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See www.world-nuclear.org for country by country information:

INFORMATION PAPERS
NUCLEAR BASICS
Outline History of Nuclear Energy The Nuclear Debate Glossary
FACTS AND FIGURES
World Nuclear Power Reactors 2008-09 and Uranium Requirements Nuclear share figures, 1998-2008 - May 2009 Uranium production figures, 1998-2008 - June 2009
COUNTRY AND REGIONAL BRIEFINGS
Uranium in Africa Nuclear Power in Argentina Nuclear Power in Armenia Australia's Uranium Nuclear Energy Prospects in Australia Nuclear Power in Belgium Nuclear Power in Brazil Nuclear Power in Bulgaria California's Electricity Nuclear Power in Canada Nuclear Power in Canada Appendix 1: Ontario Energy Policy Nuclear Power in Canada Appendix 2: Alberta Tar Sands Uranium in Canada Uranium in Canada Appendix 1: Brief History of Uranium Mining in Canada Uranium in Central Asia Nuclear Power in China Nuclear Power in China Appendix 1: Government Structure and Ownership China's Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Power in Czech Republic Nuclear Energy in Denmark Nuclear Power in Finland Nuclear Power in France Nuclear Power in Germany Nuclear Power in Hungary Nuclear Power in India Nuclear Energy in Iran Nuclear Power in Italy Nuclear Power in Japan Uranium and Nuclear Power in Kazakhstan Nuclear Power in Korea Nuclear Power in Lithuania Nuclear Power in Mexico Uranium in Namibia Nuclear Energy Prospects in New Zealand Nuclear Power in the Netherlands Uranium in Niger Nuclear Power in Pakistan Nuclear Power in Romania Nuclear Power in Russia Nuclear Power in Slovakia Nuclear Power in Slovenia Nuclear Power in South Africa Nuclear Power in Spain Nuclear Power in Sweden Nuclear Power in Sweden Appendix 1: Barsebäck Closure Nuclear Power in Switzerland Nuclear Power in Taiwan Nuclear Power in the United Kingdom Nuclear Power in Ukraine Nuclear Power in United Arab Emirates Nuclear Power in the USA Nuclear Power in the USA Appendix 1: US Operating Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Power in the USA Appendix 2 Power Plant Purchases: Nuclear Power in the USA Appendix 3: COL Applications US Nuclear Fuel Cycle US Nuclear Fuel Cycle Appendix 1: US Uranium Mining and Exploration US Nuclear Power Policy Emerging Nuclear Energy Countries

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3d ago

Several countries operate commercial nuclear reactors, including the United States, France, China, Russia, Japan, South Korea, and Canada. Each country has its own regulatory body overseeing the operation of these reactors to ensure safety and compliance with international standards.

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How many nuclear power plants operate in the US as of 2009?

There were 104 commercial nuclear power plants operating in the United States as of 2009.


What temperature is nuclear reactor?

Nuclear reactors typically operate at high temperatures, around 500-600 degrees Celsius (932-1112 degrees Fahrenheit) to ensure that the nuclear fuel undergoes fission and produces heat for generating electricity. The core temperature needs to be carefully controlled to prevent overheating and maintain safe operation of the reactor.


Are Nuclear Power Plants legal in the US?

Yes, nuclear power plants are legal in the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to ensure they operate safely and securely. There are currently over 90 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in the US.


Who provides nuclear energy?

Nuclear energy is typically provided by government-controlled entities or private companies that own and operate nuclear power plants. These entities produce electricity by using nuclear reactions to generate heat, which then drives turbines connected to generators. Examples include companies like Exelon, EDF, and Tokyo Electric Power Company.


How long does a nuclear reactor last?

The lifespan of a nuclear reactor can vary depending on factors such as maintenance, regulatory approvals, and upgrades. Typically, commercial nuclear reactors are designed to operate for 40-60 years, with some being granted license extensions to continue operating beyond their initial design life. After this period, decisions must be made about either decommissioning the reactor or investing in further upgrades to extend its operation.

Related questions

Explain the working principle of a nuclear reactor?

Nuclear fission is the working principle under which the nuclear reactors operate.


Who provides nuclear energy?

Nuclear energy is typically provided by government-controlled entities or private companies that own and operate nuclear power plants. These entities produce electricity by using nuclear reactions to generate heat, which then drives turbines connected to generators. Examples include companies like Exelon, EDF, and Tokyo Electric Power Company.


How many nuclear power plants operate in the US as of 2009?

There were 104 commercial nuclear power plants operating in the United States as of 2009.


Is moderation of neutrons always used to slow nuclear fission?

No, moderation of neutrons is not always used to slow nuclear fission. In some types of nuclear reactors, such as fast breeder reactors, fast neutrons are intentionally not moderated to slow down the fission process. These reactors operate using fast neutrons to sustain a chain reaction. However, in most commercial nuclear reactors, moderation of neutrons is employed to slow down the fission process and maintain a controlled chain reaction.


What temperature is nuclear reactor?

Nuclear reactors typically operate at high temperatures, around 500-600 degrees Celsius (932-1112 degrees Fahrenheit) to ensure that the nuclear fuel undergoes fission and produces heat for generating electricity. The core temperature needs to be carefully controlled to prevent overheating and maintain safe operation of the reactor.


What are the two type of reactors?

There are fission and fusion reactors. However, at present (2016) there is no commercial fusion reactor which can produce more energy than is required to operate it.


How does artificial satellite works in the Philippines?

Most artificial satellites are carried to the orbit multistage rockets or space shuttles. They get energy from the sun and also have nuclear reactors. How they operate depends on what they are designed to do.


What is the difference between nuclear power plant and nuclear reactor?

It's really just a matter of degree, all reactors produce some power. Those used in a power plant will produce perhaps 3000 to 5000 Megawatts thermal. Low power reactors producing a few kilowatts are used for experiments, teaching in universities, and for producing radioisotopes by irradiating samples, but reactors in this sort of power level would not be harnessed to produce electricity, the heat produced if large enough would be removed and rejected to the atmosphere or to a water cooling circuit. This makes them simple to operate and to start and stop as required.


Can matter be converted to energy?

Yes. We use that process when we operate atomic bombs and hydrogen bombs, and when we generate electric power or run submarines with nuclear reactors.


How many country which have nuclear atomic power?

Thirty countries of the world currently operate nuclear power stations.See the related Wikipedia link listed below for more information:


Why is nuclear power reliable?

Nuclear power is considered reliable because it can provide a continuous and steady source of electricity without being influenced by weather conditions like wind or sunlight. Nuclear plants have high capacity factors, meaning they can operate and produce electricity at a consistent rate for extended periods of time. Additionally, with proper maintenance and safety protocols, nuclear power plants can operate safely and efficiently.


How do operate atomic battery?

The terms atomic battery is used to describe a device which uses energy from the decay of the radioactive isotopes to generate electricity. They are like nuclear reactors but only difference is they wont use chain reaction.