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Is null node equal to leaf node?

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2015-02-06 16:36:17
2015-02-06 16:36:17

No. A leaf node is a node that has no child nodes. A null node is a node pointer that points to the null address (address zero). Since a leaf node has no children, its child nodes are null nodes.

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2015-03-05 14:52:35
2015-03-05 14:52:35

No. A null node is a node pointer that holds the null value (zero). A leaf node is simply a node that has no children. Thus in a binary tree, a leaf node would hold two null nodes.

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In this representation, each node contains two pointers, one pointing to its parent (null in the case of root node) and the other pointing to its child node (null in the case of leaf nodes).


#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> /* A binary tree node has data, pointer to left child and a pointer to right child */ struct node { int data; struct node* left; struct node* right; }; /* Function to get the count of leaf nodes in a binary tree*/ unsigned int getLeafCount(struct node* node) { if(node NULL && node->right==NULL) return 1; else return getLeafCount(node->left)+ getLeafCount(node->right); } /* Helper function that allocates a new node with the given data and NULL left and right pointers. */ struct node* newNode(int data) { struct node* node = (struct node*) malloc(sizeof(struct node)); node->data = data; node->left = NULL; node->right = NULL; return(node); } /*Driver program to test above functions*/ int main() { /*create a tree*/ struct node *root = newNode(1); root->left = newNode(2); root->right = newNode(3); root->left->left = newNode(4); root->left->right = newNode(5); /*get leaf count of the above created tree*/ printf("Leaf count of the tree is %d", getLeafCount(root)); getchar(); return 0; }


for (node=head; node!=null; node=node->next) printnode(node);


int countleaves(struct node* root){ if(root!=null) { countleaves(root->left); if(root->left==NULL&&root->right==NULL) { count++; } countleaves(root->right); } }


height and depth of a tree is equal... but height and depth of a node is not equal because... the height is calculated by traversing from leaf to the given node depth is calculated from traversal from root to the given node.....


THE POINT FROM WHERE THE LEAF ARISES IS KNOWN AS NODE. THE DISTANCE between 2 consequitive nodes is known as internode.. from a node leaf arises but from the internode no leaf arises internode is a part of stem as node is not but is a part of leaf


as far as i know u have 4 cases for the node u wanna delete1.It's a leaf (has no children)2.It has only left child3.it has only right child4.it has both children ,left and rightnow, let's work on it :>set a pointer node to the rootwhile the element to be deleted doesnt equal the pointerif it's smaller, move the pointer to the left subtreeif it's large , move the pointer to the right subtreeif pointer reached the end of the tree , null, break the loop (unluckly that means u didnt find the element that should be removed)end while //(now u must have found the target, the while condition is breaked normally)// this is case 4if both children don't equal nullget the most left node in the subtree of the pointer nodeassign its value to the pointer node.remove it (set that most left thing to equal null)//...case 2if pointer node.right only equals nullpointer node = pointer node.left//...case3if pointer node.left only equals nullpointer node = pointer node.right//... case 1if pointer node.left and .right equals nullpointer node.data = nullmaybe it doesnt look like any algorithm style ,sorry for that, that's as far as i knw, i doubt case 4 anyways..


struct node{ int data; struct node *left, *right; }; typedef struct node node; non recursive method : main() { node * root = NULL , *new = NULL *temp1 =NULL , * temp2 = NULL; int num =1; printf(" Enter the elements of the tree( enter 0 to exit)\n"); while(1) { scanf("%d", &num); if(num==0) break; new = malloc(sizeof(node)); new->left = new->right = NULL; new->data = num; if( root NULL) root->left = new; else insert( new,root->left); } }


Induction: 1. A tree of one node has two NULL-pointers. 2. Whenever you add a node to a tree, you remove one NULL-pointer (from the parent of the new node), and add two (the child's of the new node) in the same time.


Since a binary search tree is ordered to start with, to find the largest node simply traverse the tree from the root, choosing only the right node (assuming right is greater and left is less) until you reach a node with no right node. You will then be at the largest node.for (node=root; node!= NULL&&node->right != NULL; node=node->right);This loop will do this. There is no body because all the work is done in the control expressions.


There must be no NULL links in a linked list except in the tail node (because nothing comes after the tail). In doubly-linked lists, the head node also has a NULL link because nothing comes before the head. Every node in a list must be reachable from the previous (or next) node in the list, except the head node which is the only node we must keep track of. A NULL link would render all nodes that follow it unreachable, resulting in a resource leak -- unless we take steps to keep track of the node that would have come next before breaking the link to it. That node becomes the head node of another list.


Header node is a pointer variable of the structure type. This node contains the address of the first node of the linked list. If this node contains NULL, then this shows that linked list is empty.


