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Answered 2016-11-06 21:00:15

That depends how close the star is to a supermassive black hole. And how close they can be at the closest, without getting destroyed, would depend on the mass of the supermassive black hole. There are several stars that orbit Sag A* in a few years - something around 10-15 years. However, I think it is theoretically possible for a star to get even closer, and therefore orbit in less time.For information about orbits in general, take a look at Kepler's laws, especially Kepler's Third Law.

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Answered 2016-12-15 13:51:20

Just as the orbital period of the planets in the Solar System depend on the planets' distances from the sun, the answer to this question depends on how close to the black hole the star is.

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It seems unlikely that this will occur before our Milky Way galaxy collides with Andromeda. Our solar system seems to be safely in orbit around the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, but in 4 billion years, when Andromeda (with its OWN supermassive black hole) collides with the Milky Way, it might possibly happen.


It depends on the mass of the black hole. Typical lifetimes are ten to the power 100 years.


The nearest supermassive black hole is at the center of our galaxy about 26,000 light years away.


The supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way is at a distance of about 28,000 light-years. The nearest known stellar black hole is at a distance of about 3000 light-years.


millions of black holes are in all of the galaxies, and in the center of all large galaxies is an enormous black hole that makes all the stars go around it. the power was a million times greater 350 years ago. this cycle will repeat over again. Scientists have come to believe that there is very probably a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, and that there may be supermassive black holes at the centers of many galaxies.


Stars often come in groups of two or more. In the case of a binary star (two stars), the two stars move around their common center of mass - one complete orbit every few hours, days, years, or even thousands of years - just like the planets orbit the Sun. Each of these stars would be the "companion" of the other one. One of these stars can become a black hole; in that case, the gravitational situation doesn't really change - the two (the black hole and the star, in this case) will continue orbiting their common center of mass.


Supermassive stars have extremely short lifespans, ranging from some 50 million years to a mere million years.


None, really. At least, for us, and now. A black hole can be dangerous if it's very massive (such as a supermassive black hole). But mainly, a black hole would be completely harmless, unless it gets close - and the nearest known black hole is at a distance of about 3000 light-years. Even a supermassive black hole would be harmless at such a distance.


There are many stellar mass black holes scattered throughout the galaxy. There is a supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center about 26,000 light years away.


Yes. The nearest known black hole is about 3,000 light years away in the system V616 Monocerotis. There is a probably supermassive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, about 26,000 light years away.


Traveling at the speed of light, it would take roughly ten million Earth days (about 27,000 years plus or minus a thousand years) to reach the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's core.


No - In fact, the Chandra X-ray Observatory detected a jet of X-rays from a supermassive black hole 12.4 billion light years from Earth.


Assuming you are referring to the supermassive black hole which is thought to be at the center of our own galaxy, the distance is estimated to be between 24,500 and 27,300 light-years.


"Main sequence" stars are no longer new, and are just cookin' along for millions of years. "Main sequence" stars, depending on their weight and whether they orbit another nearby star can get old and become red dwarfs, white dwarfs, black dwarfs, neutron stars, novas, or super-novas.


Stars are formed when elevation gass escapes the sun. They will then catch heat from planets, the planets orbit will then place the stars in a special order. Then the star will glow for 10,000 years then will die.


The sun can't orbit itself. Stars in binary or trinary systems, however, do orbit each other. Depending on the distance and a few other factors, this can take hundreds if not thousands of years for one orbit.


Mercury, Days to orbit sun = 87.97 Years to orbit sun= 0.24Venus, Days to orbit sun = 224.70 Years to orbit sun= 0.62Earth, Days to orbit sun = 365.26 Years to orbit sun= 1.00Mars, Days to orbit sun = 686.97 Years to orbit sun= 1.88Jupiter, Days to orbit sun = 4331.57 Years to orbit sun= 11.86Saturn, Days to orbit sun = 10759.22 Years to orbit sun= 29.46Uranus, Days to orbit sun = 30799.10 Years to orbit sun= 84.32Neptune, Days to orbit sun = 60190.00 Years to orbit sun= 164.79


Black holes are expected to evaporate eventually. This takes a very, very long time - much longer than the current age of the Universe. For a stellar black hole, this evaporation would take about 10 to the power 64 years; for a supermassive black hole, about 10 to the power 100 years.


The closest KNOWN black hole is at a distance of 3000 light-years. It seems very likely (to me, at least) that there are black holes that are closer to us, but that haven't been discovered yet. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way is at a distance of about 28,000 light-years.


A black hole of the mass of the Sun will take somewhere around 1067 years to evaporate. A supermassive black hole can take 10100 years or more to evaporate. If you write it out, this latter is a 1, followed by 100 zeros; in any case, much longer than the current age of the Universe.


No. This supermassive black hole has a mass of 4 million times the mass of the Sun (well, that's the latest estimate), and it is at a distance of 30,000 light-years. There is no reason to believe we are getting near it in the foreseeable future.Also, it is part of the structure of our galaxy; why would we be disturbed by its presence? We should be grateful it is there.


It is not currently known how a supermassive black hole forms, or how long it takes. However, since they are present in early galaxies, they must have formed soon after the galaxy (at the lastest), in a fairly short time. I would guess they took no more than a few hundred million years to form, perhaps even less.


Mercury, Days to orbit sun = 87.97 Years to orbit sun= 0.24 Venus, Days to orbit sun = 224.70 Years to orbit sun= 0.62 Earth, Days to orbit sun = 365.26 Years to orbit sun= 1.00 Mars, Days to orbit sun = 686.97 Years to orbit sun= 1.88 Jupiter, Days to orbit sun = 4331.57 Years to orbit sun= 11.86 Saturn, Days to orbit sun = 10759.22 Years to orbit sun= 29.46 Uranus, Days to orbit sun = 30799.10 Years to orbit sun= 84.32 Neptune, Days to orbit sun = 60190.00 Years to orbit sun= 164.79


Mercury, Days to orbit sun = 87.97 Years to orbit sun= 0.24Venus, Days to orbit sun = 224.70 Years to orbit sun= 0.62Earth, Days to orbit sun = 365.26 Years to orbit sun= 1.00Mars, Days to orbit sun = 686.97 Years to orbit sun= 1.88Jupiter, Days to orbit sun = 4331.57 Years to orbit sun= 11.86Saturn, Days to orbit sun = 10759.22 Years to orbit sun= 29.46Uranus, Days to orbit sun = 30799.10 Years to orbit sun= 84.32Neptune, Days to orbit sun = 60190.00 Years to orbit sun= 164.79


That depends a lot on the mass of the black hole. The smaller black holes will evaporate more quickly. A stellar black hole (a few times the mass of the Sun) is expected to live approximately 1066 years, while a supermassive black hole might survive something like 10100 years before evaporating completely.



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