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Where can you find 240V extension cords for appliances such as air conditioners?

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2008-11-03 06:15:08
2008-11-03 06:15:08

My guess is to make one. Go to an electrical supply house or homedepot, lowes. etc. I would guess 6-2 with ground? Attach two connections at the ends and go. Personally I wouldn't make an extenstion cord of this nature, but you asked! The lack of availability of an extension cord similar to one asked about is a clue to the advisability of using one. It isn't a good idea to extend cords like this. If you must get a cord, try a marine supply outfit where they have power cables for dockside use. But you'll have to pony up for them. They don't come cheaply.

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Answer for UK, Europe and countries running a 50 Hz supply service.There are quite a few appliances that use a 240V line. Air conditioners, fridges, washers and dryers all use the 240V line.Answer for Canada, USA and countries running a 60 Hz supply service.In North America only the larger appliances use 240 volts. The hot water tank, stove, range top, baseboard heating and clothes dryer are the main appliances that use the higher voltage.

Yes you plug a 240v appliance into 220v receptacle.

You don't unless it shows a dual rating on the appliance.

You can use US appliances, but only if you get an adaptor. The island uses 3-pin UK plugs and 240v electrical appliances.

AC voltage is 220v in Germany.Normal household appliances are 240v, some dual phase appliances such as cookers are 400v.

Australia uses 240V, while North America uses 110V, so in order for your appliances to work you will need to get an adapter.

Yes, it can be and there is no problem at all Because most of the electrical appliances are made to work on 220v - 240v so it can also be plugged into a 240v outlet.

In the US, both 120v and 240v will be needed for your home, as different appliances need different voltages. Your TV needs 120V, while your electric dryer and stove will need a 120V/240V supply. If you have an electric water heater, or central AC unit, they will need a 240V supply.

Generally 220v anything works easier or with less effort so can be cheaper to run. Appliances that run off 240V draw less current than 120V appliances so lighter wiring and fixtures can be used. However, 240V is more prone to arcing than 120V. Also, 240V is more likely to blow you away than 120V, whereas 120V is more likely to "grab" (Cause your muscles to involuntarily contract, i.e. making your hand grab a conductor) you. Also the US uses 120V because Edison originally used 100V. It was upped over the years to cope with demand. The US also has 240V in residential service for large appliances like ovens and dryers.

Standard US power is 110-120v at 60 hz. Heavy appliances are usually 220-240v at 50 hz.

This change is not needed. If you look closely at the cord you should see the voltage rating of 300 volts. Flexible cords are usually rated at 300 volts in smaller sizes and 600 volts in larger cords.

if i have a breaker that has a 120/240v and my dryer has a 240v plug can i change the receptacle to a 240v

Some appliances may work, but I imagine most would either blow a fuse or just burn out. Definately not advised unless you use a transformer. With the right transformer everything should work fine.

All extension cord have the ability to be used on 240 volts. If you look on the cord you will see a voltage of 300 volts. This means that this extension cord has the ability to have up to 300 volts applied to it.To use the cord from a 240 volt receptacle the ends have to be changed. Personally I have a couple of portable devices around home that need 240 volts. I made two short 12 inch adapter cords. One has a male cap (plug) to plug into the 240 volt receptacle on one end and the other end of this short cord has a female 120 volt plug configuration. The other short cord has the reverse of this. This allows you to use an ordinary extension cord with our having to change its ends. As the extension cord is a temporary voltage supply and not a permanent installation, the using of the 120 volt cord end caps is acceptable.

No, use only the voltage for the appliance that your utility system is supplying to your residence. If your system is 208 volts use 208 volt appliances. Likewise if the utility system is 240 volts use only 240 volt appliances. 208 appliances on 240 will overheat the appliances and 240 appliances on 208 will not produce the wattages that the manufacturer recommends for cooking and drying.

An oven uses 240v power. <<>> In North America all of the larger appliances are operated from 240 volts. This included range, dryer, hot water tank, baseboard heaters electric furnace and heat pumps. In Europe and UK all appliances use 240 volts.

At best, nothing will happen; the appliances won't run. At worst, the appliance will try to run on the lower voltage, fail to do so, and damage some of the mechanical parts. This is one of the reasons why a 240V appliance has a different plug than a 110V item.

the wires coming off double pole will give you 240 volts,110 each the black and white hook to these,doesn`t matter which way,ground to ground Ground is always ground, Black and white are your two "hots." You will need a dedicated circuit, you cannot run this off existing 120V wiring. A 15A 240V circuit should be more than sufficient. If this is a permanent instalation you can use 14/2 wire as you normally would, and wire it as you normally would with the exception of the 240V breaker. If you install switches, timers, etc. Make sure they are all rated for 240V. Remember, you can't just mix-and-match between 120 and 240V. 240 appliances will not run on 120 and 120 appliances will burn up on 240.

The easiest thing to do is use the appliances one at a time. If you need to use them simultaneously, then the ONLY safe way to do it is to have a qualified electrician add a second complete circuit for the second appliance.

I was a US Government employee. Me and my family were sent to England where we resided for 7 years. We shipped all our household goods with us including all our US electrical appliances. Once there, we purchased transformers which come in various wattage ratings. The transformer actually converts the 220voltage down to the required 120 volts for US products. Anything with a motor would only be turning at 50 cycles a second vise the 60 cycles of US current. This would only affect the playing speed of say a record player (obselete now) but radios, toasters, coffee pots or anything of that nature would work fine. Hope this has helped. You need a transformer, as mentioned above. Note that for running UK appliances in the US that is not necissarily true, as the US has 120/240V service. You'd just need a special outlet for your 240V appliances. +++ Some, but by no means all, electronic appliances have 110/240V switches to allow use on either system.

120v and 240v cords usually have different end configurations and will not plug into the different recepticles. However, if you changed the plug end, and the cord has the proper size rating, then yes, you could use the same cord. But, it also depends on the cord too. Most 120v cords only have three wires in them. One "hot one "neutral" and one "ground" wire. A 240v cord would have FOUR wires, two "hot" wires, one neutral wire, and one ground wire. Therefore, if you changed the voltage from 120v to 240 using a 3 wire cord, you'd not have a ground wire and that could be VERY dangerous. Note that occasionally a 240v device (e.g. some motors) will only need three wires (red,black,green, no neutral) and can be wired with a 120v cord if the cord is rated for 240v.

Can run 208v heater on 240v?


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