History of the United States
US Coins

Where are us pennies made?

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2010-12-05 02:30:01
2010-12-05 02:30:01

Modern circulation pennies are made by the US Mint in either Philadelphia or Denver. You can visit their website www.usmint.gov to learn more about the US Mint and its programs.

Coins made in Denver have a small D under the date. Cents from Philadelphia don't have a mint mark. They're the only denomination made since 1980 that doesn't carry a mint mark.

Up to 1955 and from 1968 to 1974, San Francisco made cents for circulation. These have an S mint mark and very occasionally still turn up in change.

When demand for cents has been very high the West Point Mint also makes small numbers of cents, but these don't have mint marks either and look exactly like Philadelphia cents.

AnswerProof collector coins (packaged in the proof sets) are made at the San Francisco Mint.
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The US never made silver pennies. In 1943 the US made steel pennies. These are often mistaken for silver pennies.

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Pennies are zinc, but they are copper plated.

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According to the US Mint, 4010.83 million pennies were made in 2010.

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According to the US mint, 6015.2 million pennies were made in 2012.

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Nobody. The US never made silver pennies. In 1943 the US made steel pennies. These are often mistaken for silver. In 1943 Abraham Lincoln was on the US penny.

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No. U.S. pennies are not magnets.

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No, but in 1943 US pennies were made from steel coated zinc. These have become a collector favorite.

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The US has never made silver pennies. It would cost way to much to make silver pennies because of the value of silver. Many people think that in 1943 pennies were made out of silver however they are actually made out of zinc and steel.

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On US cents from 1793 to 1958 .

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The metal copper- however, US pennies are now copper plated zinc.

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Zinc is the base of US pennies made after 1982.

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No. No US pennies were made in gold.

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Pennies are made of Zinc and Copper

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In 1961 pennies were made of 95% copper and 5% zinc.

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Since 1982, US pennies have been made of zinc with a thin copper coating. The specific percentages are 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper.

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If you're referring to US half cents, they were minted from 1793 to 1857. British half pennies were minted from the medieval period until 1967; decimal half pennies were made from 1971 to 1984.

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The materials used to mint pennies has changed. Originally, pennies were made of almost pure copper. Today, British pennies are made of nickel/steel blanks coated in copper, and US "pennies" (actually cents) are made of zinc blanks coated in copper.

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mostly made out of copper

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US "pennies" (cents) are made of 97.5% zinc plated with 2.5% copper Canadian and European cents as well as British pennies are made of copper-plated steel.

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Pennies are made mostly in Philadelphia and Denver. The process of making pennies is called minting.

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1828 US cents and British pennies were both made out of copper.

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US pennies (since 1982) have been made of zinc (97.5%) with a thin layer of copper (2.5%) outside.

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The US has never made silver pennies. It would cost way to much to make silver pennies because of the value of silver. Many people think that in 1943 pennies were made out of silver however they are actually made out of zinc and steel. So actually they have never been in circulation.

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I don't uderstand you question. If you are refering to how many pennies the US has made i don't think that there is a way to figure that out due to the fact that no one knows how many pennies were made each year in the mints early years.

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In 2007, the three US Mints produced 7,401,200,000 pennies. That is equal to 40,800,441 pounds of the one cent pieces.


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