Bamboo

Bamboo is a flowering plant and the largest member of the grass family. This hollow plant is one of the fastest growing plant species in the world, and serves important cultural and economic roles in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and East Asia thanks to its versatility as a building material and as a food source.

1,820 Questions
Bamboo

Why is bamboo itchy?

Once my mum was sundrying bamboo to get rid of the itchy sensation that would occur if eaten or touched.

I stupidly put a piece in my mouth. After a few seconds it felt really irritable and it hurt like a b***h!

I didn't tell her I put it in my mouth thinking she'd tell me off.

I tried everything trying to get rid of the pain

Lemonade

Fresh lemon juice

Toothpaste

Mouthwash

Brushing my teeth

Rinsing my mouth

Drinking loads of water

Putting ice in my mouth

Hot water

Containing my saliva

As my glands were produ ing heck loads of it

I finally got round to telling my parents

They didn't tell me off

But were laughing crazily!

My dad told me to keep Gaviscon in my mouth

Several minutes later the pain diminished slighty

My mouth was itching mildly for several days later

So I'm guessing the molecules in the juice of the bamboo, when in contact with the skin, send some sort of weird chemical message to the brain through the nerves and the receptor is left feeling itchy/irritated

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Bamboo

What stores sell bamboo shoes?

shamboes

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Care of Fish
Bamboo

Can you put bamboo in a fish bowl?

Yes, it should not cause a problem either alive or dead.

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Bamboo

What is a bamboo thicket?

It is multiple bamboo shoots growing thickly (very close together) where it is difficult to walk through because of the density per area of the bamboo shoots.

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Bamboo

What does bamboo taste like?

Bamboo has a sour taste.

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Bamboo

What is the summary of the Pliant like a bamboo?

Pliant Like the Bamboo

There is a story in Philippine folklore about a mango tree and a bamboo tree. Not being able to agree as to which was the stronger of the two, they called upon the wind to make the decision.

The wind blew hardest. The mango tree stood fast. It would not yield. It knew it was strong and sturdy. It would not sway. It was too proud. It was too sure of itself. But finally its root gave way, and it tumbled down.

The bamboo tree was wiser. It knew it was not as robust as the mango tree. And so every time the wind blew, it bent its head gracefully. It made loud protestations, but let the wind have its way. When finally the wind got tired of blowing, the bamboo tree still stood in all its beauty and grace.

The Filipino is like the bamboo tree. He knows that he is not strong enough, to withstand the onslaught of superior forces. And so he yields. He bends his head gracefully with many loud protestations.

And he has survived. The Spaniards came and dominated him for more than three hundred years. And, when the Spaniards left, the Filipinos still stood-only much richer in experience and culture.

The Americans took place of the Spaniards. They used more subtle means of winning over the Filipinos to their mode of living and thinking. The Filipinos embraced the American way of life more readily than the Spaniard's vague promises hereafter.

Then the Japanese came like a storm, like a plague of locusts, like a pestilence-rude, relentless, cruel. The Filipino learned to bow his head low, to "cooperate" with the Japanese in their "holy mission of establishing the Co-Prosperity Sphere." The Filipino had only hate and contempt for the Japanese, but he learned to smile sweetly at them and to thank them graciously for their "benevolence and magnanimity".

And now that the Americans have come back and driven away the Japanese, those Filipinos who profited most from cooperating with the Japanese have been loudest in their protestations of innocence. Everything is as if the Japanese had never been in the Philippines.

For the Filipino would welcome any kind of life that the gods would offer him. That is why he is contented and happy and at peace. The sad plight of other people of the world is not his. To him, as to that ancient Oriental poet, the past is already a dream, and tomorrow is only a vision; but today, well-lived, makes every yesterday a dream of happiness, and tomorrow is a vision of hope.

This may give you the idea that the Filipino is a philosopher. Well he is. He has not evolved a body of philosophical doctrines. Much less has he put them down into a book, like Kant for example, or Santayana or Confucius. But he does have a philosophical outlook on life.

