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"Domain advertising" is also known as "domaineering" which is the web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing generic internet domain names specifically for their use as an advertising medium or platform. Primarily speculating on domains as intellectual property What_is_domain_advertisingfor resale is known as "domaining" or "domain flipping" where generation of advertising revenue is considered more of a bonus while awaiting a sale for a capital gain. Analogous to the index headings in the yellow pages of a phone book, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset, not just functioning as a web address. As the value is intrinsically in the domain and not in a website, these domains are intended not to be developed into a conventional website. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Domaineers and some of those who advertise online using keywords believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering cite the practice for increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few. The earliest known verifiable defining of "domaineering" as a distinct Internet advertising practice is attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz.

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Q: How does domaineering and domaining using domain parking work?
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What is domain parking monetization?

Domain parking monetization means using domain names to generate income through the sale of pay per click (PPC ) advertising or alternately selling the Internet traffic that they may attract. Domain parking is used by both "domaineers" and "domainers" but with a different purpose by the two groups. "Domaineering", done by domaineers, is about earning advertising revenue as an end in itself, while "domaining", done by domainers, is about speculation with any income earned from advertising or Internet traffic as kind of a secondary bonus until the domain hopefully is sold, ( i.e. flipped ), for a capital gain. As an analogy, think of domaineering as "Madison Avenue" while domaining is "Wall Street".


Whats the best domain parking service?

There is no "one size fits all" answer to this question. Different domain parking companies work better for different domains. Some companies specialize in parking European domains or Asian domains etc. Also, it depends on what your ultimate goal is: selling domains for profit aka domaining or generating income from domain advertising aka domaineering. Domaineering is the web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names for their use primarily as an advertising medium rather than as intellectual property investments for resale as in domaining. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Domaineers and some of those who advertise online using keywords believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few domains.


What is domain monetization?

Domain monetization means using domain names to generate income through the sale of pay per click (PPC ) advertising or selling the Internet traffic that they may attract. Renting a domain also can "monetize" it. Domain monetization is used by both domaineers and domainers but with a different purpose by the two groups. Domaineering is about advertising as an end in itself, while domaining is about speculation with the income earned from advertising or traffic as kind of a secondary bonus until the domain hopefully is sold for a capital gain, although there may be some degree of overlap. As an analogy, think of domaineering as "Madison Avenue" while domaining is "Wall Street". Domaineering is the web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names for their use primarily as an advertising medium rather than speculating on domains as intellectual property investments for resale as in domaining. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Domaineers and some of those who advertise online using keywords believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few domains.


What is domain parking, what does this mean?

Domain parking is related to the internet. Domain parking refers to paying for an internet domain and then not really using the domain for anything. Some people do this to sell to someone who may want the domain later.


What is the difference between domaining and domaineering?

Domaineering is the web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names for their use primarily as an advertising medium rather than as intellectual property investments for resale as in domaining. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Domaineers and some of those who advertise online using keywords believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few.


What is domaineering?

Domaineering is the online marketing business practice of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names for their use primarily as an advertising medium rather than as intellectual property investments for resale as is generally the case in "domaining" which "domaineering" is occasionally confused with.In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits.As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience.Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "feed" of a word or phrase searched for. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website.Domaineers and some of those who advertise online using keywords believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web.Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few.Done right, domaineering can be very profitable.


What is domaining versus domaineering?

"Domaining" is defined as primarily speculating on Internet domain names as intellectual property investments for resale. Domaining may, but does not require, the use of domain parking services. In domaining, generating advertising revenue from domain parking, ( if done at all ), is considered something of a bonus while awaiting a sale of the domain. In short, domaining is the speculation on domains for capital gains by domainers.In contrast to and often confused with "domaining", "domaineering" is the niche web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names purposely focusing on their use specifically as an advertising medium. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset conveying information beyond just functioning as a typical web address. As the value here is intrinsically in the domain name as an information carrying vehicle and not in a website's products or services, these domains are developed for advertising, ( i.e, "parked" ), and not into "conventional" websites. It is a mistake to characterize a parked domain as "undeveloped" when in fact many are among the most highly specialized and monetized domains being as they are used solely for the purpose of advertising.As with traditional advertising, domaineering is considered part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as an advertising tool, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and keen knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience, including demographics and buying habits. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "ad feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website.Ethical domaineers contend that their product, i.e., "domain advertising", is a bona fide offering of goods or services in and of itself which provides rights to and legitimate interests in the generic domains they use. This serves as a rebuttal or defense in addressing occasional spurious accusations of cybersquatting on trademarks. Domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keyword domains believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Those same opponents of domaineering suggest that a better use would be for one firm to develop a website for it's products using a relevant generic keyword domain pointed at or as it's URL oddly for the same commercial purposes they cite the domaineer using it for, i.e., advertising. However, having one firm control a relevant generic keyword domain in this way to exclusively market it's own products under could be viewed as a significant barrier to entry by denying potential or actual competitors the same advantage to penetrate a market or maintain / increase market share. Domaineers instead can offer their generic keyword domains to several or more firms to advertise under thus promoting healthy competition and making markets more elastic than they otherwise might be which is usually of benefit to consumers.Domaineering aka "domain advertising" is practiced by both large organizations which may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains, ( example: toothpaste.com ), to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few. The identification and defining of domaineering as a distinct Internet advertising practice is often attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz's pioneering work on ecommerce evolution.


