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Answered 2009-06-10 05:35:41

ratio of protons to neutrons.

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What ratio can be used to predict the stability of an atom?

This is the protons/neutrons ratio in the atomic nucleus.


The stability of an isotope nucleus depends on?

neutron to proton ratio :)


The stability of an isotope nucleus depends on what?

Neutron/Proton Ratio


The stability of an isotope nucleus depends on the?

neutron to proton ratio


What are the nuclear transformations to be exercised by a nuclide to attain stability?

AnswerNuclear transformation is what happens to an unstable atom nucleus when exercising changes to attain stability. The stability of a nucleus depends on the ratio of neutrons to protons in this nucleus and on the absolute number of protons that should not exceed certain limit. For a nucleus with neutron/proton ratio higherthan the corresponding stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:neutron transformation to proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiationemitting neutron from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87For a nucleus with neutron/proton ratio lower than the corresponding stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:proton transformation to neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiationproton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus.For an unstable nucleus with with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, it may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations and/or by:fission (or splitting) of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei (called fragments) with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of some heavy nuclei).


How can atom attain stability?

Nuclear transformation is what happens to an unstable atom nucleus when exercising changes to attain stability. The stability of a nuclide depends on the ratio of neutrons to protons in this nucleus and on the absolute number of protons that should not exceed certain limit.For a nucleus with neutron/proton ratio higherthan the corresponding stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability: * neutron transformation to proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiation * emitting neutron from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87 For a nucleus with neutron/proton ratio lowerthan the corresponding stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability: * proton transformation to neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiation * proton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus. For an unstable nucleus with with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, it may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations or by: * fission (or splitting) of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei (called fragments) with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of some heavy nuclei ).


What are examples of nuclear transformations?

Nuclear transformation is what happens to unstable atom nuclei in while striving to reach stability. The nucleus of any element atom should have specific neutron/proton ratio to be a stable nucleus. In addition, the absolute number of protons should not exceed certain limit.For a nucleus with neutron/proton is higher than the stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:neutron transformation to proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiationemitting neutron from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87)For a nucleus with neutron/proton is lower than the stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:proton transformation to neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiationproton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus.For an unstable nucleus with with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, it may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations or by:fission of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of one of the plutonium isotopes).The above are five examples of nuclear transformation.Nuclear transformation is what happens to unstable atom nuclei in its efforts striving to reach stability. The nucleus of any element atom should have specific neutron/proton ratio to be stable nucleus. Also, the absolute number of protons should not exceed certain limit.For a nucleus with neutron/proton is higher than the stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:neutron transformation to proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiationemitting neutron from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87)For a nucleus with neutron/proton is lower than the stability ratio, two nuclear transformations may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:proton transformation to neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiationproton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus.For an unstable nucleus with with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, it may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations or by:fission of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of one of the plutonium isotopes).The above are five examples of nuclear transformation.


How is nuclear fission different from radioactive decay?

Radioactive decay happens to the unstable atom nuclei in its efforts striving to reach stability. The nucleus of any element atom should have specific neutron/proton ratio to be a stable nucleus. Also, the absolute number of protons should not exceed certain limit.For a nucleus with neutron/proton different than the stability ratio, radioactive decay occurs to reach the stability ratio. For a nucleus with the absolute number of protons exceeding a certain limit, the nucleus may reach stability by radioactive decay and/or fission of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of one of the plutonium isotopes) and gamma electromagnetic radiation.For more details:For a nucleus with neutron/proton is higher than the stability ratio, two types of radioactive decay may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:radioactive beta decay: in which a neutron transforms into proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiationradioactive neutron decay: in which a neutron is emitted from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87)For a nucleus with neutron/proton is lower than the stability ratio, two types of radioactive decay may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:radioactive proton decay: in which a proton in the nucleus transforms into neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiationproton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus.For an unstable nucleus with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, the nucleus may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations or by:fission of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of one of the plutonium isotopes).


What does the stability of a nucleus depend on?

The stability of a nucleus depends on the ratio of protons to neutrons. It's not a simple ratio that's the same for all atomic numbers, it varies. For small atomic numbers, 1:1 is about right. For higher atomic numbers, more neutrons are needed.


Carbon 14 is radioactive because?

Stability of a nucleus is dictated by the neutron/proton ratio. Too large or too small and the nucleus is unstable.


Where does radioactive decay take place?

Radioactive decay happens to the unstable atom nuclei in its efforts striving to reach stability. The nucleus of any element atom should have specific neutron/proton ratio to be a stable nucleus. Also, the absolute number of protons should not exceed certain limit.For a nucleus with neutron/proton is higher than the stability ratio, two types of radioactive decay may occur to decrease the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:radioactive beta decay: in which a neutron transforms into proton plus electron where the proton remains in the nucleus and the electron is emitted from the nucleus as beta radiationradioactive neutron decay: in which a neutron is emitted from the nucleus as neutron radiation (this transformation is relatively rare. Example of this transformation is the unstable Krypton-87)For a nucleus with neutron/proton is lower than the stability ratio, two types of radioactive decay may occur to increase the ratio in the nucleus in order to reach stability:radioactive proton decay: in which a proton in the nucleus transforms into neutron plus positron where the neutron remains in the nucleus and the positron is emitted from the nucleus as positive beta radiationproton attraction of one electron from the nearest orbit to the nucleus to form neutron that remains in the nucleus.For an unstable nucleus with number of protons exceeding the stability limit, the nucleus may reach stability with one or more of the above four nuclear transformations or by:fission of the nucleus into two or more smaller nuclei with emission of one or more neutrons (as the spontaneous fission of one of the plutonium isotopes).


