Nouns

Is whose a noun clause?

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2012-03-05 18:39:09
2012-03-05 18:39:09

No, whose is a pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun. The word whose is an interrogative pronoun that asks a question, and a relative pronoun that introduces a relative clause. For example:

Interrogative: Whose car is parked next to the hydrant?

Relative (and possessive): The blue car, whose windshield has the ticket, is your car!

Whose introduces the relative clause 'whose windshield has the ticket'.

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A clause that modifies a noun or a pronoun is a relative clause; a clause introduced by a relative pronoun; a clause that 'relates' to a noun or pronoun in the sentence.The relative pronouns are: who, whom, whose, which, that.Examples:The man who fixed the dishwasher was recommended by my sister. the clause 'who fixed the dishwasher' relates to the noun 'man'The people to whom we sent invitations are all current customers. the clause 'to whom we sent invitations' relates to the noun 'people'The person whose mailbox I hit was very nice about it. the clause 'whose mailbox I hit' relates to the noun 'person'Discussing which movie to see, we decided on the animated penguins. the clause 'which movie to see' relates to the gerund 'discussing'The one that I got said that I had thirty days to respond. the clause 'that I got' relates to the indefinite pronoun 'one'


The words that introduce a noun clause are the relative pronouns; they are: who, whom, whose, which, that.Example: The person to whom you give the application is the manager.


A clause is a group of words that contains both a subject and a verb but cannot always be considered a full, grammatical sentence.An adjective clause, also called a relative clause, modifies the noun or pronoun preceding it. The noun or pronoun that it modifies is called the antecedent. The clause will start with a relative pronoun (who, whom, which, that, where, whose, whoever).Examples:The man who lives next door has a nice garden. (the relative clause describes the noun 'man')I come from a town that is about two hours west of Boston. (the relative clause describes the noun 'town')The one whose car is blocking the driveway better move it. (the relative clause describes the indefinite pronoun 'one')


A noun clause is a group of words that contains a noun or pronoun and a verb but is an incomplete thought that can't stand on it's own. A noun clause can perform the function of a noun as the subject of a sentence and the object of a verb or a preposition. Examples:noun clause as subject: The man whose mailbox I hit was very nice about it.noun clause as object: My car is the one parked next to the fire hydrant.noun clause as subject and object: What you wantis the best quality that you can afford.


A noun clause usually begins with a relative pronoun like "that," "which," "who," "whoever," "whomever," "whose," "what," and "whatsoever."The noun clause is -- that people will truly love one another -- it has the subject people, the verb phrase will truly


What is a noun clause?


No, "as you" is not a noun clause. As is serving as a conjunction and you is a pronoun.


There are two clauses in the example sentence:whose real name was Julius Marxwho were all comediansBoth of these clauses are relative clauses. A relative clause is a group of words that includes a subject and a verb but is not a complete sentence. A relative clause 'relates' information about a noun or an antecedent.The word 'whose' is functioning as an adjective by describing the noun 'name'. The clause relates information about the noun 'Groucho Marx".The word 'who' is functioning as a relative pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun by introducing the relative clause that relates information about its antecedent 'brothers'.


No, the word 'whose' is not a noun.The word 'whose' is a pronoun, the possessive form of the pronoun 'who'.The pronoun 'whose' takes the place of a noun for a person as an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun.An interrogative pronoun introduces a question. Examples:Who is the new math teacher? (the pronoun 'who' takes the place of the noun that answers the question)Whose math book can I borrow? (the pronoun 'whose' takes the place of the possessive noun, the answer to the question and the owner of the book)A relative pronoun introduces a relative clause. A relative clause is a group of words that gives information about the antecedent, it has a subject and a verb but isn't a complete sentence. Examples:Mr. Smith is the person who teach math now. (the relative clause gives more information about the antecedent 'person')Janet whose math book I borrowed was so kind. (The relative clause gives more information about the antecedent 'Janet')Possessive noun example:Whose book did I borrow? I borrowed Janet's book.


No, whose is a pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun. The word whose is an interrogative pronoun that asks a question, and a relative pronoun that introduces a relative clause. For example: Interrogative: Whose car is parked next to the hydrant? Relative (and possessive): The blue car, whose windshield has the ticket, is your car!


A noun clause is a group of words containing a subject and its verb but is not a complete sentence. A noun clause takes the place of a noun and cannot stand on its own.The noun clause is whatever is served.The noun clause is the direct object of the verb 'will eat'.


The noun clause is a prepositional clause.The noun clause 'whomever did the best job' is functioning as the object of the preposition 'to'.


The relative clause is 'whose hands were colder than the rest' which 'relates' information about its antecedent 'man'. The relative pronoun 'whose' is functioning as an adjective to describe the noun 'hands'.


a dependent clause that modifies a noun


The 'introductory' pronoun is 'who', which introduces the relative clause 'who died for you'.Relative pronouns are used to introduce relative clauses; they are: who, whom, whose, which, that.


a clause that modify or identify a noun or a noun phrase is called NC in apposition


"My great dream is" is a noun clause; it is a group of words based on a noun (dream) containing a verb (is), but is an incomplete thought. That is the definition of a noun clause.


A noun clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb but is an incomplete thought that can't stand on it's own. A noun clause can perform the function of a noun as the subject of a sentence and the object of a verb or a preposition. A clause is like a sentence that's within a sentence. A noun clause has the function of a noun in the main sentence. For example: "I like Jane." "I" is the subject (a noun), "like" is the predicate (a verb), and "Jane" is the object (a noun). We can substitute for the word "Jane" (which is a noun) a noun clause, such as "that she is so intelligent." "I like that she is intelligent." The entire clause "that she is intelligent" serves the same function as the noun "Jane" did in the original sentence. Thus, it's a noun clause.


The noun clause is, 'What took place in the courtroom'. The noun clause is acting as the subject of the sentence.


Yes, a dependent clause is a noun clause. The definition of a clause is a group of words containing a subject noun or pronoun and its verb. Example sentence:John went swimming but Jane didn't.


a clause introduced by a relative pronoun; "`who visits frequently' is a relative clause in the sentence `John, who visits frequently, is ill'" A relative clause is a subordinate clause that modifies a noun. For example, the noun phrase the man who wasn't there contains the noun man, which is modified by the relative clause who wasn't there a clause which qualifies or restricts the meaning of the noun in a noun phrase. It may be introduced by words such as who, which and that in


The clause following a preposition is a prepositional clause, or a noun clause.The object of a preposition can be a single word, a noun phrase, or a noun clause. A clause includes a noun or pronoun and a verb; a noun phrase is a noun or a pronoun, or a group of words that includes a noun or pronoun.Prepositional noun clause: Give the message to the man working on the roof.Prepositional phrase: I gave the message to the man on the roof.Prepositional phrase: I gave the message to a man. I gave the message to him.


A clause used as the object of a preposition is called a noun clause. A noun clause takes the role of a noun. In the sentence, "I do not know anything except what I saw last night. " The preposition is "except" and its object is the noun clause "what I saw last night".


The noun clause is 'Did you see the Russian soldiers...'; the noun clause is functioning as the subject of the sentence.


A noun clause can function as relating to a subject or an object in a sentence.Examples:The flowers that mother likes are the tulips. (the noun clause 'that mother likes' relates to the subject noun 'flowers')These are the flowers that mother likes. (the noun clause 'that mother likes' relates to the direct object noun 'flowers')



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