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Answered 2008-04-23 04:49:59

It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state. It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state.

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No. If a custody action has been filed then the court has jurisdiction over the child and has the authority to render a decision. It would not be wise for the parent with present custody to flee.No. If a custody action has been filed then the court has jurisdiction over the child and has the authority to render a decision. It would not be wise for the parent with present custody to flee.No. If a custody action has been filed then the court has jurisdiction over the child and has the authority to render a decision. It would not be wise for the parent with present custody to flee.No. If a custody action has been filed then the court has jurisdiction over the child and has the authority to render a decision. It would not be wise for the parent with present custody to flee.


Yes. The parent with legal custody must make that type of decision for the child. The NC parent should discuss the matter with the custodial parent and that parent must make the arrangements.Yes. The parent with legal custody must make that type of decision for the child. The NC parent should discuss the matter with the custodial parent and that parent must make the arrangements.Yes. The parent with legal custody must make that type of decision for the child. The NC parent should discuss the matter with the custodial parent and that parent must make the arrangements.Yes. The parent with legal custody must make that type of decision for the child. The NC parent should discuss the matter with the custodial parent and that parent must make the arrangements.


Child custody is a legal term used to refer to a parent or guardian given legal authority to take care of a child and make decision for the child. Its common in divorce proceedings for a court to award custody to one parent or joint custody.


Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.


The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.


The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.


It means that another person is appointed to receive decision making powers as far as the child is concerned. Depending on the jurisdiction, it may also include physical custody (where the child lives) but may not. One parent may have physical custody (the child lives with them) but another parent, legal custody. It can get pretty complicated and mind boggling. You'd have to look at the custody document to get a good idea of what it means in your particular case.


That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.


Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.Yes. As long as the parents do not have joint legal custody the custodial parent has the legal right to make that decision.


There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.


Yes, a parent who is unemployed can have custody.


The guidelines are basically the same in every state but obviously there are a few minor differences. Joint custody consists of Primary Custody & Secondary Custody. The parent with primary custody is who the child lives with & the other parent has secondary custody. Depending on the age of the child & the state in which they reside, the court may let them determine where they choose to live. Or if both parents agree on the child's decision then the child can live with either parent.


AnswerYes. The best interests of the children would be the court's focus.


It means one parent is granted physical custody of the child the majority of time (in other words, your primary residence is with that parent). However one parent may have primary physical custody but joint legal custody where the other parent has equal decision making power in the child's life.



No, the parent that originally had custody of the child no longer recieves child support after the custody arrangements change. However, the court must be notified of the change so the child support order can be modified. The parent with custody receives the child support.


It is possible that a parent can solely take a decision for his or her child. However; It mainly depends on the agreement between parents.


can an adoptive parent give up custody of their child back to the biological parent


If the child goes to live with a non custodial parent, then the non custodial parent has custody. If you are asking about legal custody, the non custodial parent would have to petition the courts to change the custody order.


Joint Legal: Both parents are suppose to have equal decision making rights, but child resides primarily with one parent while the other pays full child support. Joint Physical Custody: Parents have equal decision making rights and the child resides with each parent an equal amount of time.


Depends on the state. Technically child support is paid to the custodial parent. This means the parent actually has custody, not a parent who allows their child to live elsewhere. Therefore, if the custodial parent does not have custody, check your state laws. Another adult can be allowed to collect child support for the benefit of the child, but a non-custodial biological father can also be given custody in this case.


The term "primary joint custody" is contradictory. Primary (or sole) custody means one parent has full rights of decision as to the care of the child, including education, medical treatment, etc. Joint custody means parents share equal rights in major decisions such as moving the child to another state or country. One parent cannot legally take such action without the other's consent or without permission of the court.


Full custody means that one parent (the one that the child lives with) has the child 24/7 and the other parent has visitation with the child/children, sole custody is when one parent has the child 24/7 and the other parent is not allowed visitation.


State laws vary widely in the United States but in almost every state the biological parent has sole rights to custody of the child. If a custodial parent dies the surviving natural parent will normally be granted custody of the child.


Also called sole custody, it means one parent makes all decisions as regards the child's life, including medical. The other parent can have visitation, but no decision making power.



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