What determines the stability of a nucleaus?

A nucleus is stable if the ratio of neutrons to protons is from 1 to 1.5, meaning there will be equal or more neutrons. Google the "band of stability" for a picture of the ratios.


What is the ratio of neutrons to protons in a stable atomic nucleus?

The ratio of neutrons to protons in stable atomic nuclei ranges from about 1 to 1 at the lower end of the scale of atomic numbers to about 1.6 to 1 at the upper end. This band of stabilitymight also be called the stability belt, stability band, or stability zone, depending on the text being consulted. In general, any ratio that falls outside the band will represent an unstable nucleus, and that atom will be a radionuclide, and be radioactive, and will decay in time. Links can be found below.


The stability of a nuclide depends on the?

The stability of a nuclide depends on:the specific neutron/proton ratio that corresponds to a stable nucleus, and orthe number of protons not to exceed the stability limit (exceeding 83).Referring to question below for more information.


Why does an excited atom radiate?

An exited atom radiate through the process to gain stability. When the ratio or protons to neutrons is less or higher than that corresponding to the stability ratio the nucleus radiate either:beta (-) radiation to reduce the number of neutrons, orbeta (+) radiation or electron capture to reduce the number of protonsgamma radiation to bring the nucleus to ground state energy level.Also an excited atom emits radiation (Alpha, beta, gamma, neutrons, ...) when the nucleus atomic number is higher than 83 to reduce the number of nucleons in thenucleus to reach stability.


Why the stability decrease with increasing atomic mass?

Stability depends on to proton/neutron ratio; and this ratio increase with the atomic number.


What is the purpose of neutrons of an atom?

The neutron in the nucleus of the atom is serving two main functions:First neutrons; being of neutral electric charge; help in maintaining the protons; of positive electric charge; held together in the nucleusSecond for radioactive elements due to the ratio of protons to neutrons is less than stability ratio, the neutron transforms into a proton (pf positive electric charge) and an electron (pf negative charge) that is emitted out of the nucleus as negative beta decay. Hence the nucleus approaches stability line.


Why are some isotopes more stable than others?

The stability of the isotopes depends on the ratio neutrons/protons in the atomic nucleus, the mass number and the atomic mass.


What is the stability of a nucleus most affected by?

1- n/p ratio where n is number of neutron and p number of proton 2-shell model 3-binding energy


What aspects of the composition of a nucleus can cause it to be unstable?

The two aspects that cause the nucleus of any element atom to be unstable are:not have the specific neutron/proton ratio to be a stable nucleus, and orhaving number of protons that exceeds the stability limit (exceeding 83).Referring to question below for more information.


The stability of a nucleus depends on the?

Ratio of protons to neutrons. And it's not a simple ratio that's the same for all atomic numbers, it varies. For small atomic numbers, 1:1 is about right. For higher atomic numbers, more neutrons are needed.


The stability of atomic nuclei seems to be related to the ratio of what?

The stability of atomic nuclei seems to be related to the ratio of neutrons to protons. This ratio increases with increasing atomic number due to increasing nuclear charge.


What triggers an unstable nucleus to decay?

When a nucleus is unstable it has either too many or too few neutrons in the nucleus. This is what causes nuclear decay as the nucleus needs to have the correct ratio of neutrons to protons to be stable. It may be triggered by an outside force, such as a colliding particle, or simply by chance.


What is the band of stability?

The band of stability is a way of viewing which isotopes of the elements are stable. If you make a graph of number of neutrons versus number of protons of the stable isotopes, you find that the stable isotopes make a thick curved line on the graph which is called the "band of stability." The lighter elements tend to have the number of neutrons equal to number of protons. The heavier elements tend to have more neutrons than protons. The band of stability can help you to predict the behavior of unstable radioactive isotopes as well, because you can predict which decay process will move the element closer to the "band of stability" so it will have the ideal ratio of neutrons to protons.


Why does the nucleus of an atom contain protons and electrons?

The nucleus of an atom doesn't contain electrons. The nucleus contain protons and neutrons. The protons are of positive charge. The neutrons are of neutral charge (zero electric charge). The neutrons help in getting the nucleus more stable during the radioactive decay due to excess of neutrons than the stability proton to neutron ratio, a neutron transforms into a proton plus an electron. Hence, the electron is radiated as a negative beta radiation and the neutron to proton ratio gets closer to the stability line. The protons in an atom are equal to the atom electrons to keep the atom of neutral charge.


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