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What happens if an object of higher density is placed in water?

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2010-09-17 02:56:23
2010-09-17 02:56:23

Higher than what ?? If the object's density is higher than the density of water,

then the object sinks in the water.

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The general rule is that an object will float, if it has less density that the liquid (or gas) in which it is placed. If the density of a liquid is greater, a larger amount of objects will float. Also, the same object will float higher, if it is placed in a denser liquid.



The lower an objects density the less likely it is to sink in water. Objects with a higher density than water will sink if placed in it while objects with a lower density than water will float if placed in it.


Salt water has a higher density. The general rule is that an object will float if it has less density than the liquid in which it is placed.


Its density is bigger than the water density.


An object will float if it has less density than the fluid it is placed in. Floating is the result of the fact that there is a higher pressure at the bottom of the floating object, than at the top.


An object will float if it has less density than the fluid in which it is placed; if the object has more density, it will sink.



If the density of the object is less than the density of the water it is placed in, the object will float and vice versa.


If an object placed in water sinks - then it has a density greater than water.


If the object has less density than the liquid in which it will be placed, then it will float. If the object has a greater density than the liquid, then it will sink.


An object with lower density than the liquid will float, one with more density will sink. Anything with the same density will stay at the depth where it is placed. If it is placed half submerged it would sink until submerged.


Well it depends on the density of the object and the density of the liquid that it is placed in. The object produces a buoyant force that lifts it to the surface of the liquid.


An object with greater density than the liquid it is placed will tend to sink


When its density is less than the fluid in which it is placed


It isn't clear what units you are using, what liquid you are placing it in, and whether that is the density of the object or of the liquid. The general rule is that an object will float if it has less density than the liquid in which it is placed.


An object will sink if its density is greater than the liquid in which it is placed; it will float if its density is less.



Answer: More than 1.0 Answer: More than the density of the liquid in which the object is placed. For example, water has a density of about 1000 kg/m3; any object with a greater density than this will sink if placed in water. If you place something in oil, the numbers are different.


yes, if its density is greater than the fluid it is immersed in, it sinks


The liquid rises higher when a object is placed inside of it is because the mass of the object takes up space inside the liquid, which pushes the liquid in a direction that has space available.


Buoyancy is the force a fluid exerts on object. If the density of an object is greater than that of the fluid in which it is placed, it will sink unless it's shape gives it an average density that is less than the fluid, like a boat.


If the density of an object is less than that of water it will float. If it had a higher density it would sink. Since water has a specific gravity very close to 1 (it is exactly 1.000 at 4 °C but slightly less at other temperatures) an object with a specific gravity of 1 would sink. The mass of the water it would displace would be less than the mass of the object so the buoyancy forces would not be sufficient to let it float.





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