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If a US citizen marries a Mexican citizen in Mexico can they both return to the US?

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Answered 2009-09-03 17:05:04

sure you can return back to the US

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He or she could, but his or her partner must make the appropriate arrangements so that she or he acquires the US citizenship. Namely, contacting the American embassy in Mexico and begin such legal process.


In return the colonists agreed to learn Spanish, convert to Catholicism-the religion of Mexico-and obey Mexican law.


when a illegal immigrant marries a u.s. citizen he or she becomes a u.s. citizen and does not have to return to his or her country I don't think that it's entirely true. If you don't have any papers, then you can not become a US citizen UNLESS you have a visa or greencard.


Yes, as long as he/she has a valid passport and can corroborate reason of visit, staying time and the means to return to Mexico (i.e. a valid reservation and return ticket).


The citizen of Gonzales refused to return a small cannon that was on loan from the Mexican Army.


It you are an American citizen, you don't need any document besides your passport, which is actually needed for your return into the United States. If you are not American and are reaching Mexico through the United States, you would need the American visa to enter Mexico; then you will have to request a Mexican visa that can be provided on the spot by the immigration agents.




Land lost to the U.S. during the Mexican-American War.


Parts of the US they lost in Mexican-American war 1848


The supposed benefit would have been the return of lost territories during the Mexican-American War (1846-1848). Specifically, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. It however was unfeasible because Mexico was in the middle of its Mexican Revolution (1910-1921).


In Egpyt, yes. A US citizen may NEVER marry more than one person, regardless of where that occurs, and even if it is legal in that country. If you return to the United States only your first marriage will be recognized.


1848 Mexico recognized Texas was part of the US and that the Rio Grande was the border of the two nations. They ceded the Mexican Cession. The US, in return, paid Mexico about $18 million for claims and to protect the Mexicans who lived in Texas and the Mexican Cession.


go to the immigration office in whatever Mexican state you are in. you need a passport, and visa to file for a marriage permit. once you have permission the office will ask you to pay a fee at the bank. the bank will sign your paper, return to the immigration office they will give a different paper of permission which you take to the church or the civil office, where ever you choose to get married. It will take several months, but $tipping$ the right people will help speed things up.


Germany's proposal that upon an alliance with Mexico, it would ensure the return of Mexican land lost to the United States.


He was called by the Mexican congress to defend Mexico from what they saw was an invasion from the United States.


i am American, i was born in America, as was my son, and my husband is mexican. .. he has been banned for 5 years, it is different with each case & each judge


No.On presenting their passport, the immigration authorities will detain them and deport them. They will not be allowed to return.Well.... If they are already in the United States illegally, and are a Mexican citizen (as the Mexican Passport would indicate), then taking a flight from the US to Mexico is no problem. No one would check their US immigration status when departing, and, as a holder of a valid Mexican passport, they would be fine to enter Mexico.Now, on the return leg (even if it was the same round-trip ticket), they would have to pass through US immigration, and, without a valid visa, they would be held and deported.That is, the US Immigration services aren't going to stop someone from leaving the country, even if they were here illegally. They're concerned with people entering the country (or, who have been caught via other means already inside the U.S.)


Yes, but the illegal immigrant must seek a lawyer to help them become a citizen. The illegal may even have to return to their native country and await citzenship rights to the U.S. but just because an illegal marries a citizen does not give them a free pass. It may however, speed up the process.


You can always return to a country of which you are a citizen. Lack of a current passport is only an impediment to travel to countries of which you are not a citizen.


The regions of the US that it lost as results of the Texas War of Independence and the Mexican-American War.


There are not laws that prevent a citizen from marrying a foreign national who is unlawfully present in the U.S. It is unlikely that an undocumented immigrant would have the identification required by state law, such as a SS#. Be that as it may, the citizen spouse would not be able to file an application for the non-citizen spouse's permanent resident status, because he was in the country illegally. The non-citizen spouse must return to Mexico and the required USCIS laws must be followed before he can legally reenter the U.S. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, http://www.uscis.gov


According to the history books (which is not necessary the true), it was a German telegram sent to the Mexican government, which was intercept by the US. Basically, Germany was trying to get Mexico to join them to attack the US because of proximity of the two countries. In return if victory was achieved, Germany would have return the territory the US took from Mexico. At the end, Mexico declined the offer because it was unble to fight two war at the same time (Mexican Revolution 1910-20) .


Yes, provided you have all border entry/exit stamps on your passport.




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