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2005-07-08 22:45:54
2005-07-08 22:45:54

Well now, you state that it WAS repoed, so yes you can be charged a repo fee for a repo performed.

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Sorry, but there is nothing to fight. The only legitimate reason to park in a handicapped designated parking place is that you, or one of the passengers at that time, is handicapped and the vehicle was displaying a handicapped parking permit. "Was the vehicle parked in a handicapped spot?" is a yes or no question. "Did the vehicle display a properly authorized handicapped permit?" is a yes or no question. If the first answer is yes, and the second answer is no, there is nothing to argue, quilty as charged. If the answers are different, then you can fight the ticket.


the fine is aproximatly $2,000 why were you in a handicapped parking spot? if you are a repeat offender the fine is something like $10,000


The actual parking space or the parking decal ?? The parking space istelf has to be marked on the ground and a sign stating that it is a handicapped area - both have to be present. The parking decal is also assigned to the handicapped drivers license - so by having a police officer run the parking decal it will state who the driver is that has been assigned that decal.


Review Texas law about handicapped access to condominiums. Your association may be obligated to provide handicap access, but it may not be required to make the parking spaces available at exactly the place you want them. It's a good idea for you -- assuming that you are a handicapped owner -- to work this out with your board of directors.


Any business that provides public parking is required to provide handicapped parking.


If you are not handicapped, do not park there. If you are handicapped, you must have a decal on your license plate or a permit hanging from your mirror.


ha-ha :) I never thought about that. Maybe some non-handicapped people got mad because the handicapped have the "good" parking spots so they wanted "good" locations for the cart returns. I think they should have a cart return beside each handicapped parking spots and then the rest wherever they please between all of the other parking spaces. (Why would someone get mad over not having a "good" parking spot? so instead of walking a short distance further they steal a handicapped parking space? I don't know, we live in such an odd community.)



If you strike him - you are at fault. He can be charged with the No Parking violation but YOU are charged with the collision.


You must have a handicapped space for each unit specifically intended for a handicapped person. Other wise, one handicapped space per forty normal parking spaces.


Definitely yes. In many cases (such as the building I live in) the residents have to pay a monthly or yearly parking fee to the landlord or owner. Some of them may be designated handicapped parking spaces. A guest has no right to occupy the residents' paid-for parking spots. A private residential parking lot is private property, and the landlord or owner has the right to restrict parking as they see fit. A guest, even with a handicapped placard, runs the risk of having their car towed away if they park in a space reserved for residents.


No, anyone can own a handicapped vehicle. However, if you wish to use a handicapped parking space you must obtain a permit through the DMV.


No it is not a felony, but it is a darn expensive misdemeanor.


ANYONE can drive a vehicle displaying handicapped plates - HOWEVER - if you are not the disabled owner do not attempt to park in a handicapped parking space. If you are challenged, the vehicle's registration card will quickly disclose that you are not the registered owner and, therefore, NOT authorized to use handicapped parking privileges.


In the city of St. Louis, Missouri, parking in a handicapped zone is a Class 4 violation. The fine for doing so without a handicap placard is $75.


Bipolar disorder, by itself, would not qualify a person for a handicapped parking card; handicapped spaces are reserved for people who have physical disabilities that make walking difficult or impossible.It is possible for someone to have bipolar disorder and a qualifying physical medical condition, however, in which case they may receive a parking card if a doctor recommends one.


how much will a ticket cost for parking in a handicapped zone in merrillville, Indiana


You are allowed to park in handicapped parking spaces.


The parking lot is permitting handicapped cars to enter.


Depending on the location of the condominium, state law, county law or city law may require minimum handicapped parking stalls and other amenities specifically to accommodate disabled persons.


Striped area on the pavement means no parking. Ever. Vehicles are not supposed to be on that pavement. There is no requirement that there is a sign for handicapped parking, it must be clearly marked. And if it is painted on the pavement and it isn't covered with snow, there is no excuse.


Yes. Parking violations are governed by State and City laws, regardless of location.Added: Quite often, especially in the case of shopping center parking lots, the property management company has given blanket authority for local police to come on their property specifically to enforce the handicapped parking regulations.


In almost all cases, handicapped parking permits and placards can only be obtained from a local government office. Depending on where you live, handicapped parking permits may be issued by your city or your state.


Yes. And the association may be required to adjust handicapped parking spaces/ slots/ rules depending on the requirements of any handicapped resident. Your state condominium law, or state housing law for handicapped persons may apply. If the resident is a tenant, however, the expense of accommodation may be passed along to the owner, who enjoys the revenue stream from the tenant.



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