Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut is regarded by many as one of the most successful pharaohs in ancient Egypt's history. She was also one of the earliest recorded great female rulers. It appears that there was an attempt to remove her from Egyptian history, and her image has been chiseled out of many monuments and artworks.

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What color are hatshepsut's eyes and hair?

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black hair and brown eyes
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How is hatshepsut remembered today?

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Hatshepsut was one of a few female Pharaohs of Egypt. She started out as regent for Thutmosis the III, but that wasn't enough. When he finally took over he did his best to wipe all mention of her name from the Egyptian landscape. Her beautiful temple at Deir el-Bahri was defaced but still exists as a significant example of ancient Egyptian architecture. Obliterating her name had a magical significance to the ancient Egyptians. The existence and repetition of the Name kept one alive in the afterlife, removal by an enemy was an attack on the person in the afterlife.
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How did Hatshepsut become a pharaoh?

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Hatshepsut became pharoah because thotmus III was too young to rule and so Hatshepsut became pharoah and acted like a man for the tradition.
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When was hatshepsut born and died?

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Hatshepsut was born on c.1508 BC and died in 1458 BC.
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Who was Hatshepsut?

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She was a successful Ancient Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaoh. She reigned jointly (with Tutmose III also called Tutmosis III) supposedly from about BC 1479-1458 She was the daughter of king Tutmose the first. She was the only woman to become a pharaoh. However, her name or title means The Ensigned Shepa of the South. 'Hat' means 'The Sign'. Other readings suggest "Foremost of Noble Women". In Semitic languages, 'Shepa' or 'Sheba' means a 'scribe' or 'administrator'. In this title, Hatshepsut probably intends the reader to assume both roles because she had to write laws and administer the combined kingdoms of Ethiopia and Egypt. The 'Sut' is short for 'sut-en-bat' or 'south and north'. Hatshepsut ruled Egypt in the North and Ethiopia in the South. (In those days, 'Ethiopia' really meant the northern Sudan because Africans had not migrated as far as modern Ethiopia at that time). The temple that Hatshepsut built at Deir el-Bahari is a copy of Solomon's temple at Jerusalem. After returning from Jerusalem, Hatshepsut built a copy. Her architect set it against the clefts in the cliffs. She had secret tunnels drilled into the cliff on either side. There was a stairway and causeway like Solomon's temple judging by the psalms they sang as they ascended from the Pool of Siloam up to the temple precincts. In that design, Hatshepsut and her architect could reflect the words of Solomon's poem in Song of Solomon 2:14, "Oh my dove, you are in the clefts of the rock in the secret places of the stairs". The Song of Solomon is about Israel's King and a black woman who was searching for God. Sheba-Hatshepsut was that woman. Of course, these statements could not be correct if Hatshepsut reigned over Egypt in BC 1479-1458. She would have ruled in BC 950 to meet Solomon. Since Egypt is the only ancient country to refer to a strange land its queen travelled to (i.e., "Punt") and Israel was the only one to report a visit from a Queen of Ophir (literally Aufirah or Africa) a.k.a. "Queen of Sheba", sensible analysis demandss that the so-called 'Queen of Sheba' be equated with Hatshepsut. Otherwise Hatshepsut's destination is an enigma and the origin and identity of the queen of Africa who visited Solomon is another enigma. Two enigmas like these, in parallel as it were, surely help answer each other. Hatshepsut's mystery destination was Israel and Hatshepsut was the mysterious queen who came to speak with Solomon. But those visits were in BC 950 not circa BC 1470. The dynasty that followed Hatshepsut's 18th is the 19th (logically). In the new chronology assumed here, several dynasties are eliminated from the Egyptian canon (e.g., 7th to 10th and 13th to 16th, the priestly 'kings' and some others) so the 18th and 19th become the 7th and 8th respectively but we use conventional numbers to avoid confusion). But the 19th dynasty's famous king "Ramesses II" had a son called Merneptah Baenre Meriamun Hotephir-maat. The latter ruled Egypt for about 10 years and infamously said, "Israel's Seed is cut off; the Land razed to the ground." In Israel's own history, an event of that enormity only occurred in BC 586, AD 70 (Rome) and AD 1933-45 (Nazi Germany). Obviously Merneptah's statement could only apply to BC 586. Thus the 19th dynasty has to be removed from the 13th century BC to the 7th and that confirms the placement of the 18th to 500 years more recently as well. Who was Hatshepsut? She was the famous "Queen of Sheba", or more correctly as the Biblical Hebrew should read, the Queen of Ophir-Africa who ruled/administered (i.e., sheba'd) Africa or The South (Sut, as in Suten-bat = Sudan) as Jesus in the New Testament decribed the region. Josephus Flavius noted that the queen who came to see Solomon was the "Queen of Egypt and Ethiopia". In ancient Israel, the South meant Egypt and Ethiopia, or in some contexts the deserts of the Negev. Josephus was correct. Only Hatshepsut ever ruled "Africa". No other Egyptian queen did. In fact there really were no other Egyptian queens because the chauvinistic Egyptians only wanted men to rule them. So the evidence leaves us with little choice but to accept that Hatshepsut was, as recorded in the Bible, the queen who came to visit Solomon. That's why the Biblical scribes gave so many verses to the incident because it truly was a great event in ancient history. It was so important that Jesus of Nazareth (The Christ) cited her when He castigated the Jewish leaders for rejecting Him even though he did many miracles in their sight, Hatsepsut, as her frescos tell us, responded to one sign or voice she heard one day whereas the Jewish leaders received a great many signs. They rejected Jesus but Sheba-Hatshepsut responde to one sign which in Hebrew is H'aut or h'at.
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Who was Queen Hatshepsut?

