someone else tries to vend that product but it may not necessarily be the next vend, it could be two vends later meaning the third person to use the machine will get 3 Cans/bottles depending on which product you were trying to get. Why do I know this? I know it because ive seen a machine being loaded so I know how they work and because we have a Coke vending machine at work which does this all the time.

There are special "scanners" that can tell the difference between, say a five and a twenty, just like the human eye can.

You can buy different kinds of food from roadside stalls, street vendors, restaurants, grocery stores, from vending machine in buildings. Where did you get food from if you don't know this? Are you an alien?

To set-up for cans in a Dixie Narco, know the length of the cans to be vended. Then set the cans to its proper sizing. Settings are inside the vending machine.

It is if you know how to operate your buisness. Location and the time of consumers you are trying to attract is key. It is a good way to earn extra cash if you know what and where the highest consumers of your location will be.

the eagle a bald eagle! how could you not know that???????????

The taller one is named Bohdanna Saunders. I only know because I went to high school with her, not sure if she has been in anything else on TV or in print.

i dont know which city (havnt played in a while) but the one with the big pokemart go to the top floor and go up the last stair and you reached the roof and talk to the vending machine

Next visit with a doctor, ask them. They'll know where to get the best kind.

Since I don't know what kind of dollar coin you are referring to, all I can suggest is you perform the following steps : 1) Identify your coin here : 2) Estimate the grade of your coin here : 3) Look up the approximate retail value of your coin.

"Uncirculated" simply means "never been spent and in change" so if you have a new coin or bill (banknote) from the bank or a cash machine, it's considered to be uncirculated. As soon as it's spent at a store or put in a vending machine it's been in circulation. Of course if you have to prove that an item is uncirculated, that's more difficult. There are companies that get coins and bills directly from banks and resell them, and both the Mint (coins) and BEP (bills) will sell you uncirculated examples of their products. Then you know they're truly never circulated, but you'll have to pay extra for that assurance.

I don't know the weight of a coin but it varies by which coin you are weighing.

There is a really good vending cart website called www.hotdogcarts.com that has great prices and financing available. Another one is cart.pronto.com.

This is logically impossible. if you know its a coin it cannot be unidentified. for it is a coin!

The main guns for the british I believe were Maxims, dont know about the germans.


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