How does pay per click domaineering make money?

In Internet vocabulary or computer jargon, "domaineering" is a relatively new Internet marketing term originated by Prof. William Lorenz of Canada that has gained rapid acceptance in ecommerce. According to Professor Lorenz, domaineering is the niche web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names by purposely focusing on their use specifically as an advertising medium. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting organic natural search engine Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset conveying information beyond just functioning as a typical web address. As the value here is intrinsically in the domain name as an information carrying vehicle used to attract customers and not in a website's products or services, these domains are developed for advertising, ( i.e, "parked" ), and not into "conventional" websites. It is a mistake to characterize a parked domain as "not in use" when in fact many are among the most highly specialized and monetized domains being as they are used solely for the purpose of selling an advertising service and making money for their domaineer owners. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is considered part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as an advertising tool, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be "engineered" or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and keen knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience, including demographics and buying habits. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "ad feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. A person in the domaineering business is known as a "domaineer". Ethical domaineers contend that their product, i.e., "domain advertising", is a bona fide offering of goods or services in and of itself which provides rights to and legitimate interests in the generic keyword domains they use. This serves as a rebuttal or defense in addressing occasional spurious accusations of cybersquatting on trademarks. Domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keyword domains believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Those same opponents of domaineering suggest that a better use would be for one firm to develop a website for it's products using a relevant generic keyword domain pointed at or as it's URL oddly for the same commercial purposes they cite the domaineer using it as, i.e., advertising. Having, however, one firm control a relevant generic keyword domain in this way to exclusively market it's own products under could be viewed as a significant barrier to entry by denying potential or actual competitors the same advantage to penetrate a market or maintain / increase market share. Domaineers instead can offer their generic keyword domains to several or more firms to advertise under thus promoting healthy competition and making markets more perfect than they otherwise might be which benefits consumers. Domaineering aka "domain advertising" is practiced by both large organizations which may own hundreds or even thousands of domains, ( example: toothpaste.com ), to individual entrepreneurially minded domaineers who may only register one or a few. The identification and defining of domaineering as a distinct Internet advertising practice is often attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz's pioneering work in e-commerce evolution. "Domaineering" is sometimes mistakenly confused with the similar sounding word "domaining" when the two are distinctly different in meaning. Domaining, in computer terminology or Internet slang, is best defined as primarily speculating on Internet domain names as intellectual property investments for resale. Domaining may, but does not require, the use of domain parking services. In domaining, generating advertising revenue from domain parking, ( if done at all ), is considered something of a bonus while awaiting a sale of the domain. In essence, domaining is the speculation on domains for capital gains by those commonly referred to as "domainers". Meta Tags: ecommerce, paid, domaineering, domaineers, domaineer, domain parking, domainer, domainers, marketing, advertising, terminology, money, vocabulary, Internet, domains, seo, affiliate marketing, ppc, pay per click, domain names, domain registration, optimization, monetization, monetize, make money, monetize, pay per click,


What does PPC stand for in Internet domain advertising?

