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2010-07-28 04:38:10
2010-07-28 04:38:10

Age the age of majority, when they are also allowed to end visitation to school.

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It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state. It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state.


A 13 year old can go before a judge and tell them that they do not want to visit their non custodial parent anymore. A 13 year old is old enough to know if they want to continue a relationship with a parent.


I would think it would be 18 or if you can prove the noncustodial parent is causing harm to the child.


Only if they are past the age of majority, which is when they are legally old enough to make that choice. see links below


For our daughter it was 18 years of age. or he or she can become emancipated at 16 years of age through family court.. which in terms deems the minor an adult. The person is no longer required to visit non custodial parent.


This may be sufficient to warrant a change of custody to prohibit unsupervised visitation with the child and the non-custodial parent. It should also be reported to the licensing board.


If you're in the US, the age is 18. Until then, if the parent has court-ordered visitation, it has to be followed. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason.


Well if the noncustodial parent wishes to take the kid the judge might give the parent custody if there is not a bad reason the parent did not get custody in the first place hope I helped you



hello I am going through the same thing, my son is 16 years old and doesnt want to visit his dad because of his inconsistency of being involved in his life his father has just filed for visitation rights and I dont know whats going to happen. I hope the court listens to my sons wishes, even if he decides to visit only sometimes



Assuming the visitation is court ordered, then no. If there is a legitimate reason the minor does not want to spend time with the parent (ie they're a drug abuse), then the custodial parent needs to petition the court for a modification of the visitation order.


No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.


Depends on why the parent is non-custodial. If he is unfit they can not. The court usually listen to a teen that old but there are no guarantees they will decide on his favor.



The visitation schedule for the non-custodian parent who does not know the child should start out slow. You may want to stay when the child is with the parent he or she does not know.


If you live in the US, they have to be 18. Until that age if the parent has court-ordered visitation it has to be followed. If there is a valid reason (and it must be a very valid reason) the child does not want to visit with the other parent, you need to petition the court to modify the visitation order.


It depends on why the living parent didn't have custody. If the custodial parent has passed away the noncustodial parent has to apply for custody in court.


unless the father is abusing the 17yr old physically or emotionally then there isn't much of a choice. Court order visitation is mandatory unless the parent with visitation relinquishes his or her right to do so. The option is for the custodial parent to file a petition on behalf of the minor requesting the visitation order be amended or rescinded. A 17-year-old would be given the opportunity to present reasons for the request to the judge, likewise, the parent who holds visitation rights would be allowed to file an objection.


No. That issue must be brought before the court by the custodial parent with a request for modification of the existing visitation order. The court will investigate the matter and render a decision.No. That issue must be brought before the court by the custodial parent with a request for modification of the existing visitation order. The court will investigate the matter and render a decision.No. That issue must be brought before the court by the custodial parent with a request for modification of the existing visitation order. The court will investigate the matter and render a decision.No. That issue must be brought before the court by the custodial parent with a request for modification of the existing visitation order. The court will investigate the matter and render a decision.


If the parent has court-ordered visitation, yes. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason, nor will they look kindly on a custodial parent who request it without a very good reason.



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