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Queen Hatshepsut was daughter of Thutmose I. She married her half brother, Thutmose II, to keep the blood line pure. When he died the crown was supposed to go to her step son, Thutmose III, but instead she took it because she thought he was way too young. She was a great ruler and wore men's clothing to prove she was their king. After she died her step son took over for 33 years alone and destroyed any remains of Hapshepsut.
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Describe Egyptian trade during the rule of hatshepsut?

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They traded beads, metal tools, and weapons for gold, ivory, ebony, and incense, a material burned for its pleasant smell.
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Why did hatshepsut wear a fake beard?

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Because most pharaohs weren't female at the time. So she wore the beard to become pharaoh.
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Why did hatshepsut trade with punt?

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to promote trading in countries with egypt and to get woods, frankincense, myrrh, ebony, ivory, leopard skins, monkeys, gold, and slaves.
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Why did they build Hatshepsut's Obelisk?

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Hatshepsut's Obelisk was built to honor her, her father, and other gods. Its inscriptions identify Horus, Re, Amun, and Tutmosis I (her father and previous ruler).
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What did Queen HAtshepsut do as pharaoh of Egypt?

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Hatshepsut encouraged trade and was a big fan of arts and architecture. She had many monuments built for her. When she died, her step-son Thutmose lll destroyed many of her monuments and buildings. However, her unique achievement was not destroyed by Thutmose. He buried it. This was her temple at Deir el-Bahari. It is unique in Egyptian architecture. Setting the temple against a cliff-face rippled with clefts in the rock-face, she drilled two tunnels deep into the cliff and built a holy altar in the centre where only High Priests would enter. These secret places were put there deliberately. To ascend the Holy place, one walks up stairs and ramps. This mimics the rise one ascended to get to Solomon's temple in Jerusalem. It is in fact a copy of Solomon's temple. But she was not the only person to build a copy. New Zealand Maori, working on the basis of legends handed down to them from ancestors living in South China in circa 1000 BC, recently constructed an entrance way in Te Papa Museum, Wellington, New Zealand that also reflects the entrance way to Solomon's temple. However, Hatshepsut also signalled another clue as to the origins of her temple. She built it to reflect Solomon's words in Song of Solomon, "Oh my dove, you are in the cleft of the rock in the secret places of the stairs". But her name Hat-Shep-Sut also can be read "The Sign of the Sheba of the South". In other words, her temple is a sign (H'at) that Hatshepsut was the "Queen Sheba (Shepa) of Ophir-Africa" (Old Testament) or Queen of the South or Sut (New Testament) and Josephus' "Queen of Egypt and Ethiopia" who saw Solomon's temple in Jerusalem in circa 950 BC. However, the Egyptologists' dates for Hatshepsut are wrong by 500 years so they do not consider this possibility. Hatshepsut was the only women of significance to rule ancient Egypt. One queen succeeded the last pharaoh of the 12th dynasty but did not survive for long and only held that position in the absence of the pharaoh who had probably died. Hatshepsut went on an expedition to Punt but the location of this place is subject to debate. If "Punt" was the Phoenicia (Pun-icea) of Hiram the Great and the Israel of Solomon, then her return to Egypt with "animal skins, myrrh trees, ebony, and gold" can be explained by her receipt of gifts from the Phoenicians. She probably returned from Israel-Phoenicia with mathematicians and engineers to help Egypt build structures such as her temple at Deir el Bahari. Between the demise of the 12th Dynasty and the 18th, Egypt had lost most of those arts and sciences but they returned in the reign of Hatshepsut - imported from "Punt". That is why "Punt's" location is so hard to fathom because of these developments in the wake of her expedition there. Therefore Somalia, places in Arabia ("south-western Asia"), somewhere else in "East Africa" or "across the Red Sea", i.e., "Edom", certainly in the 15th century BC almost certainly could not have been "Punt". But Israel and Phoenicia (Tyre, Sidon and Byblos) in the 10th century BC almost certainly could have been the place she visited with her expedition. The gifts she received from Puntites could be explained by them having been obtained by Phoenicians (Tyrians) from their exploration of the ancient world which included expeditions to parts of the African continent (Hebrew "Ophir") inaccessible to land-based or river-based expeditions setting out from Egypt which had been prostrate under the Amalekite-Hyksos conquest for 450 years after the demise of the 12th dynasty at the hands of the Hyksos or "Shepherd kings". Hatshepsut did not conquer lands though her stepson Thutmose lll did. Hatshepsut expanded Egypt's economy by trading with Africa and Asia. She also rebuilt many of Egypt's temples.
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Why was the reign of Hatshepsut considered unusual?