He has a saying that life is like a wheel. Sometimes it is up, sometimes it is down. The monsoon season comes, and he has to go undercover. But then the sun comes out again. The flowers bloom, and the birds sing in the trees. You cut off the branches of a tree, and, while the marks of the bolo* are still upon it, it begins to shoot forth-new branches-branches that are the promise of new color, new fragrance, and new life.

Everywhere about him is a lesson in patience and forbearance that he does not have to learn with difficulty. For the Filipino lives in a country on which the gods lavished their gifts aplenty. He does not have to worry about the morrow. Tomorrow will be only another day-no winter of discontent. Of he loses his possessions, there is the land and there is the sea, with all the riches that one can desire. There is plenty to spar-for friends, for neighbors and for everyone else.

No woner that the Filipino can afford to laugh. For the Filipino is endowed with saving grace of humor. This humor is earthly as befits one who has not indulged in deep contemplation. But it has enabled the Filipino to shrug his shoulders in times of adversity and say to himself "Bahala na"*.

The Filipino has often been accused of being indolent and of lacking initiative. And he has answered back* that no one can help being indolent and lacking in initiative who lives under the torrid sun which saps the vitality.

This seeming lack of vitality is, however, only one og his means of survival. He does not allow the world to be too much with him. Like the bamboo tree, he lets the winds of chance and circumstance blow all about him; and he is unperturbed and serene.

The Filipino, in fact, has a way of escaping from the rigorous problems of life. Most of his art is escapist in nature. His forefathers wallowed in the *moro-moro, the awit, and the kurido. They loved to identify themselves as gallant knights battling for the favors of fair ladies or the possession of hallowed place. And now he himself loves to be lost in the throes and modern romance and adventure.

His gallantry towards women-especially comely women-is a manifestation of his romantic turn of mind. Consequently, in no other place in Orient are women so respected, so adulated, and so pampered. For his women have enabled the Filipinos to look upon the vicissitudes of fortune as the bamboo tree regards the angry blasts of the blustering wind.

The Filipino is eminently suited to his romantic role. He is slender and wiry. He is nimble and graceful in his movements, his voice is soft, and h has the gift of language. In what other place in the world can you find a people who can carry on a fluent conversation in at least *three languages?

This gift is another means by which the Filipino as managed to survive. There is no insurmountable barrier between him and any of the people who have come to live with him-Spanish, American, and Japanese. The foreigners do not have learn his language. He easily manages to master theirs.

Verily, the Filipino is like the bamboo tree. In its grace, in its ability to adjust itself to the peculiar and inexplicable whims of fate, the bamboo tree is his expressive and symbolic national tree, it will have to be, not the molave or the narra, but the bamboo.

Another contributor said:

There is a story in Philippine folklore about a mango tree and a bamboo tree. Not being able to agree as to which was strongest of the two, they called upon the wind to make the decision.

The winds blew its hardest. The mango tree stood fast. It would not yield. It knew it was strong and sturdy. It would not sway. It was too proud. It was too sure of itself. But finally its roots gave way, and it tumbled down.

The bamboo tree was wiser. It knew it was not as robust as the mango tree. And so every time the wind blew, it bent its head gracefully. It made loud protests, but it let the winds have its way. When finally the wind got tired of blowing, the bamboo tree still stood in all its beauty and grace.

The Filipino is like the bamboo. He knows that he is not strong enough to withstand the onslaughts of superior forces. And so he yields. He bends his head gracefully with many loud protests.

And he has survived. The Spaniards came and dominated him for more than three hundred years. And when the Spaniards left, the Filipinos still stood-only much richer in experience and culture.

The Americans took the place of the Spaniards. They used more subtle means of winning over the Filipinos who embraced the American way of life more readily than the Spaniards' vague promise of the hereafter.

Then the Japanese came like a storm, like a plaque of locusts, like a pestilence rude, relentless and cruel. The Filipino learned to bow his head low to "cooperate" with the Japanese in their "holy mission of establishing the Co-Prosperity Sphere." The Filipino had only hate and contempt for the Japanese, but he learned to smile sweetly at them and to thank them graciously for their "benevolence and magnanimity."

