Golden Gate Bridge

What body of water does the Golden Gate Bridge span?

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2011-01-01 19:30:58
2011-01-01 19:30:58

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden_Gate, the opening of the San_Francisco_Bayinto the Pacific Ocean.

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