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Answered 2016-09-22 06:50:49

I'm assuming you mean when they're bonded to each other - oxygen is more electronegative, so it will have a partial negative charge, and hydrogen will have a partial positive charge.

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oxygen atoms have -2 charge where hydrogen generally have +1



Water molecules are very cohesive due to the relative positive charge of their hydrogen atoms compared to their oxygen atoms, this allows them to form strong hydrogen bonds in a tetrahedral configuration.


Because oxygen has a 2- charge and hydrogen has a +1 charge.


Hydrogen peroxide has two atoms of hydrogen and oxygen.



the basic formula is C6H12O6, so there are twice as many number of hydrogen-to-oxygen atoms. This applies to carbon atoms as well when compared to hydrogen atoms.


Water is made of 3 atoms- one oxygen and 2 hydrogen. The hydrogen have an opposite charge to oxygen resulting in a polar charge.


The hydrogen atoms possess a partial positive charge, and the oxygen is the negative end.


The oxygen end of a water molecule has a partial negative charge. The hydrogen atoms have a partial positive charge.


They are partial charges, making the water molecule polar. This occurs because the oxygen atom is more electronegative than the hydrogen atoms, and therefore holds the electrons more tightly than the hydrogen atoms. This gives the oxygen atom a partial negative charge and the hydrogen atoms a partial positive charge.


Water is known as polar solvent. The oxygen atoms are regions of (-) charge and the hydrogen atoms are areas of (+) charge.


Yes, hydrogen atoms and oxygen atoms are very different.


Water molecules are polar because of the large electronegativity difference between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms. The oxygen atom is more electronegative than the hydrogen atoms. This causes the oxygen end of the molecule to have a slightly negative charge, and the hydrogen end to have a slightly positive charge.


A water molecule consists of one Oxygen atom and two Hydrogen atoms. There is a surplus of electrons on the Oxygen side of the molecule which leads to a partial negative charge near the the Oxygen atom and a partially positive charge near the Hydrogen atoms.


Water has two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. The hydrogen atoms have partial positive charges and the oxygen atom has a partial negative charge.


H2O (hydrogen & oxygen).


The water molecule does not have a negative charge. The oxygen end of the molecule has a partial negative charge and the hydrogen end has a partial positive charge. This is because the oxygen atom is more electronegative than the hydrogen atoms, and tends to hold the shared electrons more tightly than the hydrogen atoms.


Positive. Since the Oxygen atom has a higher electronegativity (it is more likely to draw in electrons) than the Hydrogen atoms, the electrons that are shared in the two oxygen/hydrogen bonds will move closer to the Oxygen atom. This will give the Oxygen atom a slightly positive charge and the 2 Hydrogen atoms a slighty negative charge. Because of this, a water molecule is considered polar.




Each water molecule is made up of one oxygen atom and two hydrogen atoms which are bonded together in an asymmetrical manner. Oxygen has a much greater electronegativity (3.44) compared to hydrogen (2.2) and so attracts the bonding electrons more strongly. This results in an excess negative charge at the oxygen atom and corresponding positive charges at the hydrogen atoms.


The top half of the hydrogen atom has a negative charge. The bottom half (where the oxygen atoms are) has a positive. So the negative half of the hydrogen atom attracts with the positive half with the oxygen atoms.


Glucose (C6H12O6) has 12 hydrogen atoms and 6 oxygen atoms.


Yes, and the hydrogen atoms carry a slight positive charge.



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