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Q: If the woman was homozygous recessive for color blindness and the father was normal, what?
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Is it true that people who are heterozygous recessive allele but who have a normal phenotype eill not pass the harmful recessive allele to their kids?

It depends on the genotype of the childs other parent. If your partner is heterozygous as well then there is a 25% chance your child will be homozygous recessive. If they are homozygous dominant then none of your children will have the phenotype of the recessive trait. They will just possibly be carriers of the recessive allele.


A male who has normal vision marries a female who is a carrier for colorblindness can they have a colorblind daughter?

Assuming that the man who has normal vision is homozygous for normal vision, the couple's daughter will either be homozygous for normal vision or heterozygous (normal vision but carrier for color blindness) for normal vision. In light of this, the couple's daughter will not be color blind.


Is diabetes homozygous or heterozygous?

Diabetes mellitus is represented by 'D' for dominant trait i.e. person is normal or not suffering from diabetes.Diabetes mellitus is a homozygous recessive trait i.e. 'dd'. A person having this trait will suffer from diabetes.


What is genotype of the plant with colored seed and normal strach you used in the test cross?

Homozygous recessive; if 'r' stands for color of the seed and 's' for normal starch, then the genotype of this plant used in a test cross will be ( rrss ).


They have a daughter who is a dwarf with normal color vision. What is the probability that she is heterozygous for both genes?

Color Blindness is x-linked recessive. Therefore, it could not be heterozygous; the daughter would not be colorblind, but rather have normal vision.


Can give example about overdominance?

Overdominance is when the heterozygote has an advantage over both the recessive and dominant homozygotes. Sickle cell disease is an example of this. When the individual is homozygous for the sickle cell allele, sickle cell disease is shown. When the the individual is homozygous for the wildtype allele, they appear normal. However, when the individual is heterozygous, he or she appears normal and will also be resistent to malaria.


What would be the color vision of children if their mom is colorblind and their dad is normal?

Colorblindness is a recessive, sex-linked trait, and the gene that causes it occurs on the X chromosome. For the mother to be colorblind, she must have two copies of the gene and be homozygous recessive. The father, on the other hand, can not have the gene, because he (as a male) only has one X chromosome. So, if we let Xc represent the recessive gene for colorblindness and Xn represent the normal gene, the the mother is XcXc and the father is XnY. All of their children will receive the recessive gene from their mother. In the males, this means that they will be colorblind, because the chromosome they get from their father will by the Y chromosome. The daughters, however, will get the Xn gene, which is dominant and will override the gene for colorblindness. Thus, all of the couple's sons will be colorblind, and none of their daughters will be.


What is a example of a homozygous?

Any recessive phenotype which is exhibited. Cystic Fibrosis requires both versions of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene to be defective (i.e. they are homozygous) on both pairs of chromosome 7. Conversely having both normal CFTR genes is also an example of a homozygous configuration. Heterozygous would be having one normal and one defective gene i.e. being a carrier of the CF gene.


Can you have a gene that is not expressed?

not usually, most books fit into the normal genres: mystery, fiction, nonfiction, adventure etc. I believe this person is referring to "genes," not "genres." To answer the question, then: yes, you can have genes that are not expressed. Recessive genes, for example, will not be expressed in heterozygous individuals; they will only be expressed in homozygous recessive individuals. For example; if you have the genotype Aa, the recessive gene - "a" - will not be expressed because the genotype contains a dominant allele, and the dominant allele will always be the one expressed. The only way that the "a" allele will be expressed is, again, if you are homozygous for that recessive gene (your genotype would be aa).


Two people who have normal arches produced a child who has flat feet what is the child's genotype?

Child's genotype would be homozygous recessive alleles (nn) and parents would both have heterozygous dominant alleles (Nn).


What are some recessive traits?

grey, green, hazel, blue eyes normal vision nearsightedness night blindness color blindness* blonde, light, red hair red hair straight hair baldness* normal hairline no dimples attached earlobes no freckles thin lips normal number normal digits normal digits normal joints normal proportion normal thumb normal joints susceptibility to poison ivy albinism hemophilia* congenital deafness deaf mutism phenylketonuria (PKU) * sex-linked characteristic


Why can't males be carriers in X-linked gene inheritance What is a carrier?

A carrier is an individual which is heterozygous (greek, roughly translating; 'different' 'genes') for a certain trait, eg: Bb. The dominant gene will be expressed and the organism will appear no different from a homozygous dominant individual (BB). However, through sexual reproduction, 2 carriers (or a carrier and a homozygous recessive, eg bb) can give rise to homozygous recessive offspring, which will express the recessive characteristic as a result. Genes that exist on the X chromosome however, are only present in 1 form in normal males, because normal males have only 1 X chromosome (so they can either be Xy or xy). For this reason, males cannot be carriers for X-linked conditions, they will be 'sufferers' if they have the recessive X-linked gene, or normal individuals if they possess the dominant X-linked gene. Males are said to be hemizygous when it comes to X-linked genes - they only ever have 1 gene and express it.


Color blindness is an X-linked recessive trait A color-blind man has a daughter with normal color vision She mates with a male who has normal color vision What is the expected phenotypic ratio of t?

The phenotypic ratio will be 1:3.his son will be color blind.


A woman who has a color-blind mother and a father with normal color vision marries a carrier man with normal vision This couple has a son What is the chance that the son is color-blind?

