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What do you get when you divide true power in a circuit by the pararent power?


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Answered 2010-10-31 00:15:06

Power factor is truepower divide by apparent power.

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ratio between true power and apparent power is called the power factor for a circuit Power factor =true power/apparent power also we conclude PF=power dissipated / actual power in pure resistive circuit if total resistance is made zero power factor will be zero


these two types of circuit loads are the purely capacitive loads and purely inductive loadsAnother AnswerApparent power will be larger than true, or active, power in ANY circuit, other than a purely-resistive circuit or an R-L-C circuit at resonance.


The resistor is the only component to develop true power in an ac circuit. The inductor and capacitors absorb energy on one half cycle and return it to the supply on the next. The resistive part of the inductor (wire coil if low frequency type) will develop true power due to its value of resistance ie it will get warm.


Single phase PF = Input Watts/Volts x Amps. Three phase PF =Input Watts/Volts x Amps x1.732.Additional AnswerYou can determine the power factor of a circuit using three instruments: a voltmeter, and ammeter, and a wattmeter.Multiplying the voltmeter reading by the ammeter reading will supply the value of the apparent power in volt amperes. The wattmeter reading will supply the value of the true power in watts.Divide the number of watts by the number of volt amperes, and that will indicate the power factor of the circuit.


'Reactive Power', which is expressed in reactive volt amperes, describes the rate at which energy is alternately stored (in a circuit's electric or magnetic field) and returned to the a.c. supply when the field collapses. It differs from true power, expressed in watts, because true power describes the rate at which energy is permanently lost by heat transfer due to the resistive component of the circuit.Reactive power doesn't 'have an use', per se, it's merely a way of quantifying the movement of energy in the reactive component of an a.c. circuit.The vector sum of a circuit's reactive power and its true power is called the apparent power of the circuit, expressed in volt amperes.


By definition, power factor is the cosine of the angle by which the load current lags or leads the supply voltage in an AC circuit. It is also the ratio of true power to apparent power. A lagging power factor occurs in an resistive-inductive circuit, where the load current lags the supply voltage. A leading power factor occurs in an resistive-capacitive circuit, where the load current leads the supply voltage


Power factor in any circuit is the ratio of the load's true power to its apparent power. It's also the cosine of the phase angle. In L-R circuits, it's described as a 'lagging power factor', because the load current lags the supply voltage.


to put out the power fector you have to divided apparent power with true power.AnswerYou can determine the true power of any load using a wattmeter. To find the apparent power, you use a voltmeter to measure the supply voltage and an ammeter to measure the load current, and multiply the two readings together.If you then want to go on to find the power factor, then you divide the true power by the apparent power. If you want to find the reactive power you use the following equation:(reactive power)2 = (true power)2 x (apparent power)2


In a DC circuit, the power in watts is the volts times the amps. In an AC circuit, the volts times the amps is called the VA, and the power in watts is the VA times the power factor, which is 1 for some appliances but less than 1 for others.>volt-amps, or current, is only one variable of any circuit; wattage would be the product of current times voltage, a.k.a. powerAnswerIn purely-resistive AC circuits, the load current and supply voltage are said to be in phase with each other, and the product of these two quantities is called the true power of the load, expressed in watts.If the AC circuit is not purely resistive, then it is described as being reactive, and the load current either lags or leads the supply voltage. In this case, the product of these two quantities results, not in the true power of the load, but in the apparent power of the load. To differentiate between apparent power and true power, apparent power is measured in volt amperes (V.A) while true power is measured in watts (W).The cosine of the angle by which the load current leads or lags the supply voltage in reactive loads is called power factor, and has to be taken into account when calculating the true power of the circuit -so, in this case, true power is the product of supply voltage, load current, and power factor.To summarise, volt amperes are used to measure the apparent power of a reactive load, while watts are used to measure its true power.


Inductors are considered to be a load for reactive power, meaning that they will draw reactive power from the system. Capacitors are considered to be sourced of reactive power, they feed reactive power into the system. If you have a circuit that is at unity (balanced with inductors and capacitors) no reactive power will be drawn from the source. You will have unity power factor. If your circuit is more inductive than capacitive it will be drawing reactive power from the source. The opposite is also true for capacitors.


With a DC, we only have to consider the resistance of the load when we calculate power. However, with AC, we must also consider reactance (inductive reactance and/or capacitive reactance) when we calculate power. In fact, we need to consider three 'types' of power: true power, reactive power, and apparent power:True power describes the rate at which energy is dissipated by the resistive component of the circuit. This energy cannot be restored. We measure true power in watts.Reactive power describes the rate at which energy is temporarily stored in the magnetic field (inductive component) or electric field (capacitive component), and returned to the source when the field collapses. We measure reactive power in reactive volt amperes.Apparent power is the net rate of transfer of energy, and is the vector sum of true and reactive power. We measure apparent power in volt amperes.To find the true power of the circuit, you can use a wattmeter. To measure the apparent power of the circuit, it is simply the product of the supply voltage and load current. You will need to vectorially subtract the true power from the apparent power to determine the reactive power.A very important ratio used in AC power calcuations is (true power)/(apparent power), and this is called power factor -it corresponds to the cosine of the angle (phi) by which the load current lags or leads the supply voltage.Simple vector analysis will reveal that the true power = U I cos (phi)


Use a voltmeter to measure the supply voltage and an ammeter to measure the load current, and use the product of these to determine the apparent power of the load in volt amperes. Use a wattmeter to find the true power of the load in watts. Divide the true power by the apparent power to give you the power factor.


Power factor is the ratio of true power versus apparent power. It is caused by the fact that current and voltage, in a reactive circuit (usually inductive, but also capacitive) are not in phase with each other.