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Answer Because it's not likely for a woman to be a pharaoh and because she united Egypt and made it more peaceful and a lot more wealthy. Answer The above answer is broadly correct, although it is more likely her father (Thutmose I) and perhaps his predecessor who re-united Egypt. Hatshepsut certainly strengthened the unity of the Nile nations, hence peace, commerce and wealth along the region. The African nations of the Nile - today they are principally Egypt and the Sudan and modern "Ethiopia" - were sometimes united under one 'supranational' monarch ("Pharaoh". But at other times there could be several kingdoms or city-states along the Nile. Usually, the Nile river system was seen as being divided into upper-, mid- and lower-Egypt. In practical terms, the domain of the Egyptian 'pharaoh' probably never extended much further than the modern Egypt-Sudan border. A survey of the Egyptian king-lists reveals that women were indeed rare over the throne of Egypt. In Britain, and if one includes the Matildas of William I and Henry I, England (and as the UK) has had 8 queens over the last millennium. Egypt had only one in two millennia (Hatshepsut), although this expands to three with one queen ruling for a couple of years at the end of the 12th dynasty and Cleopatra of course. The ancient Egyptians took patriarchy to extreme lengths. The concept of a woman being chosen by God was impossible for them. Hatshepsut made every effort to buck this opposition. Indeed, her success is most notable. It is so unusual that commentators have failed to really convince us why she even managed what she did. Before she either died, abdicated or was forcibly removed from the throne, she managed to erect a magnificent temple at Deir el-Bahari. The Ramesside scribes removed her - and Akhenaten - from the official lists. Only modern Egyptologists have effectively returned her to those lists. Akhenaten was removed for religious apostasy. Commentators fail to consider Hatshepsut lost the throne and her position in the king-lists for the same reason. But what would that 'apostasy' be? Her temple at Deir el-Bahari, describes a massive overseas journey she and her retinue made to a place called Punt. Where was Punt? This is also in dispute. Amenhotep III said "When I look to the sunrise I come to the countries (plural) of Punt". Thus, Punt was Israel and Phoenicia or Pun-icea. Israel's Chronicals of its kings tell of the visit of the "Queen of Ophir" (a.k.a Queen Sheba) to Israel. In the Hebrew, "Ophir" is written 'A-u-ph-i-r-ah' or Africa. Israel and Egypt are neighbours. The mnost sensible deduction from all this is that Hatshepsut must have been the person recorded in the Israelite annals. However, we have to push her dynasty forward 500 years to make that fit. But that is reason why Hatshepsut's reign is so "unusual". Firstly, it indicates that Egyptian chronology is erroneous. Secondly, Jesus of Nazareth's statement about the queen who visited Solomon clearly indicates she believed in the God of Israel. That would be apostasy and heresy for Egyptians. Which is why Ramesses II removed her name from the king-lists. Thirdly, and the implication is quite clear, the God of Israel raised her up to be queen although she did not understand this until she met Solomon and read his Song of Solomon. She returned to Egypt and built a temple to echo the words of SoS 2:14; "Oh my Dove, you are in the cleft of the rocks in the secret places of the stairs". If one studies pictures of Hatshepsut's temple with secret tunnels drilled into the cliffs, the secret Holy of Holies at the top of the stairs and the cleft-filled cliff-face in the backdrop, one will get the point. The reason why Hatshepsut so unusually acsended the throne of Egypt is that her husband and consort died young but under the treaty terms between the Ethiopians and Egyptians (18th dynasty) she was able to insist on continuing to rule alone. But the real player behind all this would seem to be Israel's God who is the real player behind modern circumstances surrounding modern Israel's and modern Egypt's affairs.
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Why did Hatshepsut wear a false beard?

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because she was bi, and she wanted to be Pharaoh but she was a woman so she acted like a man pharohh..hope that helped ! :)
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Did hatshepsut kill her husband?

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it is possible that she had killed him to become pharaoh, but we are not positive.
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How are Hatshepsut and Cleopatra the same?

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The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds. The only similarity between Cleopatra and Hatsheput was that they were both female rulers of Egypt. Each woman lived at a different time and they were of different ethnic backgrounds.
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What year did hatshepsut rule?

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She ruled from 1479 to 1458 BC
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Why was queen hatshepsut an unusual leader?

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The fact she was female made her unusual and she dressed as the males did.
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Was queen Hatshepsut the first queen in Egypt?

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No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty. No. The first known queen of Egypt, ruling in her own right, was a woman called Sobekneferu, from the 12th dynasty.
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Who ruled Egypt after queen Hatshepsut?

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Thutmosis III (from 1505 to 1450BC)
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What is the symbol of Hatshepsut?

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Hatshepsut wore a false beard as the symbol of her power.
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What was Queen Hatshepsut nick name?

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Queen Hat is Queen Hatshepsuts nick name!!