And now that the Americans have come back and driven away the Japanese, those Filipinos who profited most from cooperating with the Japanese have been loudest in their protestations of innocence. Everything is as if the Japanese had never been in the Philippines.

For the Filipino will welcome any kind of life that the gods offer him. That is why, he is contented, happy and at peace.

The sad plight of other peoples of the world is not his. To him, as to that ancient Oriental poet, the past is already a dream and tomorrow in only a vision but today, well-lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow, a vision of hope. In like manner, the Filipino regards vicissitudes of fortune as the bamboo tree regards the angry blasts of the blustering wind.

The Filipino is eminently suited to his romantic role. He is slender and wiry. He is nimble and graceful in his movements. His voice is soft, and he has the gift of languages. In what other place in the world can you find people who can carry on a fluent conversation in at least three languages?

This gift is another means by which the Filipino has managed to survive. There in no insurmountable barrier between him and any of the people who have come to live with him-Spanish, Americans, Japanese. The foreigners do not have to learn his language. He easily manages to master theirs.

Verily, the Filipino is like the bamboo tree. In its grace, in its ability to adjust itself to the peculiar and inexplicable whims to fate, the bamboo tree is his expressive and symbolic national tree. It will have to be, not the molave nor the narra, but the bamboo

It is an essay written by a Filipino. The essay contains description of Filipinos being reflected by the characteristics of a bamboo. As the title says, Pliant like a Bamboo, Filipinos are described as flexible individuals that can withstand pressure from the different invaders that visited their country.

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Bamboo

Is a bamboo a consumer?

No bamboo is a producer, meaning that it produces a source of food for a consumer to eat.

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Bamboo

How do you treat a bamboo shoot that has gone yellow?

Bamboo shoots tend to turn yellow if they are placed in the wrong light or given the wrong kind of water. To fix it, simply place the shoot in bright, indirect light, and water it with filtered water, since tap water is full of damaging chemicals.

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Betta and Siamese Fighting Fish
Bamboo

Is bamboo poisonous to betta fish?

no it is actually good for them

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Philippines
Bamboo

What are the 7 kinds of bamboo in the Philippines?

I got eight. Kawayan tinik, kawayan kiling, bayog, botong, giant bamboo, bolo, anos and buho. Ü

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Bamboo

Is bamboo a producer a consumer or a decomposer?

consumer

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Bamboo

Step by step in making a bamboo?

what the step by step proceduresin making bamboo

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Bamboo

What is the collective noun of bamboo trees?

Clump

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Bamboo

Why should you save the bamboo forest?

Because bamboo is good for many thing a s a renewable resource. One thing is flooring.

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Bamboo

How do you permanently bend bamboo?

Try soaking it in very hot water. Then clamp it to a form to hold the shape. let it dry very well.

For live bamboo... This takes years to do. And methods vary with diameter.Basically you gradually tie or wire slight bends at at time over months or years. For more on this look up "bonsi". Try making a large steamer pot. Steam the bamboo and bend anyway you like.

535455
Bamboo

Can you eat the bamboo shoots from black bamboo?

The shoots from most bamboo are edible although some varieties contain hydrocyanic acid which can be removed by boiling. There are varieties of bamboo known for their taste. Black bamboo should be edible but it may not taste any good.

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Bamboo

What are some niches of Bengal bamboo?

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Bamboo

How bamboo protect itself?

by dieing

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Giant Pandas
Bamboo

What type of bamboo do pandas eat?

just regular old bamboo from the bamboo forest

all types of bamboo!

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Bamboo

How is bamboo edible?

Bamboo shoots or bamboo sprouts are the edible.

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Bamboo

What is the plural form of 'bamboo'?

Bamboos

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Bamboo

Why are greater bamboo lemurs hunted?

Bamboo lemurs are sometimes captured for the local pet trade, but are also hunted for food. The Malagasy people are very poor and get very little protein in their diet, so some turn to their natural resources to supplement their diet.

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Bamboo

What are the benefits of having bamboo floors?

The benefits of having bamboo floors is that they are first enviornmently friendly. They are also ver hard material, and very long lasting. They also come in different color shades.

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Bamboo

Is bamboo waterproof?

yes but no if it has a crack in it

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