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Who invented the exclamation mark?

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Wiki User
2009-09-07 05:02:20
2009-09-07 05:02:20

Answer No one actually knows who invented the exclamation mark, although we can be certain that it was not the person above. This site says that it may have developed from some latin characters, and estimates the timeframe in which it was popularized: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exclamation_mark

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what year was the exclamation mark invented in

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statement: Add an exclamation mark.exclamation: Add an exclamation mark.

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An upside down exclamation mark could be written as an "i". EX: (exclamation mark)=! (upside down exclamation mark)=i The "upside down exclamation mark" is really the letter "I" but lower case.

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There is no difference between an exclamation mark and an exclamation point. They are two names for the same thing.

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in sentences there can be an exclamation mark in it!

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If you are asking a question, you need a question mark. If you are making an exclamation, you need an exclamation point. "Is this a question?" "Of course it is!"

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"Between" an exclamation mark? Exclamation marks do not change the normal rules of capitalization.

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Exclamatory sentence will end with an exclamation mark.

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An exclamation mark comes at the end of a sentence, and you generally do not begin a new sentence with the word and, so in general you will not have the word and after an exclamation mark.

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No, do not put a period after a exclamation mark, it would make you look stupid!.

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to loveAnother AnswerThe exclamation mark (!) is used to project emphasis on a sentence.

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Also called an exclamation mark

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Normally, you would not use both a question mark and an exclamation point in the same sentence. If a sentence is interrogative, it is not an exclamation. An interrogative sentence ends in a question mark, and an exclamation ends in an exclamation point.

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An exclamation mark is used to express strong feelings or a high volume.

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Yes, it is possible for an exclamation mark to be followed by a question mark in the same sentence, but it certainly depends on the context. The exclamation would have to form part of the question.

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period,exclamation point.and exclamation mark

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It doesn't require an exclamation mark but, yes, it's acceptable.

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Exclamation Mark - album - was created on 2011-11-11.

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Roger Exclamation's daughter Samantha created it when he died. He was a super excited guy and she wanted to express it

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It means an expression of surprise, pain or anger, etc and is denoted in print with this mark: ! Often people say or write 'exclamation' when they mean 'exclamation mark'.

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someone else- It is an exclamation mark. me- well i think it would be an exclamation point because at the end of the thing it has a dot. Like a point. So i think it should be a point and not a mark. me- But exclamation mark is what it is called.

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Your question actually points the way to the answer. If the sentence is a question, it should end with a question mark. When you include an exclamation within a question, you also include the exclamation point within the full stop of the sentence.

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You can use an exclamation mark or a question mark depending on the inflection. "Excuse me!" or "Excuse me?" are both valid usages.

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we use exclamation mark for "not equal to" function. for example: if we want to write 3 is not equal to 4

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You normally use an exclamation mark after a command. "Come here!" is a command.


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