answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2012-11-28 19:39:21
2012-11-28 19:39:21

The life insurance benefit will be paid to the deceased's estate.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


When no beneficiary has been designated the proceeds of a life Insurance policy are assigned to the probate estate of the deceased insured. It would then be apportioned by the probate court to any surviving heirs.




An insurance policy and a will are two separate things. The policy is a contract between the insured and the insurance company. The beneficiary of the insurance policy is spelled out in the contract. The insurance company will pay the insurance proceeds to whoever is listed to receive the proceeds. The proceeds from an insuranc policy can be paid into the estate of the deceased and disbursed according to the terms of the will. The issue is who is listed as being the beneficiary of the insurance policy.


Yes, you can have a secondary beneficiary on your life insurance policy. If the primary beneficiary is no longer living when you pass away, the secondary beneficiary would receive the proceeds from your life insurance policy.


If no beneficiary is listed on an insurance policy the proceeds will be paid to the decedent/owner's estate.


Generally, if the beneficiary is deceased, the proceeds go to the contingent beneficiary, or if none, to the estate of the insured. An attorney must be consulted to direct you on how to handle this in your state. It depends on whether the beneficiary predeceased the insured. If the beneficiary died before the insured then the proceeds go the the contingent beneficiary. If there is not a contingent, check the contract, it probably is paid to the Owner of the Estate of the Insured. If the Beneficiary died after the Insured, the proceeds go to the Beneficiary's Estate. It is important to have a contingent beneficiary specified in your life insurance policy. This way, if the beneficiary passes away, the contingent beneficiary will benefit. If there is no contingent beneficiary, and the beneficiary has deceased, the proceeds of the life insurance policy, go to the estate and is distributed according to the Will.


If the insured has died the proceeds from the insurance will be paid AS STATED IN THE POLICY. The proceeds of the claim are not part of the assets of the deceased's estate.


You are entitled to no proceeds from the life policy if the beneficiary or contingent beneficiary is still alive.


Yes, if the owner of the policy does not file a change of beneficiary the insurance will have to pay the proceeds to the person who is named on the policy.


The proceeds of the insurance policy are not effected as long as there is a named beneficiary. If the estate is the beneficiary than the proceeds are subject to probate and taxation.


The policy proceeds will become part of the decedent's estate.


If the insurance policy owner did not specify a beneficiary or the beneficiary is deceased, then the life insurance proceeds go to the insured's estate.


No. Life insurance is paid the the beneficiary named in the policy, your creditors have no claim against the insurance proceeds EXCEPT if the proceeds are paid to your estate.


Usually, life insurance proceeds are free from federal taxes. If the beneficiary is an individual person/persons, the proceeds of a life isnurance policy are tax-free. If the beneficiary of a life insurance policy is the "Estate" of the insured person, the proceeds may be subject to estate taxes.


A person listed as a beneficiary is the receiver of any proceeds from an insurance policy. They are normally named in the policy document or can be named in a will.


A will cannot insert a name or change the name of a beneficiary of a will. However, you can have an insurance policy made payable to the estate, then give the proceeds of the policy to a named beneficiary. Problem here is that the policy proceeds run through the estate and become subject to debts and administration expenses and perhaps taxes, whereas they would not be if a beneficiary were named in the policy.


If the husband was the named beneficiary of the policy, if the policy was in force at the time of death, and if the cause of death was not excluded by the policy, the general answer is "Yes". If the beneficiary was the estate of the wife, the proceeds are paid to the estate. Then, if the husband was a beneficiary of the estate (either by virtue of a Will naming him as beneficiary, or if no Will, through the laws of intestate succession), he may be entitled to all or a part of the insurance proceeds. If the beneficiary of the life insurance policy was someone other than the husband as of the time of the wife's death, proceeds are payable to that person.


A Contingent or Secondary Beneficiary will receive the proceeds from a life insurance policy after the Insured's deaths, if the Primary Beneficiary does not survive the Insured Person. This means, if the primary beneficiary is not alive at the time of death of the insured person, then the contingent beneficiary will receive the proceeds from the life insurance policy. Examples of situations which may give rise to the contingent beneficiary receiving the proceeds from a life insurance policy. 1. The insured and primary beneficiary die in an accident together, for example, a car accident. 2. The primary beneciairy dies, and the insured forgets to update the beneficiaries for his/her life insurance policy.


The beneficiary of a life insurance policy is not responsible for paying for the deceased's funeral cost using the money from the proceeds of the life insurance policy. The estate of the deceased is responsible for paying for the funeral cost from the proceeds of the estate.


If no one is named as beneficiary on a policy than the death proceeds would go to the insureds estate and would be subject to taxation and probate. A very costly mistake!


No, the beneficiary of a life insurance cannot be changed by the executor unless he's the owner of the policy. The proceeds of a life insurance policy, unless the benefciary of the policy is the estate, are not subject to any conditions of the will. It is outside of probate.


It is the responsibility of the person holding the life insurance policy to keep the beneficiary data updated as necessary. In the scenario in the question, the ex girlfriend was listed as the beneficiary ... and will be awarded the proceeds from the policy. Unfortunately, there is little the spouse can do to stop that. The beneficiary designation is binding and will hold up in a court of law.


Proceeds from a life insurance policy to a beneficiary are usually paid free from federal income tax.


If the wife is not named as a beneficiary then she would have no claim on the policy proceeds.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.