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What is another term for suction pressure?

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2005-10-30 20:29:11
2005-10-30 20:29:11

Inches of vacuum. Thirty inches of vacuum is generally considered a complete vacuum when evacuating a system before purging it with nitrogen gas to completely dry the system out before recharging it with whatever refrigerant is to be used. This assumes that what ever problem generated the need for the system to evacuated has been resolved.

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Air has a pressure, but not a suction pressure. Air pressure is measured with a barometer, you do not calculate it. Suction pressure is a concept which applies to a pump. Suction pressure = static pressure + surface pressure - vapour pressure - friction pressure.

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the suction valve is transfered fluid one pipe to another pipe at a specific pressure and quantity.

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Suction is caused by an are of negative pressure.

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Answer: The terms suction and discharge are the terms refer to hydraulics. In hydraulics if the the liquid has to be lifted or pumped to the usage area the hydraulic pump will be used . This pump will have to functions that is first suction to lift the fluid and the discharge or delivery . The familiar words in pair are lift and discharge; suction and discharge. The specification of pump for these terms are suction head and discharge head.AnswerThe suction pressure refers to the pressure of the referigerant being "sucked" back into the compressor. The suction pressure is a critical variable in ensuring the accuracy of the refrigerant charge, along with the tepmerature of that line as well. The "superheat", or heat added to the vapor in that line can be monitored in this manner.You have not mention which suction pressure... Actually Where ever the suction is presented that pressure is called suction pressure.... and suction pressure in practical cases normally always less that atmospheric pressure and in case of delivery pressure it is oppositeSaying that suction pressure is " the pressure of the referigerant being "sucked" back into the compressor " is not accurate.Simply , the suction pressure of a pump is the absolute pressure of a fluid , measured at the inlet of the pump ( in your answer , the pump is the compressor , and the fluid is whatever refrigerant. )The discharge pressure , is the absolute pressure of the liquid measured at the outlet of the pump.Obviously, the discharge pressure is usually bigger than suction pressure.

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Suction is the reduction of pressure to create a force. In the instance of liquid, suction will cause the liquid to transfer from an area of higher pressure to the area of lower pressure.

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for a given air conditioner: the faster the condenser (outdoor) fan the lower the suction pressure. the faster the evaporator (indoor) fan the higher the suction pressure.

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Atmospheric Pressureatmospheric pressure

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At very low suction pressure, the suction valves of reciprocating compressor will not work and there will be no gas in the cylinder during compression stroke, resulting some damage to the suction valves. If low suction pressure trip protection is not provided there can be some abnormal damage.

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...It will be what ever your suction pressure is.

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No, the liquid (discharge) line is the high pressure side. The suction line is the low pressure side.

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It depends if it has suction cups on its shoes or not

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When you stick a suction cup on a window you force the air out of the suction cup and you create a high pressure vaccume keeping the suction cup on the window.

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The suction cup will lose its attachment, unless it has an additional adhesive. Suction cups attached to a surface are held there by the pressure of the outside air, which is higher than the pressure under the cup. The suction cup is trying to return to its uncompressed condition, and pulls away from the surface, reducing the pressure under it.

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Aspiration means withdrawal of fluid by Vacuum or suction

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"Lower" or diastolic blood pressure.

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what is suction pressure of r407a

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when pressure on the suction side of the pump drop below the vapour pressure of the liquid, vapour forms. It's caused because of insufficient suction head, high suction lift, excessive friction head, or high liquid temperature.

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get a small pin and pit it right through the plunger. it will release the suction pressure =]

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first of all the term NPSH should be clear.It is pressure which should be available at the eye of the pump impeller,so as to avoid vaporisation of liquid. Second which arises ,how this liquid will vaporise?Ans-if a vapour pressure of a liquid falls at constt temperature or temperature of liquid is raised at constt pressure it vaporises.In case of pump it's mostly the first case. Now,how to manitain NPSH. NPSHa> NPSHr (always) where NPSHa= available NPSH NPSHr = Required NPSH NPSH = Hps+Hsl-Hvp-Hfl Hps= pressure acting on the eye due to pressure in the suction drum. Hsl = pressure acting due to height of liquid in the suction line. Hvp= vapour pressure of the liquid Hfl= head loss due to friction losses Thus, to maintain the NPSH, variables in hand are,Hps and Hsl.increase the height of the suction line or increase the pressure of the suction drum.

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The joints in the spine are under negative pressure (suction). When the suction is broken, like when you crack your knuckles, the suction release creates a cracking sound sound.

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On the discharge line with the relief of the pressure control back to suction

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I think, that's refer from your system. If you manipulate the surface pressure of the water, you will get a big value of water suction head with higher surface pressure. CMIIW....

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Sounds like a blockage in the system on the high pressure side.


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