PPC means Pay Per Click. In Internet vocabulary or computer jargon, "domaineering" is a relatively new Internet marketing term originated by Prof. William Lorenz of Canada that has gained rapid acceptance in ecommerce. According to Professor Lorenz, domaineering is the niche web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names by purposely focusing on their use specifically as an advertising medium. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting organic natural search engine Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset conveying information beyond just functioning as a typical web address. As the value here is intrinsically in the domain name as an information carrying vehicle used to attract customers and not in a website's products or services, these domains are developed for advertising, ( i.e, "parked" ), and not into "conventional" websites. It is a mistake to characterize a parked domain as "not in use" when in fact many are among the most highly specialized and monetized domains being as they are used solely for the purpose of selling an advertising service and making money for their domaineer owners. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is considered part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as an advertising tool, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be "engineered" or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and keen knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience, including demographics and buying habits. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "ad feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. A person in the domaineering business is known as a "domaineer". Ethical domaineers contend that their product, i.e., "domain advertising", is a bona fide offering of goods or services in and of itself which provides rights to and legitimate interests in the generic keyword domains they use. This serves as a rebuttal or defense in addressing occasional spurious accusations of cybersquatting on trademarks. Domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keyword domains believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Those same opponents of domaineering suggest that a better use would be for one firm to develop a website for it's products using a relevant generic keyword domain pointed at or as it's URL oddly for the same commercial purposes they cite the domaineer using it as, i.e., advertising. Having, however, one firm control a relevant generic keyword domain in this way to exclusively market it's own products under could be viewed as a significant barrier to entry by denying potential or actual competitors the same advantage to penetrate a market or maintain / increase market share. Domaineers instead can offer their generic keyword domains to several or more firms to advertise under thus promoting healthy competition and making markets more perfect than they otherwise might be which benefits consumers. Domaineering aka "domain advertising" is practiced by both large organizations which may own hundreds or even thousands of domains, ( example: toothpaste.com ), to individual entrepreneurially minded domaineers who may only register one or a few. The identification and defining of domaineering as a distinct Internet advertising practice is often attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz's pioneering work in e-commerce evolution. "Domaineering" is sometimes mistakenly confused with the similar sounding word "domaining" when the two are distinctly different in meaning. Domaining, in computer terminology or Internet slang, is best defined as primarily speculating on Internet domain names as intellectual property investments for resale. Domaining may, but does not require, the use of domain parking services. In domaining, generating advertising revenue from domain parking, ( if done at all ), is considered something of a bonus while awaiting a sale of the domain. In essence, domaining is the speculation on domains for capital gains by those commonly referred to as "domainers". Meta Tags: ecommerce, paid, domaineering, domaineers, domaineer, domain parking, domainer, domainers, marketing, advertising, terminology, money, vocabulary, Internet, domains, seo, affiliate marketing, ppc, pay per click, domain names, domain registration, optimization, monetization, monetize, make money, monetize, pay per click.


What is the definition of the word domaineering in computer terminology?

In the development of Internet vocabulary or computer jargon, "domaineering" is relatively new marketing term from a Professor named William Lorenz of Canada.According to Lorenz, domaineering is the niche web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names by purposely focusing on their use specifically as an advertising medium. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset conveying information beyond just functioning as a typical web address. As the value here is intrinsically in the domain name as an information carrying vehicle and not in a website's products or services, these domains are developed for advertising, ( i.e, "parked" ), and not into "conventional" websites. It is a mistake to characterize a parked domain as "undeveloped" when in fact many are among the most highly specialized and monetized domains being as they are used solely for the purpose of advertising.As with traditional advertising, domaineering is considered part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as an advertising tool, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be "engineered" or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and keen knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience, including demographics and buying habits. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "ad feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website.Ethical domaineers contend that their product, i.e., "domain advertising", is a bonafide offering of goods or services in and of itself which provides rights to and legitimate interests in the generic keyword domains they use. This serves as a rebuttal or defense in addressing occasional spurious accusations of cybersquatting on registered trademarks. Domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keyword domains believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Those same opponents of domaineering suggest that a better use would be for one firm to develop a website for it's products using a relevant generic keyword domain pointed at or as it's URL oddly enough for the same commercial purposes they cite the domaineer using it for...that being advertising. Should, however, one firm gain control over an industry relevant generic keyword domain in this way to exclusively market it's own products under that could be viewed as a significant barrier to entry by denying potential or actual competitors the same advantage to penetrate a market, maintain or increase market share. Domaineers instead can offer their generic keyword domains to several or more firms to advertise under thus promoting healthy competition and making markets more perfect than they otherwise might be to benefit consumers.Domaineering aka "domain advertising" is practiced by both large organizations which may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains, ( example: toothpaste.com ), to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few. The identification and defining of domaineering as a distinct Internet advertising practice is often attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz's pioneering work in ecommerce evolution."Domaineering" is sometimes mistakenly confused with the similar sounding word "domaining" when the two have distinctly different meanings. Domaining, in computer terminology or Internet slang, is best defined as primarily speculating on Internet domain names as intellectual property investments for resale. Domaining may, but does not require, the use of domain parking services. In domaining, generating advertising revenue from domain parking, ( if done at all ), is considered something of a bonus while awaiting a sale of the domain. In short, domaining is the speculation on domains for capital gains by those commonly referred to as "domainers".


How can Internet domains be used to sell advertising?

