Rules of the Road

If you hit an unlicensed driver will your insurance pay for damages to his car?

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2014-06-27 21:25:05
2014-06-27 21:25:05

This will depend on the type of insurance coverage. The insurance company can decide to go to court and argue that since the driver was uninsured, then they should not be liable for damages.

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Let's see if I can follow this. Insurance company A is at fault because of actions caused by driver A. Driver B who is not at fault is injured, but is unlicensed, and Auto B has been totalled. Insurance company A is going to have to pay damages to Driver B for property damage as well as for injuries because Driver A is deemed at fault. The fact that Driver B is unlicensed is a non-moving violation and Driver B will have to pay a substantial fines for these issues.


The unlicensed driver is responsible for all damages. If they are a minor the parents may be forced to take responsibility. Sadly, the owner of the vehicle MUST make any insurance claims they are eligible to make. The owner can ask the unlicensed driver to pay any excess on the insurance and even take them to court if they refuse to pay it. The driver of the vehicle is responsible to pay any amounts not covered by the vehicles owners insurance, including damages to the car. If the insurance premium goes up or you loose your no claim bonus then I'm sorry but the driver is not liable for that. If the unlicensed driver drove the vehicle without permission from the vehicle owner then the vehicle owner must report that the car was stolen at the time of the accident, then provide the insurance company with the police report number (you can tell the police you don't want to press charges). Under these circumstances even if the insurance company pays out damages for the vehicle they may chase the unlicensed driver to pay them back.


You can try to sue the unlicensed driver, but if they don't have the money to pay any damages awarded, you are well and truly up the creek.


Yes, but the rates will probably go up. Loaning a vehicle to an unlicenced driver is risky behavior that insurance companies don't generallly like.


Maybe. Did the unlicensed driver have your permission to be operating the car when the accident occurred? If so, maybe not.


The rules and laws of insurance vary from state to state but generally speaking it is the automobile that is insured not the driver. So if your friend allows you to drive her insured car and you are involved in an accident you are covered under her policy(((IF her insurance policy does not stipulate restrictions banning unlicensed drivers from operating the vehicle))) in which case her insurance may not cover damages done to her vehicle or injuries to the unlicensed driver.


You must be licensed to drive, or have a permit and a licensed driver with you. Otherwise, there are legal consequences for that driver. The insurance company may not pay for any damages depending on the policy.


If you have comprehensive insurance, your policy will cover the damages (less a deductable). In this case, your insurance company will sue the at fault driver. You can also sue the at fault driver for damages (if you do not have comprehensive).


The driver at fault is always responsible for damages incurred during an accident. The at fault insurance company is responsible for damages to your car.


when you get the insurance you can register your daughter as an autorized driver and the insurance will cover for the damages.


In the UK the insurance company would not accept liability except under exceptional circumstances


My insurance canceled uninsured person hits someone in rear what happens to me


Yes I think so since you were the driver. The insurance covers the driver and not necessarily the car.


Generally, the owner of the insured car is held liable for any damages or losses involved after an accident. So if you want to file a claim for compensation after a crash, it is better to file it with the owner of the insured car or his insurance company. The adult unlicensed driver however, can be held liable criminally if there was death or injury involved.


Your insurance will likely cover the liability costs less deductibles. You may be forced to file charges for vehicle theft against the unlicensed driver and your insurance company may also sue him.


The Driver "and" the Vehicle Owner are both jointly and severally liable for all damages. She should contact her Insurance Agent for advice as to whether or not the Auto Insurance Policy will provide coverage for the unlicensed driver


You cannot get car insurance if you do not have a license because you cannot legally drive.


When a car is uninsured and it involved in an accident, the owner of the car is responsible for its damages and that of the other involved cars. This rule applies even if the driver has his own insurance cover on a different car.


If the driver of the car you were in was at fault and had no insurance you are out of luck. your only recourse if to sue the person who you were driving with to recover damages. If your driver was not at fault but had no insurance the other parties insurance would have to cover your damages. The lesson is not to ride with people who do not carry auto insurance, ever.


Yes, (subject to policy exclusions and your state law regarding uninsured unlicensed drivers), the person that is negligent, at fault is the one responsible for the damages to the 'innocent' party. Regardless of their licensing/insurance in most cases.


Are you sure that that's driver and not just a queer example of nondriver? Yes I am sure it is driver


If the drive is not found, your insurance will have to cover the damages. When the guy is found, press charges and sue him for damages.


If this unlicensed driver was driving your car with your knowledge, you are screwed. But if you mean an unlicensed driver hit your car, if you have full coverage you should be able to collect on your insurance. The insurance will make the check to the leinholder and they will give you any excess or expect you to make up any shortage to pay off the loan. In some cases, if you did give permission for the uninsured driver, your insurance company will pay for the loss but make you sign an exclusion stating that the driver will not be covered in the future for any reason. You would be liable for full cost if it happens again. You can also expect a spike in your rates if they reside with you.


It will depend on the driver's car insurance company. In case that driver gets into a car accident, it would be presumed his car insurance will step in to settle the damages.


Liability insurance is an especially important type of car insurance because it covers damages that are your (the driver) fault.



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