What does Venice mean?

Venice is a city on the east coast of Italy, near the northern and eastern borders of the country. It is built in a bay or lagoon of the Adriatic sea, on a number of small islands or islets, many of which are the size of a city block. Transport between these small islands is done by boat, traditionally in boats called gondolas which are poled from place to place by gondoliers. Venice was founded in the 800s by refugees who picked a place for their city which could not be attacked from the landward side.

Almost from its beginning, Venice was an independent republic, having an elected leader or Doge. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it grew to acquire a great empire, not only in the adjacent territory in Italy (called Veneto) but also in the Balkans and the Greek islands. Venice was a main player in the Fourth Crusade, and in the Battle of Lepanto (1570) which curbed the aggression of the Ottoman Empire. The Republic of Venice declined and was eventually disbanded by Napoleon Bonaparte.

Venice nowadays suffers from turbulence in the lagoon caused by motorized boats, and a raising of water levels which submerges the lower parts of some buildings. The city as a whole is subject to flooding. It is nevertheless a tourist destination, because of its unusual nature and beautiful buildings, especially those around the Piazza San Marco (St. Mark's Square).
Venice is a city on the east coast of Italy, near the northern and eastern borders of the country. It is built in a bay or lagoon of the Adriatic sea, on a number of small islands or islets, many of which are the size of a city block. Transport between these small islands is done by boat, traditionally in boats called gondolas which are poled from place to place by gondoliers. Venice was founded in the 800s by refugees who picked a place for their city which could not be attacked from the landward side.

Almost from its beginning, Venice was an independent republic, having an elected leader or Doge. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it grew to acquire a great empire, not only in the adjacent territory in Italy (called Veneto) but also in the Balkans and the Greek islands. Venice was a main player in the Fourth Crusade, and in the Battle of Lepanto (1570) which curbed the aggression of the Ottoman Empire. The Republic of Venice declined and was eventually disbanded by Napoleon Bonaparte.

Venice nowadays suffers from turbulence in the lagoon caused by motorized boats, and a raising of water levels which submerges the lower parts of some buildings. The city as a whole is subject to flooding. It is nevertheless a tourist destination, because of its unusual nature and beautiful buildings, especially those around the Piazza San Marco (St. Mark's Square).