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2011-02-05 17:43:28
2011-02-05 17:43:28

Heat causes Mercury in the thermometer to expand, where as when it is cooled, it contracts.

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the liquid in the thermometer rises because of the surrounding heat which causes a chemical reaction wihtin the substance which makes the liquid rises. When, the liquid sinks, itn is because the air has gotten cooler


The doctor dips the thermometer into a liquid metal named mercury to make the temparature of the thermometer fall down.


The cold reduces the temperature in the liquid inside the thermometer bulb. Most substances contract when their temperature drops so the liquid in the bulb occupies less space. this causes the column of liquid outside the bulb to become smaller.


As the liquid in the thermometer is heated it expands, and the only way the expanding liquid can go is upward. As the liquid in the thermometer cools, it will contract, and the liquid will fall back down into the resevoir, causing the column of liquid to move downward.


The thermometer works by measuring the temperature of the air or liquid around it. The substance being tested will heat or cool down the liquid in the thermometer to the temperature that it is.


The thermometer is more dense than a liquid.


Thermometric liquid is the liquid found in the thermometer that help in the up and down movement of the temperature.


Place the thermometer in the liquid you are measuring. Wait until the temperature stabilizes, and then read the thermometer at eye level, just like you would a graduated cylinder, except that there's no meniscus. If you are measuring a liquid that is being heated over a Bunsen burner, you should have the thermometer held in place with a thermometer clamp. You should have the thermometer positioned about halfway down in the liquid.


When the liquid in the thermometer gets warmer it expands. This means its volume increases. The only place for the extra volume to go is up the tube, so the level of liquid rises. When the liquid gets colder it contracts (reduces in volume) so it moves back down the tube. See http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/how_it_works/thermometer.html


This liquid is sometimes colored alcohol but can also be a metallic liquid called mercury. Both mercury and alcohol grow bigger (expand) when heated and smaller (contract) when cooled. Inside the glass tube of a thermometer, the liquid has no place to go but up when the temperature is hot and down when the temperature is cold. Its the process of expansion and contraction


the heat and temperature that causes it to rise and fall.


Not quite; This is what the first source said about how a thermometer works; This liquid is sometimes colored alcohol but can also be a metallic liquid called mercury. Both mercury and alcohol grow bigger when heated and smaller when cooled. Inside the glass tube of a thermometer, the liquid has no place to go but up when the temperature is hot and down when the temperature is cold. In other words, the thermometer goes up or down due to the expansion of the alcohol or mercury due to the heat. After reviewing the second source, you will see that the columns go up and down due to the atmospheric pressure. If it goes up and down due to atmospheric pressure it is a manometer. A manometer does not work if it is not exposed to the atmosphere. A thermometer is sealed off to the outside. This is another reason why a thermometer is different from a manometer.


Mercury is more heat reactive so it was more precise and the liquid went up and down more.


Typical Liquid in Glass Thermometers (air and body temperature)Molecules moving around the thermometer impart energy to the liquid inside, increasing its own energy, or heat. The heat causes the expansion of the liquid, which rises up the tube.The molecules in contact with the thermometer can also absorb energy from the molecules of the liquid, which will cause the liquid to contract, and move down in the tube. (The glass tube has little friction, and the liquid is highly cohesive, so it will "pool" in the reservoir at the bottom when it cools.) The balance between energy absorbed and energy imparted will be achieved when the thermometer liquid is at the same temperature as the measured material, as indicated on the marked graduated tube.Metal Coil Thermometers (thermostats)As with liquid thermometers, the metal winding expands or contracts in response to the energy absorbed from the air or liquid around it. This expansion pushes the end of the metal indicator back and forth in the dial face.


Ethanol-filled thermometers are used in preference to mercury for meteorological measurements of minimum temperatures and can be used down to −70 °C (-94 °F). The physical limitation of the ability of a thermometer to measure low temperature is the freezing point of the liquid used.Alcohol


OK basically depending on what thermometer. the glass tube is filled with either alcohol or Mercury. and when it gets hotter, the liquid expands and takes up more space inside the tube. and colder.......the liquid compacts and moves down the tube.....and it's taken years to calabrate the markings on the tube to show the correct reading.


To turn food into a liquid paste for an easy travel down the intestine.


An air thermometer has a bubble of liquid inside the tube and when the air inside of the tube heats up or cools down, the air takes up either more or less space inside of the tube, causing the bubble of liquid to either move upwards or downwards, indicating the temperature.


It does not by itself. It must be shaken down. The liquid is mercury, which is very heat-expansive, i.e. it changes its volume noticeably and quickly depending on its temperature. The warmer, the larger the volume. That's why it's used in thermometers. However, thermometers are built so that the mercury does not go down by itself to enable taking precise readings (otherwise, it would fall quickly immediately after the thermometer is removed from the body). So, the thermometer must cool and the contracted but vacuum-stuck mercury must then be shaken down to take another measurement.


The bulb thermometer--the common glass type--is filled with a fluid such as mercury. The liquid changes its volume relative to its temperature, moving up and down the tube as it heats up or cools down. The mercury takes up less space when it is cold and more when it is hot. An outdoor thermometer measures the temperatures of the surrounding air and is usually affixed to the sides of houses or decks to give an exact reading of the temperature in the immediate area. The bulb of the thermometer--the common glass type--is filled with a fluid such as mercury. The liquid changes its volume relative to its temperature, moving up and down the tube as it heats up or cools down. The mercury takes up less space when it is cold and more when it is hot.


Digital thremometer is shows digit and run by electric or cells mercury thermometer is shows mercury up and down. when temperature low and down.


It's because some of the harsh liquid trickles down your windpipe and causes a 'laryngospasm'.


No. Food and liquids should not go down into the lungs. That is why one coughs excessively when food or liquid "goes down the wrong tube." Aspiration is the term for breathing food or liquid into the lungs, and frequently causes a severe pneumonitis and may result in pneumonia.


In general, a low pitch is created by sound waves vibrating and having to travel down a lengthy object, while a high pitch only has to travel down a shorter distance


The Earth's core is liquid because of the great heat down there, which is generated by the immense pressure of all the Earth's other layers which press in on it.



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