answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2007-06-22 15:33:52
2007-06-22 15:33:52

I was offered $5700 for mine

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Yes. Smithsonian was the trade brand name used by Crescent Fire Arms Co. and later Crescent-Davis. The distributor/retailer was H & D Folsom.


Plymouth was a trade brand shotgun made by Crescent Fire Arms Co and later by Davis-Warner Arms Co. It was distributed/retailed by H & D Folsome. Shotgun Markings also lists a hammer double barrel by an unknown Belgian maker and indicates the retailer was Spear & Co.


Crescent Fire Arms Co. and Crescent-Davis Arms Corp. They made the gun with only Smithsonian stamped on it in both single & double barrel and in several gauges


Serial numbers were not required before 1968. Check the barrel and receiver.


Yes, I have one in hand but don't know what year it was manufactured. With a six letter serial number.


It was madein the1930s by J Stevens Arms Springfield Mass. ( Crescent was bought out by them in 1932) and the name changed to Crescent - Davis. Value can range from 100. to 500. depending on condition.


There is no model 508 listed. A single barrel 410 Crescent Davis lists at: Exc V.G. Good Fair Poor 175 125 100 75 50


Smithsonian was the trade brand name used by Crescent Fire Arms Co. and later Crescent-Davis. The distributor/retailer was H & D Folsom. Likely production in the 1900-1925 time period. No relation to the Smithsonian Institute.


Single barrel from 25 - 125, side by side from 25 to 195. All depends on condition



N R Davis & Sons operated from 1883 to 1917. Value of a fully functioning double is $150-$250.


You won't find history of any particular Crescent double barrel model. They basically made one or two models and marked them with whatever name the retailer wanted. Well over 100 different trade names have been found on Crescents. The company was formed in Norwich, Ct, in 1892 and bought by H&D Folsom Sporting Goods the following year. Around 1926 Crescent was sold to Stevens (which was already owned by Savage) then merged with NR Davis (which they also purchased) to form Crescent-Davis Arms. The Crescent name disappeared completely about 1932.


This name was put on shotguns by Crescent Fire Arms Co, Davis-Warner Arms Corp., and also by at least one unidentified Belgian maker for Spear and Company.


Only by comparing it to known products of the possible makers. Joe Vorisek's book lists the makers as Crescent, Crescent-Davis, J. Stevens, and Iver Johnson. But since Stevens/Savage bought Crescent and Davis, and operated them as a separate company for a few years then took over the line as Stevens, there will be identical guns from those three company names and no way to determine if it was made in 1925 by Crescent, 1930 by Crescent-Davis, or 1935 by Stevens.


There's not much information about any particular Crescent firearm, but the company operated from 1892 to 1932 as a subsidiary of H&D Folsom Sporting Goods. The company produced millions of single and double barrel shotguns with over 100 different trade names. Crescent was purchased by the Stevens division of Savage Arms and merged with another purchased company as Crescent-Davis for a few years and then disappeared into the Stevens operation.


Around $100-$200, depending on the exact model, and whether it has damascus steel marrels. AMERICAN GUN CO. firearms were manufactured by Crescent Firearms Co. and distributed by H. & D. Folsom Co. Crescent produced moderate cost guns under nearly 100 different brand names. A brief history of Crescent- CRESCENT FIRE ARMS CO. & CRESCENT-DAVIS ARMS CO. Previous manufacturers and trademarks manufactured circa 1888-1931 in Norwich, CT. In 1888, George W. Cilley bought out the defunct Bacon Arms Co. of Norwich, CT. He then formed an alliance with Frank Foster, and borrowed enough money to form the Crescent Fire Arms Company. Cilley and Foster each held several firearms patents, and both were highly qualified in firearms design and manufacture. Production began with single shot tip-up shotguns that had an external side hammer. Double barrel shotgun production was started in 1891. In 1893, they began making bicycle chains, and that same year, H&D Folsom took over the company's financial control. Early in the 1890s, Crescent built a rifle that resembled the Remington No. 4. A very rare Crescent was the .410 bore shotgun pistol, which was introduced in the 1920s. In 1929, N.R. Davis Firearms Co., then owned by Warner Arms Corp., merged with Cresent to become Crescent-Davis Arms Co. Because of financial crisis, business continued to decline, and they were forced to sell out. Savage Arms Co. acquired Davis-Cresent in 1931, assembled guns from the remaining parts, and these guns were sold under the Crescent name only.



This was a trade name sold by Belknap Hardware. Manufacturers included Crescent Fire Arms, Crescent-Davis Arms, Davis-Warner Arms, Iver Johnson, and J. Stevens A&T Co.


Around 1892 Crescent firearms manufactured shotguns under a variety of names. In 1930 H & D Folsom Arms sold their Crescent Fire Arms company to Savage Arms and Savage combined Crescent with Davis Warner Arms Corp., as Crescent-Davis Arms Corporation. Your shotguns value, in good condition, is about $150.


Newport was a brand name used by Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co, Chicago (1882-1962) on shotguns made by Crescent Arms Co, J. Stevens Arms, Crescent-Davis, and probably other manufacturers.


It is all in the condition, values range from 100. for a poor but complete gun to 700. in "like new" shape. This gun is in fact made by J Stevens Arms who bought Crescent in 1931. So this should hold a $400 to 500 in average condition.


Most likely, yes. Essex was a trade name used by Crescent-Davis firearms Co on shotguns made for the Belknap Hardware Co of Louisville KY back in the 18 and 1900's. The term "Hardware guns" is derived from the Crescent Co, as they made guns for just about anybody, and would put any name on the gun if you ordered 10 or more.


NR Davis and Sons operated from 1893 to 1917. Is that close enough?


You may have some success at the shotgun world website, (shotgunworld.com) there is a vast network of collectors and shotgun experts there that may be able to help




Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.