The son will be color-blind. Color-blindness is a recessive trait found on the X-chromosome, and for someone to be color-blind all present X-chromosomes MUST have the recessive trait. Therefore, a son from a color-blind mother (who receives the trait from his mother on the X-chromosome) will always be color-blind, regardless of the state of the father (who can only give his son a Y-chromosome). This is why color-blindness is more commonly found in men than in women, since men only require one X while women must have two X carrying the trait present. All of the daughters of this couple will be carriers of color-blindness, but will not be color-blind.


How many alleles for color blindness?

color blindness is an x linkedrecessive gene, meaning it is only carried on the x chromosome, not the y, and it is recessiveXC = Allele for normal color visionXc= Allele for color blindness since it is a recessive trait, the person must have 2 alleles for color blindness if female ( Xc Xc ) or just one if male ( Xc Y )Because of this, colorblindness is found more often in males than it is in females


Can an A positive and an A positive have a O negative baby?

Yes, they can, since both parents can carry the "hidden" recessive gene that is not expressed and pass it on to their children. The genotyping goes as follows: Possible alleles for type A blood: Ao (heterozygous) or AA (homozygous) Possible alleles for type O blood: oo (the only possibility in normal people would be recessive homozygous). If both parents are Ao, then both are type A but pass on their o gene to their child. The odds this happening are 1 in 4. For type Rh positive blood: Pn (heterozygous) or PP (homozygous) And for type Rh negative blood: nn (the only possibility in normal people would be recessive homozygous). If both parents are Pn, then both are positive but pass on their negative gene to their child. The odds this happening are also 1 in 4. The odds of getting a normal child that is both type O and negative from parents with those genotypes is 1 in 16 (1/4 times 1/4)


How are mutations returned to normal in an organism?

Mutations on recessive genes return to normal in an organism


A woman who isn’t colorblind but has an allele for color blindness reproduces with a man who has normal vision What is the chance that they’ll have a colorblind daughter?

Inheritance Of Color Blindness In Men & WomenSex-Linked Genes Located On X Chromosome:+ = Normal Vision (Dominant)o = Color Blindness (Recessive)SexColor-blindNormal VisionMaleXoYX+YFemaleXoXoX+X+ X+XoCross Between A Color-blind Man (XoY) andHeterozygous Normal Vision Woman (X+Xo)GametesXoYoX+X+XoX+YXoXoXoXoYIn the above cross, four different possible offspring are produced:XoY: Color-blind Boy (1/4 or 25%)X+Y Normal Vision Boy (1/4 or 25%)XoXo Color-blind Girl (1/4 or 25%)X+Xo Heterozygous Normal Vision Girl (1/4 or 25%)Note: The heterozygous normal vision girl carries the recessive gene forcolor blindness. On the average, she will pass this gene on to half of hersons and half of her daughters.


What is the difference between a dominant and a recessive allele?

Dominant is an allele that can be expressed in a heterozygous individual (ie. Bb) or homozygous dominant (ie. BB). Recessive on other hand are traits that will only be expressed in a homozygous recessive (ie. bb) condition. Under normal circumstances, dominant alleles are the ones expressed in the phenotype, while the recessive allele is not. For example (an extremely simplified example) an heterozygous individual for eye color. (genotype Bb), has one dominant allele, 'B', and one recessive allele, 'b'. Given that B is for brown eyes, and b is for blue eyes, that individual's phenotype would be expressed as brown eyes (and be recessive for blue eyes). Organisms receive one allele for each trait from each parent, thus you have two alleles for each trait.


What is the difference between a dominate allele and a recessive allele?

Dominant is an allele that can be expressed in a heterozygous individual (ie. Bb) or homozygous dominant (ie. BB). Recessive on other hand are traits that will only be expressed in a homozygous recessive (ie. bb) condition. Under normal circumstances, dominant alleles are the ones expressed in the phenotype, while the recessive allele is not. For example (an extremely simplified example) an heterozygous individual for eye color. (genotype Bb), has one dominant allele, 'B', and one recessive allele, 'b'. Given that B is for brown eyes, and b is for blue eyes, that individual's phenotype would be expressed as brown eyes (and be recessive for blue eyes). Organisms receive one allele for each trait from each parent, thus you have two alleles for each trait.


Can a normal homozygous individual produce offspring with sickle-cell anemia?

A normal homozygous individual can't produce offspring with sickle cell anemia. Both parents must carry the trait to have an offspring with the illness.


Show the results for the following crosses using punnet squares and the information in the accompanying figure homozygous short homozygous colorpoint x homozygous long homozygous normal?

The results for the following can not be shown unless the following information is provided. Without this there is no way to show the results of it.


1 in drosophila the allele for normal length wings is dominant over the allele for vestigial wings In populations of 1000 individuals 360 show the recessive phenotype How many individuals would you?

160 homozygous dominant individuals and 480 heterozygous individuals


How can immigration and emigration alter allele frequencies in a population?

Let us say you have three alleles in a population of beetles. Two colors; brown is recessive to green. Thus you have; GG, which is homozygous dominant and green, you have Gb, which is heterozygous and also green. Then you have bb, which is homozygous recessive. This is your population of beetles. What do you think the allele frequency would be if GG, the homozygous dominant, either immigrated, or emigrated out of or into your population of beetles? Since the frequency of Gb and bb would necessarily go down statistically you would see more green morphologies and a change in genetic allele frequency. Assuming normal conditions.


A mother has one allele for color blindness and one Allele or normal vision what is the probability that her Gamete Will have the Allele for the color blindness?

50%