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An oxidation half-reaction

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Lincoln Wolf

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The reduction half-reaction of a redox reaction

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An oxidation half-reaction

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oxidation reaction takes place as it losses its electrons

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an oxidation half- reaction

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Q: What occurs at the cathode of a galvanic cell?
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Related questions

What occurs at the cathode of the galvanic cell?

The reduction half-reaction of a redox reaction


What would be the cathode in a magnesium and zinc galvanic cell?

In a galvanic cell, the less reactive metal is the cathode, where oxidation takes place. In this case the cathode is zinc.


What happens at the cathode in an electrolytic cell?

Reduction occurs at the cathode in an electrolytic cell.


What is the cathode of a galvanic cell made with magnesium and gold?

the gold electrode


What is true of both galvanic and electrolytic cells?

*electrolytic cells Oxidation occurs at the cathode


What happens in the cathode in an electrolytic cell?

Reduction occurs at the cathode in an electrolytic cell.


Electrons in a galvanic cell normally flow?

A galvanic cell is a spontaneous reaction so electron flow will occur as long as a salt bridge is present.


Where does reduction occur in an electrolytic cell?

The electrode where reduction occurs


Would a galvanic cell work without a salt bridge?

The electrolyte of a commercial galvanic cell normally extends from anode to cathode without interruption by a salt bridge. A salt bridge is normally a teaching tool to help show that: 1. Galvanic half-cells do not produce voltage 2. Conductors and insulators are not necessarily salt bridges. An electrolyte must extend from anode to cathode before the galvanic cell can produce voltage. 3. The chemical composition of the salt bridge can differ from the electrolytes in the half cells. 4. Ions travel through the salt bridge between the cell's anode and cathode. Salt bridges raise more questions than answers. For example: 1. Can the difference between an electrolyte and a conductor be defined? 2. How do ions quickly move through a solid or a long electrolyte? 3. When salt bridge composition differs from the galvanic cell electrolyte(s), must the salt bridge chemically react with the galvanic cell electrolyte(s)? 4. Why does galvanic cell voltage remain nearly constant while anode to cathode distance doubles.


How is an electrolytic cell different from a galvanic cell?

Electrons flow in the opposite direction.


What happens at the anode and cathode of a dry cell?

Oxidation occurs at the anode ("an ox") and reduction occurs at the cathode ("red cat").See the Web Link to the left for the specific reaction in a dry cell.


I don't understand. What are anodes and cathodes Positive or Negative I keep seeing different answers everywhere Thanks.?

It can be complicated depending on the type of cell one is looking at. However, here is my simple explanation.The anode is the electrode where the oxidation reaction takes place, and oxidation is the loss of electrons, so in a galvanic cell the anode is a source of free electrons and so it is negatively charged.The cathode is the electrode where reduction takes place, and reduction is the gain of electrons, so in a galvanic cell the cathode is positively charge and ready to accept negatively charged electrons.Now, the anode isn't always negative and the cathode isn't always positive. It has to do with the direction of current flow (anode = current in, cathode = current out). In an electrolytic cell, the charges on the anode and the cathode are reversed from that seen in a galvanic cell.