Queues are a first in first out structure (FIFO). This means all extractions occur at the head of the list and all insertions occur at the tail. This requires that you maintain pointers to the head and tail node to allow constant time insertion and extraction of nodes. The nodes themselves are singly linked, each pointing to the next node. The tail node always points to NULL until a new node is insert, which the tail points to. The new node then becomes the tail. When extracting a head node, its next node (which may be NULL if it is also the last node) becomes the new head of the list. If the head is NULL, the tail is also set to NULL.


void delete_last (node **head) { node *tmp = *head; node *prev = NULL; if (!tmp) { } else if (!tmp->next) { free(tmp); *head = NULL; } else { while (tmp->next) { prev = tmp; tmp = tmp->next; } prev->next = NULL; free(tmp); } return; }


_node* search (_node* head, _key key) { _node* node; for (node=head; node != NULL;;) { if (key == node->key) return node; else if (key < node.>key) node = node->left; else node = node->right; } return node; }


int numNodes = 0; Node current = root; // if root is null, the number of nodes is 0 if(current != null) { // if root is not null, we have at least one node numNodes = 1; // count all nodes while(current .next != null) { ++numNodes; current = current.next; } }


node *SLSortWiseInsert(node *START, int data) { node *newnode; if(START NULL)) { printf("Inside this condition\n"); newnode = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node)); newnode->data = data; newnode->link = NULL; START->link = newnode; return START; } START->link = SLSortWiseInsert(START->link,data); return START; }


The primary difference is that the last node in a circular queue points to the head node (as its next node). In a non-circular queue, the last node points to NULL.


The petiole is the base of a leaf that is not a stem because it has a leaf node that consists of a leaf axil, a sheath and a stipule.It is use to hold the leaf in place and to carry nutriens to the leaf.The leaf node is bellow the petiole and connects the petiole to the stem.


It will be come a terminal node. Normally we call terminal nodes leaf nodes because a leaf has no branches other than its parent.


if the last node contains the address of head node instead of null then it is a circular linked llist...


A node in binary tree is any element of the tree itself that could be either a root, leaf, or non-leaf.


In computer programming, a simple node is a structure that holds two pointers. The first pointer refers to the data that is indirectly associated with the node, while the other refers to the next node in the sequence. Simple nodes are typically used in forward lists (singly-linked lists) where we keep track of the head node only. The last node in the list refers to NULL as there can be no next node after the last node. We can insert new data into the list knowing only the address of the data. A new node is constructed which then refers to the data and to the current head of the list. The new node then becomes the head of the list. Insertions at the head are performed in constant time. Inserting anywhere else in the list requires that we traverse the nodes recursively, following each node's next pointer, starting from the head, stopping at the node that should come after the new node. That node then becomes the new node's next node (if the node reaches the end of the list, the next node is NULL). Since we traversed recursively, we can return the newly inserted node to the caller, which can then be assigned to the caller's next node. All other recursions simply return the node we traversed to, thus leaving the caller's next node unchanged. The following example shows a simple node implementation for an ordered list of type int: typedef struct Node_t { // a simple node int* data; Node_t* next; } Node; Node* insert (int* data, Node* node) { // insert data if (!node *node->data > *data ) { // insertion point reached (end recursions) Node* pnode = malloc (sizeof (Node)); // create a new node pnode->data = data; // attach the data pnode->next = node; // refer to the next node (may be NULL) return pnode; // return the new node so the previous node can be updated } // if we get this far, the given node comes before the new data // delegate to the next node, the return value is the new or existing next node node->next = insert (data, node->next); return node; // return the node (it remains the previous node's next node) } void print_all (Node* node) { // print the given node and all that follow it while (node) { printf ("%d ", *node->data); node = node->next; } } Node* destroy_all (Node* node) // destroy the given node and all that follow it while (node) { Node* next = node->next; // refer to the next node (may be NULL) free (node->data); // release the current node's data free (node); // release the node itself node = next; // make the next node current (may be NULL) } return node; // always NULL } int main(void) { // The test program... srand ((unsigned) time (NULL)); // seed a random number generator Node* head = NULL; // the head node of the list (initially NULL for an empty list) for (int i=0; i<10; ++i) { // insert 10 random integers int* pint = malloc (sizeof (int)); // allocate a new integer on the free store if (!pint) break; // allocation failed, stop inserting! *pint = rand () % 10; // assign a random integer value (range 0:9) head = insert (pint, head); // insert the data (the return value is the new or existing head) } print_all (head); // print all the nodes starting from the head node head = delete_all (head); // destroy all the nodes starting from the head (returns NULL) return 0; }


Use a while loop to traverse at the end of the list and use the condition as pointer not equal to null. Something like: function getLastNode(LinkedList *list) { if(list == null) return null; while(list->next != null) { list = list->next; } // list now points to the last node return list; }


A node on any plant is where the leaf bud grows from the stem.



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