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Dingoes

Members of the Canis lupus species, the dingo is a domestic dog that reverted to wild after thousands of years. Dingoes live largely independent from humans in the majority of their distribution area. The most common theory is that the dingo arrived in Australia about 4,000 years ago via Asian seafarers.

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How do the parts that make up a level of organization affect the higher levels of organization and the entire organism?

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The parts that make up a level of organization work together to contribute to the overall function of higher levels of organization. If the parts are functioning properly, the higher levels will also function properly, leading to the efficient functioning of the entire organism. However, if there are issues with the parts at a lower level, it can impact the function of higher levels and potentially disrupt the overall organism.

Who is Donna dingo?

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There is no commonly known individual named Donna Dingo. "Dingo" typically refers to a type of wild dog found in Australia.

Does a dingo hibernate?

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Dingoes do not hibernate. They are active year-round and do not go into a state of torpor like many animals that hibernate do. Instead, dingoes regulate their body temperature and activity levels to adapt to changing environmental conditions.

How many miles per hour can a dingo run?

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The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) is an Australian wolf-dog and is as fast as wolves or other wild dogs, about 50 km/hr for 600-700 meters and slower over longer distances. Canids are "endurance predators," which means they're more long-distance runners than sprinters. Appropriately, many Australian animals which could wind up as the dingo's dinner are also marathon runners.

Incidentally, the dingo is not native to Australia, in the long sense. A placental mammal, it was brought to the continent by man as much as 50,000 years ago (though some would prefer a later date). It took over the niche of the native marsupial predator, the thylacine, which finally went extinct in the 1930's.

Why were wild dogs introduced to Australia?

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Wild dogs were introduced to Australia in the 19th century to assist with controlling the population of pests such as rabbits and kangaroos. Unfortunately, these dogs, primarily dingoes, were not effective in controlling the intended pests and instead became a significant threat to native wildlife.

Can people survive on Mercury?

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No, people cannot survive on Mercury. Its extreme temperatures, ranging from -280°F (-173°C) at night to 800°F (430°C) during the day, combined with its lack of atmosphere and intense solar radiation, make it uninhabitable for humans.

What is the second level of organization in a multicellular organism?

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The second level of organization in a multicellular organism is tissues. Tissues are groups of similar cells that work together to perform a specific function in the body, such as muscle tissue or nervous tissue.

What do you call fast moving waters?

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Fast-moving waters are often referred to as rapids or currents. These conditions can be found in rivers, streams, or other bodies of water where the flow rate is high, creating turbulent and swift movements.

What are the levels of organization in a multicellular organism?

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The levels of organization in a multicellular organism are cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. Cells are the basic structural and functional units, which group together to form tissues with specific functions. Tissues then combine to form organs, which work together in organ systems to carry out complex tasks necessary for the organism's survival.

Ground dependent antennae?

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Ground-dependent antennae refer to antennas that require a physical connection to the ground in order to function optimally. These antennas rely on the ground plane to radiate or receive radio signals efficiently. Ground-dependent antennas are commonly used in mobile communication devices and radio systems where a connection to the ground plane can be established.

Dingo scientific name?

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The scientific name for a dingo is Canis lupus dingo. Dingoes are a type of wild dog found in Australia.

How do people survive?

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People survive by meeting their basic needs for food, water, shelter, and social connection. Adaptability, problem-solving skills, resourcefulness, and support from others also play key roles in helping individuals overcome challenges and thrive in different environments.

Do dingoes eat fox?

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Dingoes are carnivorous, meaning they are meat-eaters. They may occasionally eat grass as other dogs do, but grass does not form a major component of their diet.

Do dingoes have good eyesight?

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What is the average lifespan of krill?

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Krill live to be 5 years old and weigh over 1 gram

How does a dingo move?

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Eat babies.

Where do dingos eat?

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20000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000l a year

Is a Dingo cold blooded?

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dingoes are endotherms (an animal that can maintain a constant body temperature, regardless of the external temperate) which mean they are warm blooded. They are able to keep their internal temperature relatively stable due to a process called homeostasis.

Do dingoes eat kingfishers?

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dingoes will eat fledglings and injured kookaburras

What is the pressure of a dingo bite?

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Around 1,000 lbs - 1,500 lbs depending on the age and size of the Dingo.

What is the average lifespan of a fern?

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They live forever. The lady ferns alive today are ones that were alive during the ages of the dinosaurs.

How do dingoes kill their prey?

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Dingoes are nocturnal and usually travel in small packs from sunset throughout the night. In the wild state (not as pets- often used to help aborigines hunt) it howls rather than barks. They use group tactics to surround and kill their prey- which includes rabbits small animals and often livestock.

Where are most dingoes found in India?

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Kangaroos are not found in India. They are native to Australia alone - no other continent or island. Tree kangaroos can be found in New Guinea as well as in the far northern rainforests of Australia, but that is the only variety found anywhere else apart from Australia.

What do dingoes do during the day?

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they usually sleep during the day...and also play with their young ones...;D

What is a dingoes predetos?

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Dingos have no natural predators, as they are Australia's top and only land-based predator, though, the dingo does have prey that can fight back, kangaroos, etc.

The dingo's only "predator" is people.