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Answered 2014-01-08 23:49:54

The Roman Catholic Church was unhappy with the Reformers because they went againist the Roman Catholic Church.

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It is true that reformers found many faults with the practices of the Catholic Church.


Roman Catholic AnswerTo the best of my knowledge, they weren't unhappy with the Church.


Reformers set up a system of free public elementary schools. The Catholic Church was in charge of education previously.



There were no reformers. The Catholic church was in full control of the society.


Roman Catholic AnswerTo the best of my knowledge, they weren't unhappy with the Church.


.Catholic AnswerBecause the Church would not grant him an annulment of his valid marriage to Catherine.


Well, the Catholic Church itself did not really change its doctorines. The Church is incapable of changing doctrines, as they are revealed by God, and not something made up by people. Some of the people within the Catholic Church were abusing the doctorines and practices around the time of the reformation. For example, some people were buying and selling indulgences, which is condemmed by the Catholic Church. Many Protestant Reformers were unhappy about these types of abuses.


The reformers were trying to draw attention to the problems with the Catholic Church.


To go against the catholic church.


Roman Catholic AnswerFor the most part, people did not want the Catholic Church to reform. They were too busy leading their lives, and trying to lead a good life to worry about such things. The primary reason that the "reformers" called for the Church to reform was sin - they were uncomfortable with what they were doing, and they figured it was easier to make a Church that didn't ask so much of them.Roman Catholic AnswerIf you are referring to the sixteenth century in your question, the answer is that people were not, on the whole, angry with the Catholic Church. For the most part, people were too busy leading their lives to worry about such things, although they were very upset when the "reformers" thrust them into a conflict with the Church which they had grown up with, and trusted.


he disagreed with the sale of indulgences


The overall corruption of the church was a big concern. The biggest example of the church's corruption was the selling of "indulgences" by the Pope and the Catholic Church.


.Catholic AnswerThere were no reformers outside the Catholic Church, there were only protesters who left the Church and formed their own ecclesial communities. The Catholic Church was established by Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ, who sent the Holy Spirit to guide it always. Our Blessed Lord guaranteed that the Church, which is HIS Mystical Body, and His Bride, would remain spotless till the end of the world. You are asking about the protestant revolutionaries like Martin Luther, and Henry VIII. They were in no sense "reformers", that is a gross misnomer.


Catholics are Christians. Martin Luther founded the Lutheran Protestant Denomination of Christianity after he was unhappy with the Catholic Church.


The people who were unhappy with the Roman Catholic Church split off from the traditional church and set up what is now the Protestant Churches. One of the main leaders behind this movement was a German named Martin Luther.


To get an answer to your question, you would have to specify what period of the Church you were looking at. There have been people reforming the Church in England for many centuries.


.Catholic AnswerBasically a grudge against a Church which held to the moral teachings of Our Blessed Lord, Jesus Christ, and told them both that they had to be moral, and that the faith could not change.


Catholics call them heretics, Protestants call them reformers.


By bringing out into the open what they perceived as false doctrines and ecclesiastic malpractice by the Roman Catholic Church, especially the sale of indulgences. The reformers saw this as evidence of the systemic corruption of the Church's Roman Catholic Church hierarchy, which included the Pope.


Not all Europeans broke with the fold of the catholic church.Mostly,Northern European is nation who broke from the Catholic church except Lithuania and Poland.The period when reformers attacked the teaching of the church was mostly during the end of the Medieval period and the Renaissance period.


The Catholic Church did not view them as reformers so much as revolutionaries since they sought to enact their desires without the sanction of Church authorities and ended up not reforming but rejecting those things they found problems with. The Church considers such actions heretical and thus saw them as heretics. Those that were personal responsible for these breaks are considered heresiarchs, or leaders of heresy. There were some clerics and people who strove for reform but decided to do so while staying with the Church, believing Her inviolable. Some of these reformers became saints.


It depends WHICH reformers you're talking about! Vatican II (in the 1960's) was completely different from Martin Luther (in the 1520's), even though they were both trying to reform the Roman Catholic church. You'll have to be a lot more specific with your question before you can get a meaningful answer. Which reformers, and when?


Catholic AnswerFor the most part, people did not want the Catholic Church to reform. They were too busy leading their lives, and trying to lead a good life to worry about such things. The primary reason that the "reformers" called for the Church to reform was sin - they were uncomfortable with what they were doing, and they figured it was easier to make a Church that didn't ask so much of them. .If you are referring to the sixteenth century in your question, the answer is that people were not, on the whole, angry with the Catholic Church. For the most part, people were too busy leading their lives to worry about such things, although they were very upset when the "reformers" thrust them into a conflict with the Church which they had grown up with, and trusted.


Martin Luther's reformation caused Anglicanism to arise in England. The reformers also accelerated the development of the Catholic Counter-Reformation of the Catholic Church. Wars between princes & peasant uprisings developed. Luther's message of salvation through the unmerited grace of God was not readily accepted by the Roman Catholic Church, however, his message resonated with those in Europe who sought reform in the Roman Catholic Church.



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