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2008-07-16 04:26:58
2008-07-16 04:26:58

First of all you are really lucky that this accident was not your fault. The person who was At Fault is responsible for your vehicle damages. If he is insured, then it is his insurance company that is responsible. ** Depending on your states laws, you can loose your drivers license for up to a year for not having insurance and being involved in an accident. If you received a citation at the scene of the accident for no insurance, you need to pay for that also.

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2017-10-04 17:32:35
2017-10-04 17:32:35

Various state laws may limit what type of damages you can collect. Also, when you do start to shop for a policy your rates will be higher. In a no-fault state, each driver must seek compensation from their own insurer and your ability to sue for damages is limited.

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Related Questions


The at fault driver is responsible regardless of who has or does not have insurance. You were at fault, you get the bill. Fortunately though you have insurance. So they get the bill.


Even if a driver was uninsured, the driver who was at fault is responsible for paying for repairs. Not having insurance does not take away responsibility.



If you have an accident with an uninsured vehicle, you and your insurance company are still liable for all damages, even though the other vehicle has no insurance. The only thing that will happen to the other driver is a citation for driving with no insurance.


If the accident was caused by the uninsured driver than the uninsured driver is definitely still responsible.


You hope that the other driver responsible in the crash has insurance that covers uninsured drivers and then you sue your friend!


Since you are the only person with insurance it would be your insurance that pays, if your policy says this situation is covered. It depends on your insurance policy. Some cover you, others don't


You need to have uninsured motorist insurance as a rider on your insurance. If not you will have to sue the uninsured driver.



Usually an uninsured motorist accident is not chargeable against insured in any way. Your rates should not be effected at all with most insurance companies.


If all you have is uninsured motorists then no it will not pay. you need liability insurance to pay for damaged caused to another. Liability is what your supposed to have.



I hope you had insurance for this. The uninsured motorist will probably be broke


Uninsured motorist covers you in the case you are in an accident with another driver that does not have insurance. Comprehensive coverage is what will pay when you hit a deer.


Your question is confusing. The way I read it, the one that caused the accident was uninsured, so how can that person's insurance company pay for your rental car? He has no insurance company.


They will have to take the uninsured driver to court. Or if you have uninsured driver policy with your insurance, they will pay it.


Whether in Virginia or another state, uninsured motorist insurance is often pushed aside by drivers. Unfortunately for those drivers, uninsured motorist insurance could come in handy in the case of an accident where the other driver involved does not have insurance. In Virginia, uninsured motorist insurance is actually mandatory. Residents are required to purchase uninsured motorist insurance as part of their auto insurance plan. Fortunately for residents of Virginia, uninsured motorist insurance can help protect from health care costs and other costs associate with an accident that the driver is not at fault for. Residents of Virginia are required to purchase 25/50/20 of uninsured motorist insurance with their auto insurance policy. This amount of insurance is purchased in order to cover bodily injury and damage to property costs associated with an accident. Additionally, uninsured motorist insurance can help pay for lost wages and other medical bills as a result of an accident. While uninsured motorist insurance may seem like an extra or unnecessary costs, statistics have shown that nearly 15 percent of drivers on the road do not carry liability insurance. In the case of an accident in which a driver does not have insurance, the driver at fault would be required to pay for any and all costs. If they can't, it becomes the responsibility of the other driver involved in the accident. It doesn't matter if the driver was at fault or not. In Virginia, drivers have the option of purchasing a deductible for uninsured motorist insurance. The deductible is the price that a driver is willing to pay out of pocket if they have an encounter with an uninsured driver that can not pay for damages and or medical bills. Fortunately, as it is mandatory in Virginia, purchasing uninsured motorist insurance or paying for a deductible is relatively inexpensive. As with all types of auto insurance, prices will vary depending on the insurance company. For best deals on uninsured motorist protection rates, it's best to shop around.


Same as if it where 2 cars. The uninsured driver will be sited and then your insurance will pay for the repairs and try and collect from the uninsured driver, if you have uninsured or underinsured coverage, if not you can take the uninsured driver to small claims court.


Typically, the uninsured driver will be cited for it, and your insurance co. is liable for the damages.


The uninsured part would mean that the person or persons responsible would have to pay for it. If they have an accident in someone elses car they will probably be questioned in court.


yes. Unfortunately many of the people who are responsible for accidents are irrsponsible in their personal lives, have no insurance and have nothing of value. Often you don't get anything from the uninsured drivers who cause your accidents.


No. The state is not responsible for the accident or the driver. You can file suit against the uninsured motorist.


As you failed to tke a insurance, you will have to pay from your pocket entirely.


The owner of the car that caused your damages will be responsible to pay damages to you unless you live in a no-fault state. In that case, your insurance pays for your damages.




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