Repossession
Debt Collection
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What length of time do creditors have to come in and try to claim assets owed to them that were previously charged off from an estate?

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2008-09-07 21:21:50
2008-09-07 21:21:50

== == In Massachusetts, creditors have 1 year from the date of death to notify the executor or administrator of the estate of the outstanding debt. This has just happened to me in North Carolina: My attorney ran it in the paper for 30 days and that was all. In Kentucky, an estate has to remain open for a minimum of 6 months for the purpose of allowing enough time for creditors to come forward and make claims against the estate for debts. If it has been charged off the estate, they are merely harassing you.

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