Power factor is related to the phase angle between voltage and current. It is a measure of the difference between true and apparent power. In a purely resistive circuit, voltage and current will be in phase, and the power factor will be 1. In a circuit with capacitive or inductive reactance, current will lag voltage (inductive) or lead voltage (capacitive). In the worst case, power factor is zero with 90 degrees of lag or lead, and the apparent power will be zero, while the true power is not.


Its 'true power', expressed in watts, will be zero, while its 'reactive power', expressed in reactive volt amperes, will be the product of the voltage across the inductor and the current through it.


for the purely inductance power,the power factor is zero because true power equals zero.here the power triangle would look like a vertical,because the adjacent (true power) side would have zero length....Engr. olunloyo university of lagos ,Nigeria


Apparent power is the vectorial sum of the true power and reactive power. In this case, the total reactive power is the difference between 7200 var and 3600 var -i.e. 3600 var.So you can now use the equation,(apparent power)2 = (true power)2 + (total reactive power)2,to determine your answer.


Although we can't necessarily see electricity, we can measure it by its effects. An ampere, or amp, represents the amount of current in a circuit. Voltage is defined scientifically as the circuit's "potential difference," and can be seen as the amount of "pressure" that drives electricity in a circuit. Watts are a measure of the use of electrical power, and one watt is equal to one volt multiplied by one amp.Additional AnswerThe watt is used to measure an AC circuit's true power, whereas a volt ampere is used to measure the circuit's apparent power.Apparent power is the product of current and voltage, whereas true power is the product of current, voltage, and power factor.The true power of an AC circuit is measured using a wattmeter, whereas the apparent power is the product of current and voltage.


One horsepower electric is 746 watts. Divide that by 415 to get amps, giving about 1.8. Divide that further by 3 because it is three phase power, giving about 0.6. Divide that further by power factor to compensate for apparent versus true power caused by reactance, say about 0.8, giving about 0.75.


When the circuit is purely resistive or in resonance, i.e. capacitive and inductive reactance cancels out.Power factor is the ratio of apparent power over true power, and is the cosine of the phase angle between voltage and current.


A kVA is 1000 watts. Where k stands for kilo or 1000. V for volts A for amperes. A watt is a volt X a ampere. Mega means 1 000 000 so a megawatt= 1000 kVA. Note: This is only true for resistive loads like heaters and lightbulbs.AnswerYou cannot really ask 'How many watts equal how many volt amperes?', because you are describing two different quantities, as explained below:Alternating-current loads are often combinations of resistance and reactance (reactance is the opposition to current due to either inductance, or capacitance, or a combination of both).Loads having both resistance and reactance exhibit true power and reactive power.True power describes the rate at which energy is permanently lost due to the resulting temperature difference between the conductor(s) and the surroundings. True power is associated with purely resistive loads, and is expressed in watts.Reactive power describes the rate at which energy is alternately stored in a magnetic or electric field then returned to the supply. Reactive power is associated with purely reactive loads, and is expressed in reactive volt amperes.Apparent power is the vector sum of true power and reactive power, and is expressed in volt amperes.The relationship between true power and apparent power is:true power = apparent power x power factorPower factor varies from zero (purely reactive circuit) to unity (purely resistive circuit). So, true power (in watts) will only equal apparent power (in volt amperes) when the power factor is unity -i.e. in a purely resistive circuit. For all other types of circuit, the true power will always be less than the apparent power.


A kilowatt is an unit of true power in an AC circuit -as measured by a wattmeter. A kilovolt ampere is an unit of apparent power in an AC circuit, which is the product of the voltage across a load by the current through it. The relationship between the two is: kilowatt = (kilovolt ampere) x (power factor of load)


You do not 'develop' power factor; it is naturally-occurring in the sense that it is the ratio between the true power and the apparent power of a load in an a.c. system. It is numerically equal to the cosine of the phase angle -i.e. the angle by which the load current lags or leads the supply voltage.You can 'modify' the power factor of a circuit, for example, by adding capacitance to an inductive circuit, or the other way around.


Step 1The KVA equation is for the potential of the electrical circuit. This means the electrical circuit can provide this much power to the motor or device. The KW equation will give the actual power used by the device or motor since the power factor of the motor is multiplied into the formula. The power factor is generally listed on the identification nameplate of most larger electrical motors that use a 3-phase power.Step 2Calculate the KVA of an electrical circuit that has the potential of 480 volts at 50 amperes. Multiply 1.73 times 480 times 50 will equal 41,520 VA. Note that the answer is in VA (volt amperes) and not KVA. We must divide 1000 by the final answer in order to change the VA into KVA. To find KVA from 41,520 VA divide this number by 1000, this will equal 41.52 KVA.Step 3Find the KW rating or consumption of the 3-phase circuit if the power factor of the device is 1.15 as identified on the nameplate. Use the formula, (KW = KVA * power factor) to find the result. KW is equal to 41.52 KVA times 1.15, which results in 47.748 KW.Step 4Find the KW consumption of the following 3-phase motor circuit that has a voltage of 230 VAC, a current draw of 75 amperes and a power factor rating of .95. Using the formula (KW = 1.73 * volts * amperes * power factor/1000) we can plug in the numbers so the equation looks like, KW = 1.73 * 230 * 75 * .95/1000. This will equal 28.350 KW.Alternative AnswerA volt ampere is the unit of measurement for apparent power, which is the vector sum of a load's true power(watts) and reactive power (reactive volt amperes).So, if you know the load's true power, then you need to know either its reactive power or its power factor in order to determine its apparent power, as follows:either: (apparent power)2 = (true power)2 + (reactive power)2or: apparent power = true power x power factor


The current's power factor is the true power divided by the apparent power. The Apparent Power is the volts multiplied by the amps. In this example, the ratio would be 200/253, or approximately .79.



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