In the parlance of Internet vocabulary or computer jargon, "domaineering" is relatively new marketing term that has gained rapid acceptance taken from the observations of ecommerce by Professor William Lorenz of Canada. According to Prof. Lorenz, domaineering is the niche web-based marketing business of acquiring and monetizing Internet domain names by purposely focusing on their use specifically as an advertising medium. In essence, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset conveying information beyond just functioning as a typical web address. As the value here is intrinsically in the domain name as an information carrying vehicle and not in a website's products or services, these domains are developed for advertising, ( i.e, "parked" ), and not into "conventional" websites. It is a mistake to characterize a parked domain as "undeveloped" when in fact many are among the most highly specialized and monetized domains being as they are used solely for the purpose of providing an advertising service which generates income for their "domaineer" owners. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is considered part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as an advertising tool, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be "engineered" or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and keen knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience, including demographics and buying habits. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored "ad feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Ethical domaineers contend that their product, i.e., "domain advertising", is a bona fide offering of goods or services in and of itself which provides rights to and legitimate interests in the generic keyword domains they use. This serves as a rebuttal or defense in addressing occasional spurious accusations of cybersquatting on trademarks. Domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keyword domains believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service while opponents of domaineering decry the practice as increasing the ubiquitous commercialization of the world wide web. Those same opponents of domaineering suggest that a better use would be for one firm to develop a website for it's products using a relevant generic keyword domain pointed at or as it's URL oddly for the same commercial purposes they cite the domaineer using it as, i.e., advertising. Having, however, one firm control a relevant generic keyword domain in this way to exclusively market it's own products under could be viewed as a significant barrier to entry by denying potential or actual competitors the same advantage to penetrate a market or maintain / increase market share. Domaineers instead can offer their generic keyword domains to several or more firms to advertise under thus promoting healthy competition and making markets more perfect than they otherwise might be which benefits consumers. Domaineering aka "domain advertising" is practiced by both large organizations which may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few. The identification and defining of domaineering as a distinct Internet advertising practice is often attributed to Canadian Professor William Lorenz's pioneering work in ecommerce evolution. "Domaineering" is sometimes mistakenly confused with the similar sounding word "domaining" when the two are distinctly different in meaning. Domaining, in computer terminology or the lexicon of Internet slang, is best defined as primarily speculating on Internet domain names as intellectual property investments for resale. Domaining may, but does not require, the use of domain parking services. In domaining, generating advertising revenue from domain parking, ( if done at all ), is considered something of a bonus while awaiting a sale of the domain. In short, domaining is the speculation on domains for capital gains by those commonly referred to as "domainers".


How does using domain names for Internet advertising work?

The way it is set up, the Internet cannot ignore domain names which are like phone numbers to a phone book. Domain names are therefore destinations that Internet traffic will ultimately end up at when web searches are performed. Attracting that Internet search traffic by matching the search to a generic domain name is known as "Domaineering". Domaineering is a semi-composed word derived form the notion that domain names can be "engineered" or crafted to attract Internet traffic from search engines. "Domaineering", which is also known as "domain monetization", is a niche web-based marketing business involving the acquiring and monetizing of names specifically for their use as an advertising medium or platform. Domaineering differs from primarily speculating on domains as intellectual property investments for resale as in "domaining" where generating advertising revenue is considered more of a bonus while awaiting a sale of a domain. Analogous to the index headings in the yellow pages of a phone book, the domain names function as virtual Internet billboards with generic domain names being highly valued for their revenue generating potential derived from attracting Internet traffic hits. Revenue is earned as potential customers view pay per click ( PPC ) ads or the Internet traffic attracted may be redirected to another website. Hence, the domain name itself is the revenue generating asset, not merely functioning as a web address. As the value is intrinsically in the generic keyword domain name and not in a website, these domains are not intended to be developed into a conventional websites because they are more valuable to their owners as an income producing advertising platform. As with traditional advertising, domaineering is part art and part science. Often to be the most effective as advertising tools, the domain names and their corresponding landing pages must be engineered or optimized to produce maximum revenue which may require considerable skill and good knowledge of search engine optimization ( SEO ) practices, marketing psychology and an understanding of the target market audience. Domaineering generally utilizes a firm offering domain parking services to provide the sponsored ad "feed" of a word or phrase searched for thus creating a mini-directory populated largely by advertisers paying to promote their products and services under a relevant generic keyword domain. Occasionally content is added to develop a functional mini-website. Ethical domaineers and others who advertise online using generic keywords as metatags believe domaineering provides a useful, legal and legitimate Internet marketing service which helps better organize the world wide web. Domaineering is practiced by both large companies who may have registered hundreds or even thousands of domains to individual entrepreneurial minded domaineers who may only own one or a few. The generally accepted definition and origin of domaineering as a distinct Internet marketing practice is attributed to a Canadian Professor named William Lorenz.

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